Crunchyroll Announces Its Winter 2021 Lineup

Crunchyroll has announced the anime titles the site will be streaming during the Winter 2021 anime season.

Re:ZERO -Starting Life in Another World- Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 6, 2021.

The Hidden Dungeon Only I Can Enter will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 8, 2021.

So I’m a Spider, So What? will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 8, 2021.

World Trigger Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Latin America including the Caribbean, South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa. MENA and CIS Countries. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 9, 2021.

That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 12, 2021.

Dr. Stone (Season 2) will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The anime is scheduled to premiere in Japan on January 14, 2021.

Anime Azurlane: Slow Ahead! will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

Dr. Ramune -Mysterious Disease Specialist will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

EX-ARM will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

Laid-Back Camp Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

Heaven’s Design Team will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

The Quintessential Quintuplets Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, and CIS. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

Tropical-Rouge! Pretty Cure will be available to users in North America, Latin America including the Caribbean, South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa. MENA and CIS Countries. The airtime for this title is still to be determined.

True Cooking Master Boy will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this anime is still to be determined.

Umamusume Pretty Derby Season 2 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this anime is still to be determined.

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories 8 will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The airtime for this anime is still to be determined.

Given The Movie will be available to users in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS. The film is scheduled to begin streaming on the site in February 2021.

Crunchyroll will continue its simulcasts for Anime Kapibarasan, Attack on Titan Final Season, Black Clover, Boruto: Naruto Next Generations, Case Closed, Digimon Adventure:, Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai, Healin’ Good Pretty Cure, Jujutsu Kaisen, Mr. Osomatsu 3rd Season, Oh Suddenly, Egyptian God, One Piece, Onyx Equinox, Shadowverse, With a Dog AND a Cat, Every Day Is Fun, and Yashahime: Princess Half-Demon during the Winter 2021 anime season.

Crunchyroll’s announcement teases that there are more titles still to be announced for the Winter 2021 anime season. There are nine entries with question marks next to them, with the words: “MORE TO COME…”

Source: Crunchyroll

Crunchyroll Announces Three More Simulcasts for the Summer 2019 Anime Season

Crunchyroll has announced that it will simulcast the second season of the Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon? anime, the If It’s for My Daughter, I’d Even Defeat a Demon Lord (Uchi no Ko no tame naraba, ore wa moshikashitara Maō mo Taoseru kamoshirenai.) anime, and the seventh season of the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories anime.

The simulcast for the second season of Is It Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon? will debut on July 12, 2019 at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

The simulcast for If It’s for My Daughter, I’d Even Defeat a Demon Lord will debut on July 4, 2019 at 12:00 p.m. EDT, and it will be available for users worldwide except in Asia.

The simulcast for the seventh season of Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories will debut on Sunday, July 7, 2019 at 3:30 p.m. EDT, and it will be available for users worldwide except in Asia.

Source: ANN

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories Anime to Get Seventh Season in Summer 2019

It has been announced that the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories television anime series is getting a seventh season that will premiere in July 2019.

Kenichi Sugimoto of DRAWIZ is returning to direct the new anime at ILCA. Scriptwriters Ayako Yamaguchi, Hiromu Kumamoto, Kuniyoshi Saki, and Mitsuhi Sasagi are also returning. The animators include Yū Ebihara, Tatsuya Morino, Yukio Kanesada, Yoroshi Aka, Seiya Yamaguchi, Atsushi Itou, and Saya Kanamura. IANDA and DRAWIS are credited for production assistance. The artist betcover!! performs the ending theme song “Kekkai” (Barrier).

Kanji Tsuda returns to play the storyteller. The show’s other cast members include: Ryota Murai, Shunsaku Yoshimura, Ryō Shinoda, Nobuhiko Ōakami, Masaki Sawai, Rimo Hasegawa, Sena Horikoshi, Hikaru Kotama, Yūki Nishinoya, Ayaka Ōta, Kumi Nakamura, Sae Izumi, Sachiko Nakagomi, Kazuo Andō, and Virtual YouTuber character Taku Nanase.

Source: ANN

Crunchyroll Adds 10 More Simulcasts for the Summer 2018 Season

Crunchyroll has updated its Summer 2018 simulcast lineup with 10 more titles. The following new shows will stream on the site:

  • Holmes of Kyoto (Holmes at Kyoto Teramachi Sanjō)
  • Asobi Asobase – workshop of fun –
  • Mr. Tonegawa: Middle Management Blues (Chūkan Kanriroku Tonegawa)
  • Starlight Promises (Yakusoku no Nanaya Matsuri)

In addition, Crunchyroll will stream the following sequel series and new seasons:

  • One Room Second Season
  • Working Buddies! Season 2 (Hataraku Oniisan! no 2!)
  • Monster Strike 3rd Season
  • THE IDOLM@STER Cinderella Girls Theater 3rd Season (The Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls Gekijō)
  • Encouragement of Climb Season 3 (Yama no Susume Third Season)
  • Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories 6th Season

All of the above shows except Starlight Promises, Monster Strike 3rd Season, and Encouragement of Climb Season 3 will be available worldwide outside of Asia. Starlight Promises and Monster Strike 3rd Season will be available worldwide outside of Japan, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau.

Encouragement of Climb Season 3 will be available in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Netherlands, Turkey, Latin America (Central and South America including the Caribbean), Spain, Portugal, France, Belgium, French-speaking Switzerland, French-speaking Andorra, French-speaking Luxembourg, Monaco, Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein, German-speaking Switzerland, German-speaking Luxembourg, the Middle East, and Arabic-speaking Africa.

Source: ANN

Sentai Filmworks Licenses the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories Anime

Sentai Filmworks has announced that it will release the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories television anime on DVD and Blu-ray Disc in a “Complete Collection” set.

The release lists the runtime at 117 minutes, and online retailer Right Stuf is listing that the release will contain 26 episodes, which is the episode count of the first and second seasons of the series combined. Both the Blu-ray Disc and the DVD are slated for release on April 19, 2016. The DVD set retails for US$24.98 and the Blu-ray Disc set retails for US$34.98.

Source: ANN

Second Season of Yamishibai Coming in Summer 2014

The official website for the Yamishibai horror anime shorts has announced that there will be a second season of shorts coming to Japanese television in Summer 2014. In addition, the first season of the Yamishibai shorts will begin re-airing in April 2014; however, the actual broadcast dates and times have not been announced yet.

Takashi Shimizu and Noboru Iguchi will be directing the second season, and Shoichiro Masumoto will be writing the scripts.

Source: ANN

Anime Spotlight: Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories is a series of anime shorts produced by ILCA and directed by Tomoya Takashima. The shorts began airing on Japanese television on July 14, 2013.

Each of the shorts opens with an old man who shows up every week at a children’s playground at 5:00 p.m. to tell Japanese ghost stories. The shorts are animated in such a way that it mimics kamishibai, which is a traditional Japanese method of storytelling.

There are a total of 13 shorts for Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories. Each short is about five minutes in length, and each short tells the story of someone who experiences some kind of horror.

Over the course of the series, a man is terrorized by a woman who keeps putting talismans in his apartment, a man who lost consciousness and awakens in the hospital with no memory of how he got there, a boy whose family is being haunted by the ghost of the boy’s great-great grandfather, an elementary school teacher who is being haunted while she stays late to work one night, a man who is haunted in an elevator at a department store, a man who is haunted on a train, a young woman whose two friends become possessed, a boy who visits his friend in the country and he sees something he shouldn’t, a girl who is inflicted with a curse, a high school boy who is terrorized by a bathroom monster while he’s at a baseball training camp, middle school boys who watch a video that ends badly, a high school girl who is haunted by a shadow of a child, and a boy whose friend becomes possessed.

When I first started watching the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories shorts, the series felt kind of fresh and unique. Unfortunately, when I reached episode six, I picked up on the fact that there was a bit of a formula being used for writing the stories. I know that the writers can be a little limited in what they can do with a roughly five-minute runtime, so it’s probably easier to starting relying on a formula. This didn’t bother me during the previous five shorts, because I hadn’t entirely picked up on the formula. But after I realized what the formula for the storytelling was, it started to dampen my enjoyment and enthusiasm for Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories.

My favorite short in this series would have to be the ninth one, which is titled, “Cursed.” Of the shorts in the series, I felt this particular one relied a lot less on the formula than most of the others.

While I thought Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories was an OK series, I’m really not sure I’d continue watching again if new shorts were ever produced for it. To me, while the shorts were kind of interesting at first, I became less and less interested as the series went on.

Then again, I admit that I’m not a huge fan of the horror genre. Perhaps Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories would hold a stronger appeal to viewers who enjoy horror stories.

Additional Anime Spotlights:

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories: Episode 13 – “Tormentor”

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories is a series of anime shorts, and the shorts run for about five minutes each. They feature an old man who shows up every week at a children’s playground at 5:00 p.m. to tell Japanese ghost stories.

A group of three elementary school boys are watching a house near their neighborhood with binoculars; the boy with the binoculars is named Shouta. Legend has it that the Tormentor lives there; according to one of the boys, the Tormentor caused his grandmother’s childhood friend to mysteriously disappear. This boy says he needs to go to cram school and leaves.

Taichi, the other boy, sneers about the other boy being a wimp after he leaves. Just them, Shouta says he sees people coming out the house wearing blindfolds and with one of the people looking like he’s dancing. Before Shouta can really see anything else, Taichi snatches the binoculars away to see for himself. As Taichi looks, he becomes scared and then suddenly begins doing the dancing motion of the other people and leaves.

The next day, Shouta goes to Taichi’s house to return the binoculars. Taichi’s father tells Shouta that Taichi will be transferring to a school in Tokyo and that Shouta can keep the binoculars. After Shouta leaves, he turns around and uses the binoculars to look back at Taichi’s house. Taichi’s father points at something, but before Shouta can take in his surroundings, he is attacked.

Unfortunately, this short has a similar basic premise to a couple of the other shorts in the series (“The Umbrella Goddess” and “The Family Rule”); because someone saw something they weren’t supposed to, something bad happens to them. While the execution of these stories is very different, it still boils down to that same idea. So that in respect, it did end up falling into a formula. However, I will admit that even though this basic premise wasn’t new to me as a viewer, the very end of this short did almost cause me to jump out of my chair.

“Tormentor” is currently the last short for the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories series. While I thought this was an OK series, I’m really not sure I’d continue watching again if new shorts were ever produced for it. To me, while the shorts were kind of interesting at first, I became less and less interested as the series went on. Around the halfway point I picked up on a formula that was being used to write most of the shorts, so it started to make the series feel a little more predictable and I generally wasn’t as scared at the end of the shorts as I would have thought I would have been.

Then again, I admit that I’m not a huge fan of the horror genre. Perhaps Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories would hold a stronger appeal to viewers who enjoy horror stories.

Additional posts about Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories:

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories: Episode 12 – “Tomonari-kun”

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories is a series of anime shorts, and the shorts run for about five minutes each. They feature an old man who shows up every week at a children’s playground at 5:00 p.m. to tell Japanese ghost stories.

One day, a high school girl returns home from school and sees a group of boys huddled in a courtyard area of their apartment complex. When she asks them what they’re doing, they say they’re playing with Tomonari. The girl sees a shadow-like mass in the center of their circle, and the boys say that is Tomonari; the boys also say that the girl should play with them. The girl says she has to go home and do homework, but that she’ll play some other time. The boys talk to the shadow-like mass and say that the girl can’t help it that she has to study, but she promised to play later.

At a later time, the girl goes to get her bike, and the boys are huddled around the shadow-like mass in the courtyard again. The boys ask her to play, but she says she has to go to her part-time job. The boys argue that she had promised, but she insists that she has to go to work.

When the girl comes home, the boys come to her door and ask if Tomonari can play, because Tomonari said he would be going to her house. The boys see a shadow-like mass on the ceiling of her house and try to point it out. The girl slams the door on them. Afterward, she sees the shadow-like mass on the ceiling, and then something unexpected happens; the unexpected happening ends the short.

Well, what can I say about this short? On the one hand, it doesn’t fall into the formula that some of the other Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories shorts have fallen into. However, this short, along with some of the more recent shorts, seem to have gotten stranger and stranger premises. Honestly, I can’t really come up with any explanation for how the final unexpected event happens. Yes, the other shorts have had some of these bizarre twists, but I could at least come up with some kind of explanation for them. The past couple of shorts, not so much.

And is it just me, or do the boys in the short come across as being possessed? I’m sure that characterization was intentional, but it sure made those boys seem awfully creepy! I’ve read some people say that the moral of this short is to keep your promises. Personally, I’ve got a better moral for this one: Stay out of other people’s business. If the girl hadn’t gone over and asked the boys what they were doing, she probably never would have gotten sucked into this story!

There’s just one more short left for Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories, and I’m very curious to see whether it will be more in line with the stranger shorts that have appeared recently, if it’s going to end up falling into a predictable formula, or if it’s going to end up doing something completely unexpected.

Additional posts about Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories:

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories: Episode 11 – “Video”

Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories is a series of anime shorts, and the shorts run for about five minutes each. They feature an old man who shows up every week at a children’s playground at 5:00 p.m. to tell Japanese ghost stories.

This short sees three middle school students trying to finish a lot of homework on the last day of summer vacation. When one of the boys suggests taking a break, another one says he has a tape that was lent to him that supposedly shows a ghost; according to the kid with the video, it was recorded during a test of courage, but that the person who shot the video forgot to bring the camera back home with him. The person who shot the video claims they saw footage on the tape that they didn’t remember shooting.

The kid with the tape takes it out, and we see that it’s covered with black tape. The kid takes all of the tape off and puts it into the VCR. As the way, two of the boys point out something that resembles a human face next to a gravestone. Takaaki, the third boy, notices a humanoid figure in the background. The other two friends don’t see it and accuse Takaaki of making it up.

As Takaaki continues to watch, he notices that the humanoid figure has disappeared. He rewinds the tape, and when he plays it, the humanoid figure is actually closer up than he had originally seen it, and the figure turns to look at him. As expected, there ends up being a creepy surprise right at the end of the short.

In some respects, the buildup of the short kind of falls into the storytelling formula that I’ve seen develop over the course of the Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories anime shorts. However, the idea of something being tied into a video recording was a new element that helped to disguise the formula and made this short a little interesting.

But after watching this short, I wondered what time period this was set in. Since this plot relies heavily on a videocassette and a VCR being used by pre-teens and teenagers, I don’t think it’s set in the current modern time. I mean, if the writers intended for this short to be set in the modern day, then it does make this short a little on the unbelievable side.

Outside of that little nitpick, though, it wasn’t too bad of a short. I’ll go ahead and keep watching Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories since there are so few shorts left in the series.

Additional posts about Yamishibai: Japanese Ghost Stories: