Anime Blu-ray Review: Wizard Barristers Complete Collection

Wizard Barristers Complete Collection is a two-disc set that includes all 12 episodes of the series. The set includes both the original Japanese audio with English subtitles and the English dub.

Wizard Barristers Complete Collection
English Publisher: Sentai Filmworks
Format: Blu-ray
Release Date: March 1, 2016

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices. We learn that she became a wizard barrister in order to save her mother from execution, because she was found guilty of murder in the Court of Magic six years earlier.

Natsuna Hotaru joins the firm on the same day as Cecil and is jealous of her for most of the series. Other members of the Butterfly Law Offices include Mitsuhisa Hachiya, paralegal Moyo Tento, Tsunomi Kabutohara, Koromo Sasori, law firm leader Ageha Chono, second partner Seseri Chono, receptionist Batta Mitori, and Tobirou Kamakiri.

The Metropolitan Police Department includes two important characters: Quinn Erari and her partner, Shizumu Ekuso. It turns out that Shizumu has a secret and that it’s tied in with Cecil.

We also meet members of the Shark Knight Law Firm, and it’s revealed later in the series that there’s more to their firm than meets the eye.

As Cecil tries to find a way to get a retrial for her mother, it’s discovered that Cecil has more power than she ever dreamed of, and that something important happened concerning her during the incident that took place six years earlier that landed her mother on death row.

At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series.

By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. However, over time, I came to realize that Cecil’s mother was a MacGuffin (i.e. her existence and what happened to her was there to simply serve as a trigger for the plot). But outside of Cecil’s mother and her situation being a MacGuffin, I enjoyed Wizard Barristers.

The Blu-ray video for this set has 1080p High Definition / 16×9, and the audio includes English DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 and Japanese DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0. I had no complaints about either the video or audio quality of this release.

The bonus features are all included on the second disc. The “Web Previews” are the episode previews that appeared at the end of the episodes during the simulcast. This feature has Japanese audio and English subtitles. There is also a clean opening, a clean closing, and a menu of trailers for other Sentai Filmworks releases. While the bonus features aren’t terribly impressive, at least there’s a little more here than simply the clean opening and the clean ending (which seems to be a standard thing on Sentai Filmworks releases).

If you’ve streamed the Wizard Barristers anime and enjoyed what you’ve seen, then this Blu-ray release would be a good addition to your anime home video library.

Additional post about Wizard Barristers:

My Favorite Anime With Mystery Elements

Normally, these lists have five items; however, this is a case where I could only come up with four items. Going forward, these lists will contain either four or five items.

This time, my list focuses on my favorite anime with mystery elements. Like usual, this is not a ranked list. Instead, the items are listed in alphabetical order.

Case Closed

Shinichi Kudo is a high school mystery buff who has incredible abilities with both his power of observation and his intuition. In fact, he can solve mysteries that have baffled the Japanese police force. Unfortunately, Shinichi has a run-in with mysterious men dressed in black. After knocking Shinichi out, they use an experimental poison on him, expecting that the poison will kill him. Instead, it shrinks Shinichi down to either a six or seven-year-old. He takes on the identity of Conan Edogawa, and he ends up helping the bumbling detective Kogoro Mori solve cases while he tries to track down the Black Organization to get an antidote for the poison.

I appreciate how the mysteries in the series are presented in a “whodunit” style, as well as how many of them keep the audience guessing until Conan reveals what really happened. As I watch the episodes, I find myself trying to figure out who committed the crime and how they did it and then seeing if I’m right. Case Closed is a series that makes someone think as they watch it.

Eden of the East

At the beginning of the series, a college senior named Saki Morimi visits Washington, D.C. as part of her graduation trip. When she inadvertently gets in trouble at the White House, a mysterious naked young man holding a gun and cell phone appears and saves Saki. The young man has lost his memory, but he finds his way back to his apartment and discovers several fake passports. He chooses one with the name “Akira Takizawa” on it, and he returns to Japan after encountering Saki again. Akira’s mystery deepens when he discovers his phone has 8.2 billion yen in digital money, and that he can contact a concierge named Juiz who can fulfill any order he has for a price. Saki, along with her friends, try to help Akira unravel the mystery of the “game” that he is involved in.

The storytelling of Eden of the East is compelling early on, and it keeps the viewer interested in what’s going on during its 11-episode duration. I especially appreciated how as facts were revealed, it would constantly alternate between making Akira look like a villain and making him look like a hero. There was also a strong execution for the buildup of the mystery surrounding Akira’s past.

UN-GO

The series is set in a version of Japan that has dealt with war and numerous terrorist attacks. The main character is a detective named Shinjuro Yuki, who solves cases with his partner, Inga. Inga usually takes on the appearance of a young boy but will transform into a true form of a busty woman when it appears the truth is close to being revealed for a case. In this true form, Inga eats the souls of people to force them to honestly answer questions. Between this ability and Shinjuro’s keen insight for mysteries, they discover the truth of a crime. But Shinjuro lets another detective named Rinroku Kaishou take credit and “rewrite” the solutions to crimes. Supernatural elements and political intrigue enter the picture later in the series, and these new elements help elevate the series to the next level.

Un-Go starts out as a Case Closed-type series being aimed at an older audience, but the series becomes more than this around the halfway point. With the combination of the storytelling and the animation, this series is memorable for being more than an “adult” version of Case Closed and is an enjoyable viewing experience beyond this basic comparison.

Wizard Barristers

Wizard Barristers is set in a world where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. She became a wizard barrister in order to save her mother from execution because she was found guilty of murder in the Court of Magic six years earlier. As Cecil works as a wizard barrister, trying to prove that her various clients are innocent, she also learns that she has more power than she ever dreamed of, and that there is a secret in her past that relates to why her mother ended up on death row.

Wizard Barristers had a story that kept me interested in what was going on and want to continue watching each episode. The various cases that Cecil takes on are interesting and watching her in action with her co-workers trying to find the truth behind each one made for compelling viewing. And Cecil’s overarching story just added to the overall mystery feel of the series.

Additional lists:

English Cast Announced for the Wizard Barristers Anime

The English cast has been announced for the Wizard Barristers anime:

  • Brittney Karbowski is Cecil Sudou
  • Rob Mungle is Nanagenie
  • Kira Vincent Davis is Natsuna Hotaru and Seira
  • Shelley Calene-Black is Ageha Chono
  • Mark X Laskowski is Seseri Chono
  • David Wald is Mitsuhisa Hachiya
  • Monica Rial is Moyo Tento and Bubuhey
  • Allison Sumrall is Koromi Sasori
  • Krystal LaPorte is Tsunomi Kabutohara
  • James Belcher is Tobiro Kamakiri
  • Ciara Parker is Mitori Batta
  • Chris Patton is Shizumu Ekuso
  • Rachel Robinson is Quinn Erari and Nya-Nyaa
  • Andrew Love is Kiba Sameoka
  • Blake Shepard is Shibuki Kujira
  • Tiffany Grant is Megumi Sudou and Keiji
  • Ty Mahany is David and Oizumi
  • Josh Morrison is Shimon Makusu
  • Luke Patterson is Kaijino
  • Cody Tompson is Sazanami
  • Carl Masterson is Odagiri
  • Jovan Jackson is Otoo, Gang Leader, and Ciccio Dente
  • Darren Bush is Kohinata
  • Cornelia Brandfield-Harvey is Endou
  • Houston Hayes is Prosecutor
  • Carli Mosier is Mayu and Fumiya
  • Allen Titel is Masato
  • Joanne Bonasso is Kokki and Diana
  • Adam Noble is Rei and Yabe
  • Scott Gibbs is Tsukuji
  • Steven Fenley is Kiritani and Geir Grimm
  • Tyler Galindo is Suzui
  • Ned Gayle is Teacher
  • Katelyn Barr is Aki and Kaede
  • Kyle Colby Jones is Kint and Katase
  • Christopher Ayres is Shindaiji

Christopher Ayres is directing the dub.

Sentai Filmworks will be releasing Wizard Barristers on DVD and Blu-ray Disc on March 1, 2016.

Source: Sentai Filmworks

2014 In Review: Winter 2014 Season

Over the next few days, I’ll be publishing posts looking back at 2014. This first post takes a look back at the shows that I started watching during the Winter 2014 season. This post will also include series that I started watching in the Fall 2013 season that were still running with Winter 2014 started.

Log Horizon: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. This was a series that I admit to not being sure about when it first started in October 2013, but fortunately, I stuck with it and was rewarded with a series that made itself stand out from other anime series about characters who get stuck in a video game. I fell in love with this series by the time it finished airing in March 2014, and was overjoyed when the end of the final episode announced that there would be a second season that would begin airing in Fall 2014. I spent a lot of the year eagerly anticipating the second season because the first season had built such a strong foundation for the characters and their story.

Noragami: Noragami ended up being a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed the first four episodes, but then with Episode Five, I started feeling like the series wasn’t as strong as it was when it first started. My opinion improved a bit with Episode Six, and it kept improving through Episode 11. However, I was never entirely sure how I felt about Episode 12, because I couldn’t tell if it was meant to be a series finale or a season finale. As of this writing, there has been no word about a second season for Noragami, so I have to believe this was meant as a series finale. Unfortunately, there were enough loose ends that were left hanging which made it an unsatisfying note to end a series on. The manga for Noragami started being published during 2014, so I may need to start reading it at some point and see if it might improve my opinion of the series.

Tokyo Ravens: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. When I first watched this series, I thought it had a slow start. However, enough elements were established in the first episode to interest me enough to come back to see more. With the second episode, I felt it was a little heavy on the “info dumping” side, but I was still willing to come back because the story that was developing showed a lot of promise. By the time I hit Episode Five, I found myself genuinely interested in Tokyo Ravens and decided that I’d see it through until the end. I ended up being interested in Tokyo Ravens for most of its 24 episode run. Unfortunately, I started becoming a little disappointed in the series after a particular plot twist in Episode 23. I also ended up feeling rather let down and disappointed with how the final episode ended. FUNimation Entertainment, who had streamed the series as a simulcast, has recently announced that it has acquired the home video rights for Tokyo Ravens. Unfortunately, I have no plans to purchase their release to add it to my anime home video library because of my disappointment with the final two episodes of the series.

D-Frag!: This is an anime I watched because the previews made it look like it’d be really hilarious. While there was humor in the first episode, there wasn’t as much as I had expected. And from the humor that I did see in the episode, I saw the potential for the series to rely on the same gags every week; unfortunately, I ended up being right with that assumption. And the gags that the series relied so heavily upon weren’t terribly funny the first time they showed up, and they wore out their welcome rather quickly. With Episode Two, I saw that maybe D-Frag! had potential with its story, but sadly, that potential never materialized. It also didn’t help that the series already started feeling stagnant by Episode Four. When I reached the halfway point, I decided I’d stick it out, but that the second half of the series really couldn’t go fast enough for my taste. The final episode didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress had been made on the loose threads that were out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes earlier. And the final episode was the worst of the drudgery that I saw for that show. After that episode ended, all I could think was, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!”

Yowamushi Pedal: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. After watching the first episode, I thought I could see some potential in the series. Even though I’m not a fan of cycling, I found myself getting hooked on Yowamushi Pedal the more I watched of it. I especially found myself being riveted to the action that takes place during the racing scenes. I also liked how the characters developed over the course of the series. The main focus of the first half was on developing the members of the Sohoku team, with occasional development on members of the other two teams. However, the development for the other two teams tended to take place during the Inter-High race. The main selling point of this series to me ended up being the characters and the development they go through. While the pacing of Yowamushi Pedal was pretty typical for a shonen sports anime, it’s something I got used to with each race that appeared in the series. I was happy to hear that there would be a second season for the series in Fall 2014, especially since this season ended before the winner of the second day of the Inter-High was determined.

Hamatora: After watching the first episode of Hamatora, I felt that the series showed a bit of promise. However, I was little turned off by the character of Hajime, because it appeared her gluttony was going to be a major source of humor for the series. It turns out we learn later on why Hajime is such a glutton, and it also turned out that there was more in the way of humor than just Hajime’s gluttony. It was ultimately the second episode that sold me on Hamatora. I enjoyed seeing the various mysteries that came Hamatora’s way, and how several of the episodes were able to take what appeared to be two unrelated plots and find a way to weave the two together rather successfully by the end. Overall, I enjoyed the series except for Episode Five and Episode Eight. But when I saw that there was a cliffhanger ending and that there would be another season of Hamatora coming in the future, I was looking forward to seeing more episodes in order to find out how the story continued from the cliffhanger.

Nagi no Asukara: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that after watching the first episode, I had some mixed feelings. On the one hand, I kind of liked the story, although I was finding Hikari to be a bit on the annoying side. However, I was having problems with using my willing suspension of disbelief about people being able to live underwater. It turns out that the concept of Ena, which allows them to breathe underwater, hadn’t been properly introduced by the end of the first episode. I decided to continue watching the series, and went into the second episode using my willing suspension of disbelief and focusing on the storytelling. It’s a decision I’m glad I made, because I found myself being more impressed with the series and becoming genuinely interested in the characters and their stories. I’d become so riveted with the series that when the first half reached its climax with the Ofunehiki, I was a little frustrated that I had to wait two weeks in order to find out what happened. When the second half of the series started, I have to admit that it was a bit of an adjustment to get used to the fact that a five year timeskip had happened between the two episodes and that some of the cast members were noticeably older. I appreciated how there was a focus on the confusion for both those who returned from the surface after a five-year hibernation and those who stayed on the surface and aged five years. There’s a lot of raw emotion that’s prevalent in the second half of the series, but I found these emotions and reactions to be believable. I have to admit that for the most part, I had basically predicted what directions the various relationships would go in. However, I still found the conclusion of the series to be satisfying and enjoyable.

Samurai Flamenco: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. At the end of the first episode, I thought that between the animation and the storytelling, there seemed to be enough there to keep my interest and make me want to come back week after week to watch more of Samurai Flamenco. I have to admit that when the King Torture arc was introduced and caused the major tonal shift for the series, I wasn’t entirely sure that I liked it. It didn’t help that it was also at that point that the animation quality went down noticeably, and that “off model” shots started becoming more prevalent and noticeable. By the end of the King Torture, arc, though, I had become so accustomed to the change in tone that I started enjoying the series a bit more again. Overall, though, I did enjoy Samurai Flamenco when all was said and done.

Magical Warfare: After watching the first episode, I thought the series had some potential. After the second episode, I thought it plodded a bit due all of the exposition included, but I still thought that the overall concept still showed promise. At the end of Episode Three, I said that while Magical Warfare wasn’t one of my favorite series of Winter 2014, I couldn’t say that it was the worst one I was watching, either. By the end of Episode Four, I was already at a point where I wasn’t looking forward to watching the series week after week. As the series continued to progress, I became frustrated with how the series was paced, the fact that the villains weren’t very well defined by the halfway point of the series, and how the character development wasn’t where it needed to be for me to truly care about these characters. The final episode was a major letdown, due to how little was explained for what was happening throughout it. The ending of the final episode was so vague that the viewer was left having to make a lot of assumptions just to figure out what the heck was going on. Honestly, the way Magical Warfare ended was just so vague and bizarre that it makes the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion seem like it makes sense. And considering the reputation the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion has, that’ss really saying something. All in all, I have to say that Magical Warfare ended up being a steaming pile of poo and I think it was easily one of the worst series I watched during 2014.

Strike the Blood: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that I wasn’t entirely sure about Strike the Blood after watching the first episode, but I decided to give it a chance and continue watching it. After watching the second episode, though, I was more impressed with the series than I thought I’d be. The cliffhanger ending for Episode Three ultimately sold me on the series. As the series progressed through the various story arcs, more characters were introduced. Most of them seemed to have an importance to the series, although there were a couple of characters who were only truly important for one or two story arcs, and then basically all but vanished from the series. After making it through all 24 episodes of Strike the Blood, I have to say that overall, I was satisfied with how the series progressed and ultimately came to its conclusion. It was a series I came to look forward to watching.

Wizard Barristers: At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series. By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. The viewer was left with the responsibility of assuming what happens.

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha: I have to admit that at the end of the first episode, I wasn’t entirely sure if I was going to like Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha. However, I decided to keep watching to see if the story would improve. After finishing Episode Two, my opinion of the series started becoming more favorable. As the episodes went on, I continued to enjoy the series more and more. I’m so glad I didn’t let my initial unsure impression keep me away from this series. Overall, I thought the series was good, although the last couple of episodes felt a bit rushed compared to the other episodes; I have to say that Episode 10 had more issues with being rushed than Episode Nine did. The action in the first half of Episode 10 felt stretched out, and then the story in the second half ended up feeling rushed. In the final episode, I appreciated the fact that it demonstrated just how much Inari has grown as a character over the course of the series. In a lot of ways, when Inari returned Uka’s divine power at the end of Episode 10, it symbolizes that Inari had grown up and no longer needs the “crutch” that she thought the power was giving her. In a lot of respects, though, there is some vagueness at the end of the final episode. Do Inari and Koji ever end up together? Is Touka still able to see Uka even though Inari no longer can? It appears that the manga series is still ongoing in Japan, so that might explain why the ending of the anime is a bit ambiguous.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

Anime Spotlight: Wizard Barristers

Wizard Barristers is an anime produced by ARMS and directed by Yasuomi Umetsu. The series aired on Japanese television from January 12-March 30, 2014. As of this writing, Sentai Filmworks holds the North American home video license for Wizard Barristers.

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices. We learn that she became a wizard barrister in order to save her mother from execution, because she was found guilty of murder in the Court of Magic six years earlier.

Natsuna Hotaru joins the firm on the same day as Cecil, and is jealous of her for most of the series. Other members of the Butterfly Law Offices include Mitsuhisa Hachiya, paralegal Moyo Tento, Tsunomi Kabutohara, Koromo Sasori, law firm leader Ageha Chono, second partner Seseri Chono, receptionist Batta Mitori, and Tobirou Kamakiri.

The Metropolitan Police Department includes two important characters: Quinn Erari and her partner, Shizumu Ekuso. It turns out that Shizumu has a secret and that it’s tied in with Cecil.

We also meet members of the Shark Knight Law Firm, and it’s revealed later in the series that there’s more to their firm than meets the eye.

As Cecil tries to find a way to get a retrial for her mother, it’s discovered that Cecil has more power than she ever dreamed of, and that something important happened concerning her during the incident that took place six years earlier that landed her mother on death row.

At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series.

By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. The viewer was left with the responsibility of assuming what happens.

Overall, Wizard Barristers turned out to be a pretty good series, even though I’m disappointed with the fact that the loose end about Cecil’s mother still exists. Of the six new shows I watched during the Winter 2014 season, Wizard Barristers was only beaten out slightly by Hamatora as my favorite new show of the season. Since Sentai Filmworks has licensed the series for home video release, there’s a chance of getting it on home video at some point in the future. This is a title that I’d be willing to add to my personal anime home video library.

Additional post about Wizard Barristers:

Wizard Barristers: Episode 12 – “Judgment”

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices.

At the end of Episode 11, Makusu asked for Cecil to represent him at his trial. Cecil isn’t sure what to do, and Hotaru suggests visiting him before making a decision. Cecil agrees with this idea. When Cecil goes to see Makusu, he claims that he’ll confess everything and admit to everything starting with the incident six years ago. He says he asked Cecil to represent him as his way of making things up to her.

Later, when Cecil talks with the others at the office, and they wonder whether or not he’ll truly come clean. Cecil decides that she needs to represent Makusu, since this is the first real chance she’s seen about getting her mother a retrial.

When Cecil meets the prosecutor on the case, it turns out to be the same prosecutor from her mother’s trial. During the pre-trial hearing, it appears that Makusu is up to something, and this is confirmed when the trial actually gets going. Cecil and the Butterfly Law Offices have to find a way to prove that Makusu is guilty, even though they’re supposed to be the ones defending him. Near the end, some unexpected things happen that bring about a favorable resolution for Cecil.

Wow, this episode ended up getting rather intense during the trial. And as Makusu tried to spin more and more lies to try to get himself out of trouble, I swear my blood was almost boiling. I was glad to see him knocked down several pegs near the end of the episode!

Unfortunately, we don’t learn exactly what kind of sentence Makusu ends up receiving, and whether or not Cecil’s mother is granted a retrial. My biggest disappointment with this episode is the fact that we don’t learn what happens to Cecil’s mother. At this point, the viewer is left with the responsibility of assuming what happens. Fans of the show who are fanfic writers could have a field day with the fact that this loose end exists, though.

Overall, Wizard Barristers turned out to be a pretty good series, even though I’m disappointed with the fact that the loose end about Cecil’s mother still exists. Of the six new shows I watched during the Winter 2014 season, Wizard Barristers was only beaten out slightly by Hamatora as my favorite new show of the season. Since Sentai Filmworks has licensed the series for home video release, there’s a chance of getting it on home video at some point in the future. This is a title that I’d be willing to add to my personal anime home video library.

Additional posts about Wizard Barristers:

Wizard Barristers: Episode 11 – “Shining Cecil”

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices.

Episode 11 opens with Shizumu and some SAT officers barging into Butterfly Law Offices and demanding that they surrender Cecil. While this is going on, Cecil, Hotaru, and Hachiya see the police at the firm. Hachiya tells Cecil and Hotaru to run. They meet up with Sasori, and the three of them decide they’ll go by train since the roads have checkpoints. Unfortunately, Shizumu and the police catch up to them, and a battle of magic breaks out. Shizumu is able to overwhelm them and takes Cecil into custody.

Meanwhile, Inspector Quinn is in the hospital, and her vital signs flatline. However, Moyo stops time and comes into the room to bring Quinn back to life. Moyo says it’s for Cecil and that Quinn should be grateful. After Moyo leaves, Quinn regains consciousness.

Macal begins the summoning ritual. Some members start falling like flies as magic circles begin appearing. A magic circle can also be seen in the sky by Wuds and humans alike. As this is going on, Moyo suddenly undergoes a change to start looking like a devil. During the ceremony, the beads in Cecil’s hair break, and she finds herself and Moyo in a space bathed in light. Moyo tells her to become one with her because she has no choice.

Cecil starts transforming to look like a devil, wings, tail, and all. When Makusu sees that Lucifer has taken over Cecil’s body, he demands that Lucifer give him his strength. Lucifer informs him that he already descended to this world six years ago, when Makusu used his summoning magic to bring the 11-year-old Cecil back to life. Under normal circumstances, Lucifer is supposed to give the summoner his power, but Lucifer would rather give the power to Cecil. Shizumu, racked with guilt over what he’s done, casts a spell which causes Cecil’s transformation to end. An explosion also happens.

When Cecil comes to, Shizumu is by her and apologizes for what he’s put her through. An enraged Makusu shoots and kills Shizumu. This is followed by Makusu and Cecil both summoning metamoloids, and an epic battle takes place.

It turns out that my suspicions about Moyo were correct. However, it turns out that it was a good thing that Cecil had become friends with her. Who knows how this might have turned out if they hadn’t.

In the end, I was a little disappointed that Shizumu was killed. Yes, he became rather obsessed with Cecil in order to help Macal’s cause, but after learning what would happen to her and actually seeing it happen, he had a change of heart. Shizumu was ultimately the one who saved Cecil from Macal, and he seemed to have some very genuine remorse right before he was killed.

Some more information regarding the incident six years ago is also revealed in this episode, and it looks like Cecil may have finally found a way to get a retrial for her mother. Unfortunately, something happens right at the end of Episode 11 that’s a kick in the gut for both Cecil and the audience

Episode 11 ended up being a rather exciting episode. While I had predicted Moyo’s role before seeing it, a lot took place in this episode that I never predicted. And I felt horrible for Cecil after the episode was over, because Makusu has done something that’s going to cause Cecil a lot of grief in Episode 12.

I’m really looking forward to watching Episode 12 in order to find out how Wizard Barristers will be brought to an end.

Additional posts about Wizard Barristers:

Wizard Barristers: Episode 10 – “Imposters”

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices.

Episode 10 begins where Episode Nine left off, with Sameoka from Shark Knight leading Cecil through the streets and trying to keep Shizumu from catching up to them. At the end of the previous episode, Sameoka had told Cecil that she had actually died in the incident six years earlier. Here, he explains that she was brought back by someone using summoning magic. Cecil frees herself from Sameoka’s grasp and asks him to show her something to prove that she can trust him. Unfortunately, Shizumu catches up and launches an attack with magic. Sameoka and Shizumu get into a magic battle, which is interrupted by Moyo arriving, causing commotion, and whisking Cecil off to safety.

Later, Butterfly Law Offices learn that Sameoka has been arrested and that they have been asked to represent him. They head off to interview him.

Shizumu tells Quinn to do a premise search at Shark Knight, because he claims that Sameoka is suspected of human trafficking. Quinn asks Shizumu what he’s plotting, because he’s been acting highly suspicious. He manages to placate her by saying that he’ll explain everything to her when it’s all over.

When Ageha and the others arrive to interview Sameoka, they’re told that they’re not allowed to see him. Quinn arrives and Ageha asks her what’s going on. Quinn says she doesn’t know, but that she’ll look into it and handle it accordingly. Quinn then asks where Cecil is, because she’s been missing since this morning.

Cecil has a talk with Moyo about what she’s learned and the confusion she’s been in. Moyo gets a call from Butterfly, and the two of them head to the office. While this is going on, Shizumu, Quinn and their squad go to Shark Knight for the premise search. Kujira makes an escape, with Shizumu pursuing him and shooting at him. Fortunately, the bullet just grazes Kujira’s arm. Quinn comes over and punches Shizumu in the face. The two get into an argument, and Shizumu reveals he’s a Wud and does something to Quinn…

Cecil is contacted by Kujira, and the two meet secretly. It’s at this point that both she and the audience learn the truth about Shark Knight and about Cecil herself…

This episode was packed with a lot of information and action. Shizumu is getting frantic, because time is running out for him to get Cecil and bring her to Macal. However, he also becomes tormented when he learns what will happen to Cecil after she is used as the catalyst. We also learn that the judge, prosecutor, and wizard barrister involved in Cecil’s mother’s trial six years earlier have deeper connections to Macal than it seemed.

Cecil also finally admits to everyone at the Butterfly Law Offices about her mother. Fortunately, the others are there to support her and say they’re there to help her out.

For a little while now, I’ve also been a little suspicious of Moyo. And after something Kujira says to Cecil about Moyo, I’m very suspicious of her and her motives.

There was a lot of information coming out and action taking place during this episode, and it really kept me riveted and interested in the story. I definitely want to see Episode 11 in order to find out how the series will continue on from this point. There’s so many different directions it could go in, and I really have no idea what to predict!

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Wizard Barristers: Episode 9 – “Secret Puzzle”

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices.

The beginning of the episode shows the viewer what exactly happened at Cecil’s mother’s trial six years earlier. By getting to see this and getting to hear some more information that was revealed, it explains something Cecil said in regards to a now former friend that was in a photograph that appeared in Episode Eight. After seeing this, I was like, “It’s no wonder that Cecil and that boy are now former friends.”

Throughout this episode, Cecil is trying to find anything that could help change the outcome of her mother’s trial. She tries contacting the Wizard Barrister and the prosecutor in the case, but isn’t able to get anywhere. She’s able to reach the judge in the case, but does so by using Moyo’s name. Unfortunately for Cecil, the meeting with the judge ends rather badly. Cecil then reaches out to Inspector Shimuzu, and he says he’ll try to check out the investigation files.

Meanwhile, Cecil’s colleagues at the Butterfly Law Offices talk about what happened to them in Boston. Through an investigation, it was revealed that Diana had stolen the identity of someone who was already deceased. The only clue they have is “Macal,” which Diana mentioned in Episode Eight. When the conversation turns to trying to find out whether or not the Grimoire 365 really exists, they are all told not to act on their own since they don’t know who they’re dealing with.

Cecil gets a call from Inspector Shimuzu, saying he’s gotten the investigation files and wants to meet with her. At their designated meeting place, Cecil gets a surprise…

First off, I liked seeing Hotaru standing up for Cecil when she comes late for a meeting. The shocked expressions on her colleagues’ faces were priceless! Hotaru claims that she’s not defending Cecil, she just thought that this should be dealt with a little more rationally. Later, we see Hotaru talking with Ageha. She says she has no intention of pitying Cecil, but she’d like to help her in any way that she can. I do like seeing this character progression for Hotaru. Yes, she can still be a little defensive at times, but she’s really dialed back the bitchiness factor considerably.

The last few minutes of Episode Nine are rather intense, and it looks like Cecil may finally get the information she needs to piece everything together. With how this episode ends, it looks like Episode 10 will finally reveal information for both Cecil and the audience. If I have to predict, I have a feeling that after Cecil learns the truth she’ll have to decide how she wants to act in regards to what she learns and what any consequences of her actions are. Considering how reckless Cecil can be at times, the consequences of any actions she takes could be rather major.

I can’t believe that Wizard Barristers is getting closer to reaching its conclusion. Even with the occasional “fanservice” elements, I’m enjoying the series quite a bit. I’m looking forward to seeing Episode 10 to find out what exactly will be happening.

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Wizard Barristers: Episode 8 – “Christopher Charm”

Wizard Barristers is set in 2018, where humans and wizards live together in Tokyo. While the police continue to protect the peace, wizards are tried according to magical law through Magic Prohibition Law. Wizards are taken to special courts, where they are defended by wizard barristers via the Court of Magic.

17-year-old Canadian-Japanese girl Cecil Sudo has become the youngest wizard barrister after passing the bar exam at 15. At the beginning of the series, she begins working for the Butterfly Law Offices.

The bulk of the episode focuses on Cecil and Hotaru in Canada. After being involved with the apprehension of the murder and robbery suspect from episode seven, Kaede parts ways with Cecil and Hotaru.

When Cecil and Hotaru make it to Cecil’s father’s home, a bit of information is revealed to Hotaru and the audience while Cecil goes out to buy some groceries. We learn a bit more about Cecil’s childhood in Canada, and how people were scared of her for being a Wud and how she was bullied for being half Japanese. As the conversation between Hotaru and Cecil’s father starts turning to the incident six years earlier in Japan, Cecil returns home and the subject is dropped. Later, during a conversation with Cecil, Hotaru learns that Cecil has no memory of what actually happened during the incident, and that all her parents ever told her was that Cecil’s mother killed someone in order to protect her.

When Cecil and Hotaru are out on a rowboat, a sudden storm suddenly seems to roll in, and a metamoloid comes out of the water. This leads to Cecil and Hotaru trying to fight the metamoloid with magic, and over the course of their battle, some unexpected things happen and revelations are made.

Meanwhile, the rest of the Butterfly Law Office group that’s still in Boston is out and about, taking in the beach and visiting sites around Boston. At first, this felt like filler, until Diana from Helsing takes them to a restaurant. After noticing that there’s no other customers, Diana reveals her true colors and attacks. An epic magic battle takes place, and more revelations are made.

The first half of this episode was deceptively idyllic; once it gets into the second half, it becomes incredibly intense. It turns out that I was right in my writeup of episode seven when I suspected that something was amiss in regards to Kaede. I’m not going to say what exactly she does in order to avoid providing a “spoiler,” but I will say that she’s not to be trusted. I will also add that I liked the way the storyline with Kaede ties back in with something we saw earlier in the series.

There’s one more revelation made: Inspector Shimuzu has more than a passing association with Macal. It turns out he has a direct connection with the leader of the group.  I have to admit that I didn’t see that coming.

Near the end of the episode, Cecil sees something happen that upsets her greatly, and she does something that’s rather surprising. After the fight, though, Cecil starts getting information that leads her to believe that she needs to do more research in regard to what happened six years earlier. From the preview, it appears that her goal to do more research will be a major plot point in episode nine.

With Wizard Barristers starting to wind down now, I suspect the remaining episodes are going to be just as intense as the second half of episode eight was. I’m looking forward to watching episode nine in order to find out whether or not Cecil can start learning more about what happened to her and her mother six years ago.

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