12 Days of Anime: Day 11

For today, I’m going to be focusing on manga instead of anime. In 2018, I managed to finish six manga series, and this post is going to share with you what I finished over this past year.

Black Rose Alice

In May 2018, I finally finished the Black Rose Alice manga series. At the end of it all, it was a decent enough manga series, but I wouldn’t rank it among my favorite manga. To be honest, I would only recommend this series to readers who enjoy shojo manga that features vampires, and don’t mind the fact that the series doesn’t truly have an end.

Assassination Classroom

In May 2018, I also finished the Assassination Classroom manga. This is a fantastic manga series, and I would highly recommend it to manga readers who appreciate stories with humor that evolve into something more serious as the series progresses.

Kiss of the Rose Princess

I must have been busy reading manga during May 2018, because that was also the month that I finished the Kiss of the Rose Princess series. While this isn’t a manga title that I will personally be in a hurry to read again, I think it could appeal to shojo manga readers who enjoy magical or supernatural elements in the manga stories that they read.

Say I Love You.

In July 2018, I read the final volume of Say I Love You. Overall, I enjoyed reading the series. Admittedly, it can get a little more on the saccharine side the closer it reaches its conclusion, but I found I could overlook that since I had been following these characters and had been invested in them for so long before the series took that turn. If you enjoy shojo romance manga, you might find that you enjoy Say I Love You.

xxxHoLic

In September 2018, I finished reading the final volume of xxxHoLic. Overall, this is a pretty solid series, except for the last three or four volumes. By that point, there’s time skipping going on. I understand why the time skipping is going on, but to me, it felt like the strength of the story started diminishing when the time skips began. And I admit that I’m not entirely sure if I liked the ending of the series or not. While it makes sense from what CLAMP established, I ended up feeling a little gypped.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy

In November 2018, I read the final volume of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy. For me, personally, the concept of the main character taking on a secret identity and not revealing this to the person they’re interested in kind of reminds me of the 1980’s cartoon, Jem (except for the fact that these characters are in high school, and that there’s no holographic technology used to disguise the main character). But the relationship that develops between Senri and Hime (as Shiro) doesn’t feel forced and comes across as convincing to the reader. In some respects, the ending is a predictable and maybe a little on the cliché side, but it works for the story that Minami developed over the course of the 12 volumes. But I think that adding the element of voice acting does help makes this series feel a little less like a typical high school shojo manga story.

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Manga Spotlight: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy is a manga series by Maki Minami and is published in North America by VIZ Media’s Shojo Beat imprint.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha, Inc.
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Dates: October 1, 2013-August 4, 2015

The main character of the series is a high school student named Hime Kino. When she was a little girl, she received help from voice actress Sakura Aoyama, who provided the original voice for a character named Lovely Blazer. Hime’s dream is to become a famous voice actress, so she enrolls in the prestigious Holly Academy High School, which has a voice acting department.

But it turns out Hime has a problem: she has a gruff voice that doesn’t seem to work well for female voice acting roles. In addition, she gets on the bad side of her classmate, Senri Aoyama, who turns out to be Sakura Aoyama’s son. He’s already got professional credits and looks down on the other students as simply competition to crush.

Unfortunately, Hime quickly finds herself in the Voice Acting Department stragglers group alongside Tsukino Todoroki (who speaks too softly), Sho Takayanahi (he can’t read kanji and is short-tempered), and Mitchel Zaizen (who goes by Mitchy, and has an accent as well as being full of himself). One day, the first-year stragglers group has a run-in with the second-years and are challenged to a voice drama challenge; whichever group gets the most votes from the student body wins.

But things start going wrong on the day of the challenge, but the first-year stragglers get some surprising help from Senri. And through her performance in the drama, Hime is “scouted” to be part of a recording session; unfortunately, that doesn’t go well. She also manages to raise the ire of Shuuma Kawai, a professional male idol who attends Holly Academy.

Poor Hime. Not only does she have her voice going against her, but she has to deal Senri and other students putting her down, getting punished for her failure at the voice recording session, not to mention some grief and bullying she has to deal with from Shuuma and his fangirls near the end of Volume One. Fortunately, Hime doesn’t let these obstacles get her down, due to her usually positive attitude. I also found myself chuckling a little bit at Hime’s name; Hime is Japanese for “princess,” while “Kino is German for “movie.” Princess Movie seems like an appropriate name for a female character who wants to get into voice acting!

But Yamada P., the one who scouts Hime for the voice acting role, doesn’t give up on her. He’s rough and tough, though. And to top it off, Yamada insists that for voice acting, Hime take on the persona of a boy named Shiro. She’s clumsy as Shiro at first, but Mizuki, a member of AQUA who knows Hime’s secret, encourages her along the way and gives her support. And along the way, Shiro becomes friends with Senri Kudo, and Hime has to hide the fact that Shiro is actually her from Senri.

Over the course of the series, a love triangle develops. Hime is in love with Senri, but he doesn’t seem to feel anything for her… until after he befriends Shiro (and he is confused as to why he would be interested in who he thinks is a boy). Mizuki, meanwhile, seems to develop feelings for Hime, and becomes jealous when Hime is around Senri. Of course, this is part of what makes Voice Over! Seiyu Academy a shojo manga title.

For me, personally, the concept of the main character taking on a secret identity and not revealing this to the person they’re interested in kind of reminds me of the 1980’s cartoon, Jem (except for the fact that these characters are in high school, and that there’s no holographic technology used to disguise the main character).

But the relationship that develops between Senri and Hime (as Shiro) doesn’t feel forced and comes across as convincing to the reader. In some respects, the ending is a predictable and maybe a little on the cliché side, but it works for the story that Minami developed over the course of the 12 volumes. But I think that adding the element of voice acting does help makes this series feel a little less like a typical high school shojo manga story.

Art-wise, there’s a lot of a typical shojo look to the characters and backgrounds, such as cute-looking characters, and sparkly and flowery screentones. However, in order to depict Hime’s rough voice, Minami is having to utilize a look and aesthetic that looks more like it should be a shonen manga that also tends to look rougher than the rest of the series does. Mixing these two aesthetics helps to give Voice Over! Seiyu Academy a more “unique” look in comparison to its shojo manga contemporaries.

I think readers who are fans of shojo manga will be able to appreciate Voice Over! Seiyu Academy.

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Manga Review: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 11

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 11 focuses on Hime Kino, a high school girl who is part of Holly Academy High School’s voice acting department. She has a gruff voice that doesn’t work well for female voice acting roles, but she’s been given a chance at fame by posing as a boy named Shiro in order to get work. But having this double identity is causing problems for Hime.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 11
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: June 2, 2015

Volume 11 begins with audiences falling in love with Shiro through Hime’s improved acting in Cruel Octalia. But since no one has seen Shiro’s face, the public becomes fascinated with wanting to see what he looks like. Hime’s manager cooks up a publicity scheme to build off of the frenzy, which includes involving the band AQUA. But there’s drama involved, since both members of AQUA know Shiro’s true identity but not both of them like Hime. Mizuki really likes Hime, but Shuuma feels that she’s getting in the way. But when Hime ultimately has to help Shuuma out of a predicament, this forces Shuuma to rethink his opinion of Hime. I thought this was some nice character development for Shuuma, and maybe he’ll start treating her better than he had been up to now.

A fair bit of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 11 focuses on Hime as she discovers that she’s falling in love with Senri. But Hime’s feelings become complicated when Mizuki confesses that he’s in love with her. I had to feel sorry for Hime during this volume, because she was so confused over this whole situation. But she ultimately made the decision that I thought she was going to, and I appreciated the scenes that takes place right after Hime gives Mizuki her answer. I felt that Mizuki and Hime’s reactions afterward were both realistic.

Senri is also shown trying to figure out how he feels about Hime. Right near the end of the volume, Senri discovers what Hime’s home life is really like, and he tries his best to comfort her. Over the course of this volume, we see that Senri is trying to drop the walls he’s put up around himself and be around others more. To me, this scene where Senri tries to comfort Hime is the culmination of all the work he’s put into changing himself. This scene also seems to hint that perhaps Hime and Senri could potentially become a couple.

Volume 11 ends on a surprising note, when Hime’s manager tells her that she has one final role she’ll play as Shiro before retiring the persona. Hime is shocked to discover that she’ll be starring in a production alongside her idol and Senri’s mother, Sakura Aoyama. It’s hard enough for Hime to keep from fangirling since she’s disguised as Shiro when she meets Sakura, but the situation becomes complicated when Sakura says she wants Shiro to live with her like he’s her real son until they finish recording. This is where Volume 11 ends, so there’s a lot of potential for so much to go wrong over the course of Volume 12. It’s going to be hard enough for Hime to hide the fact that she’s really a girl, but since Senri doesn’t know about her double identity, she needs to make sure he doesn’t find out she’s living with his estranged mother while disguising herself as a boy. I already want to read Volume 12 in order to find out what’s going to happen, but I have to wait until it’s released.

This volume continues utilizing the cute look that’s been there since the beginning of the series. There’s also plenty of sparkly screentones being used in many of the panels in this volume. But at this point, the story has become so riveting that it’s easy to overlook just how sparkly the backgrounds can get at times.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 11 does a great job continuing from where Volume 10 left off. Relationships are a major factor in this volume, and this should have a strong appeal to readers of the series who enjoy that particular angle of shojo manga.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 10

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 10 focuses on Hime Kino, a high school student attending Holly Academy High School. She’s part of the school’s voice acting department, but she has a gruff voice that doesn’t work well for female voice acting roles. This lands her into the Voice Acting Department’s stragglers group for the first-year students. Hime also has run-ins with Senri Aoyama, the son of an actress who already has a voice acting career underway. Through some interesting circumstances, Hime finds herself being recruited as a voice actor, but she has to agree to be a male voice actor because of her voice. Hime takes on the identity of Shiro and begins leading a double life. As Shiro, Hime finds that she’s able to get closer to Senri.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 10
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: April 7, 2015

Volume 10 opens with Shiro getting a rather low approval rating from fans of Cruel Octalia for his performance of Yukiru. And if that wasn’t enough, Hime was told not to spend time with Senri as Shiro outside of recording sessions for Cruel Octalia. She decides to try to become friends with Senri as Hime, but he acts just the same toward her as he had before.

Senri keeps contacting Shiro about coming over to hang out, and Shiro has to finally say that they can’t be around each other until Shiro becomes a better voice actor. Senri tries to act as if this doesn’t bother him, but Hime notices him going around school with a fake smile. After this happens, Hime spends a bit of Volume 10 dealing with two issues: figuring out how to improve her voice for the role she’s playing and trying to find a way to help Senri feel like he hasn’t been abandoned by Shiro.

Considering all of the issues Senri had as a child when it came to making friends, it’s understandable that Shiro’s rejection hit him pretty hard. We see that Senri starts acting differently as well, but it’s actually thanks to an outburst that he makes while Shiro is recording lines that gives some much needed advice for how Shiro’s performances can improve. With this advice, Shiro’s acting improves, and the approval rating for Shiro’s acting goes up among the viewers of Cruel Octalia.

Back at school, Hime manages to get Senri into her group for their second semester final. Senri, feeling a little pressured to start bringing friends home, invites the group to come to his house to work on the project. Hime starts slipping up and having a hard time keeping the Hime and Shiro personalities separated. She keeps blurting out things that only Shiro would know about Senri, but fortunately for Hime, he doesn’t seem to have figured out that Hime and Shiro are one and the same. I have a strong suspicion that Hime is going to make a major slip here at some point and that her double identity will be revealed. At such a point that happens, I can’t see Senri taking this well, and that his already rather low opinion of Hime could end up becoming even lower.

We also get to see Mizuki from idol unit AQUA in a couple of quick scenes in Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 10 and they make it explicitly clear that Mizuki has developed feelings for Hime. With the way the story seems to be progressing, though, I see Hime ultimately falling for Senri. I think she basically has at this point, but she can’t quite admit this to herself yet.

What I’ve really enjoyed about Voice Over! Seiyu Academy is the fact that this is a shojo manga that’s not developing a straightforward love triangle. While Mizuki is interested in Hime, Senri is trying to be friends with a disguised Hime and he doesn’t appear to have any blatant romantic interest in the protagonist. The “gender bending” hidden identity is also a nice touch.

When it comes to the art, Voice Over! Seiyu Academy has a lot of the typical shojo look to it, which includes cute-looking characters and the usage of sparkly and flowery screentones. But the story in the series is so engaging that the reader can overlook the average look of the art.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy should have a strong appeal to readers who enjoy shojo manga, especially readers who may have an interest in voice acting. Long time readers of the series should also be pleased with the progression of the story and the relationships that takes place during the course of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 10.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Eight Manga Make YALSA’s Top 10 Graphic Novels for Teens for 2015

The American Library Association’s (ALA’s) Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) released its 2015 list of Great Graphic Novels for Teens. Eight manga titles are included on the list. Mamoru Hosoda and Yu’s Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki also ranked in the Top Ten teen graphic novels overall for 2015.

  • Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki by Mamoru Hosoda and Yu
  • All You Need Is Kill by Ryosuke Takeuchi and Takeshi Obata
  • My Little Monster (GN 1-3) by Robico
  • My Love Story!! (GN 1) by Kazune Kawahara and Aruko
  • Seraph of the End: Vampire Reign (GN 1-2) by Takaya Kagami and Yamato Yamamoto
  • Summer Wars (GN 1-2) by Mamoru Hosoda and Igura Sugimoto
  • Voice Over! Seiyu Academy (GN 1-5) by Maki Minami
  • World Trigger (GN 1-2) by Daisuke Ashihara

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume Nine

The main character of the series is Hime Kino, a high school student attending Holly Academy High School and is part of the school’s voice acting department. Unfortunately, she has a gruff voice that doesn’t seem to work well for female voice acting roles, which lands her into the Voice Acting Department’s stragglers group for the first-year students. Also in the group are Tsukino Todoroki (who speaks too softly), Sho Takayanahi (he can’t read kanji and is short-tempered), and Mitchel Zaizen (who goes by Mitchy, and has an accent as well as being full of himself). Hime also has run-ins with Senri Aoyama, the son of an actress named Sakura Aoyama; he already has a voice acting career underway. But as time goes on, Senri surprises himself when he helps Hime out of situations.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 9
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: February 3, 2015

Volume Nine continues with Senri’s flashback that began near the end of Volume Eight. We see that Senti inadvertently hurt someone else who he thought was pretending to be his friend. After the flashback, Senri thinks he has to break off contact with Shiro in order to avoid hurting him. But Shiro is persuasive when he says that Senri’s omelet rice is tasty and full of heart.

In the previous volume, I had suspected that Shiro and Hime were one and the same, although nothing blatantly stated it. If I hadn’t skipped ahead seven volumes, I probably would have already known this face before it was blatantly stated in Volume Nine. This is a disguise that Hime has to take on in order to get male voice acting roles, due to gruff voice. If it were to come out that Shiro is really a girl, then Hime’s voice acting career would be over.

Unfortunately Shiro has never told Senri that he’s also a voice actor, so when the two bump into each other at a recording session for the same anime, things get awkward. Senri tries to act like he’s not close with Shiro at all.

With all that deception going on, there’s also Mizuki Haruyama keeping an eye on Hime, since she’s with his agency. We see Mizuki becoming jealous when he realizes just how close Hime has been with Senri while disguised as Shiro. The reader sees in his thoughts that he’s in love with Hime, but he hasn’t said a word to her about his feelings.

What I’m finding fascinating with Voice Over! Seiyu Academy is that it’s a shojo manga that’s not developing the straightforward love triangle. At this point, you have Mizuki interested in Hime, while Senri is trying to be friends with the disguised Hime and doesn’t seem to have any romantic interest in the protagonist. The “gender bending” hidden identity is also a nice touch, although I have a feeling that this is seriously going to come back and bite Hime in the butt somehow as the series progresses. I can only imagine how hurt and angry Senri would feel at such a time he learned the truth about Shiro’s identity. The fact that Shiro hid the fact of being a voice actor from him was hard enough on Senri, so I’d imagine finding out this friendship he’s trying to cultivate is based on a lie would hurt tremendously.

Even though I’ve only read Volumes One, Eight, and Nine of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy, what I’ve read has interested me enough that I want to chase down Volumes Two through Seven in order to have a more complete picture of what’s brought the series to this point. As I read more volumes of the series, I’ve come to gain a stronger appreciation for it.

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Manga Review: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume Eight

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume Eight is a manga by Maki Minami. This volume was published in North America by VIZ Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2014. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 8
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: December 2, 2014

The main character of the series is Hime Kino, a high school student attending Holly Academy High School and is part of the school’s voice acting department. Unfortunately, she has a gruff voice that doesn’t seem to work well for female voice acting roles, which lands her into the Voice Acting Department’s stragglers group for the first-year students. Also in the group are Tsukino Todoroki (who speaks too softly), Sho Takayanahi (he can’t read kanji and is short-tempered), and Mitchel Zaizen (who goes by Mitchy, and has an accent as well as being full of himself).

Hime also has run-ins with Senri Aoyama, the son of an actress named Sakura Aoyama; he already has a voice acting career underway. But as time goes on, Senri surprises himself when he helps Hime out of situations.

Volume Eight sees the stragglers group getting ready to record the audio for a lunchtime broadcast. Tsukino has been given a lead role, but she’s unsure about whether or not she can pull it off. It doesn’t help that she’s thinking over what her teacher said about using her voice to convey her feelings in order for Tsukino to try to make more friends. After reading this part of the manga, I thought that Minami did a great job conveying this story, and ultimately ended it with Tsukino making the first step toward gaining confidence for using her voice. I thought this was much more realistic than having Tsukino overcoming all of her doubts right away. While it may have been one small step for Tsukino, it’s still some kind of development for her character.

Senri seems to have become friends with a boy named Shiro, who’s just gotten a semi-regular role on an anime. Senri invites Shiro over to have dinner, determined to make Shiro’s favorite dish, omelet rice. This first attempt doesn’t work out, but Senri makes several attempts over time, determined to make the perfect rice omelet.

It seems like a nice gesture, until the reader comes to learn that Senri actually wants to quit being friends with Shiro after he succeeds in making the rice omelet. Senri has second thoughts, but then suddenly asks Shiro what he would do if his best friend was just pretending to like him. But before Shiro can answer, Senri tries to cut off the conversation and slams the door. Of course, as we see later, Shiro is weirded out over what happened.

The remainder of the volume provides Senri’s backstory, from how his parents met, to how his mother had raised him to treat life as if he’s an actor, and how this made things very awkward for him once he entered school. The backstory includes Senri making friends with a boy in elementary school, but ruined the friendship when Senri assumed that the two of them were “playing buddies.” This last part helped to explain Senri’s actions earlier with Shiro.

But not only does the backstory explain what happened earlier in this volume, it also explains Senri’s attitude and behavior that he showed when we first met him back in Volume One. I have to say that by the end of this volume, I was able to see Senri as a sympathetic character after reading his backstory. It also explains why Senri doesn’t think very highly of his mother, either. Considering how much Hime idolizes Sakura, it also shows the reader that Sakura is nowhere near the role model that Hime thinks she is.

As of this writing, I’ve only read Volumes One and Eight of this series. Fortunately, I was able to follow what was going on for the most part, even though I skipped several volumes. My main confusion at first came from Shiro, but I was lucky that this volume explained how Shiro and Senri had met. Outside of that, though, I didn’t feel hopefully lost due to the skip.

But after reading Volume Eight, it makes me want to chase down Volumes Two through Seven at some point in order to find out what happened to bring the story to where it is in Volume Eight. This volume also increased the appreciation I had after reading the first volume.

If you enjoy reading shojo manga and also have some kind of appreciation for voice acting, then you’ll probably enjoy reading Voice Over! Seiyu Academy.

I wrote this review after reading a review copy of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume Eight that was provided to me by VIZ Media.

Additional posts about Voice Over! Seiyu Academy:

Manga Review: Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume One

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume One is a manga by Maki Minami. This volume was published in North America by VIZ Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the series so far, I would agree with this rating.

Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume 1
Written by: Maki Minami
Publisher: Hakusensha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 1, 2013

The main character of the series is a high school student named Hime Kino. When she was a little girl, she received help from voice actress Sakura Aoyama, who provided the original voice for a character named Lovely Blazer. Hime’s dream is to become a famous voice actress, so she enrolls in the prestigious Holly Academy High School, which has a voice acting department.

But it turns out Hime has a problem: she has a gruff voice that doesn’t seem to work well for female voice acting roles. In addition, she gets on the bad side of her classmate, Senri Aoyama, who turns out to be Sakura Aoyama’s son. He’s already got professional credits and looks down on the other students as simply competition to crush.

Unfortunately, Hime quickly finds herself in the Voice Acting Department stragglers group alongside Tsukino Todoroki (who speaks too softly), Sho Takayanahi (he can’t read kanji and is short-tempered), and Mitchel Zaizen (who goes by Mitchy, and has an accent as well as being full of himself). One day, the first-year stragglers group has a run-in with the second-years and are challenged to a voice drama challenge; whichever group gets the most votes from the student body wins.

But things start going wrong on the day of the challenge, but the first-year stragglers get some surprising help from Senri. And through her performance in the drama, Hime is “scouted” to be part of a recording session; unfortunately, that doesn’t go well. She also manages to raise the ire of Shuuma Kawai, a professional male idol who attends Holly Academy.

Poor Hime. Not only does she have her voice going against her, but she has to put up Senri and other students putting her down, getting punished for her failure at the voice recording session, not to mention some grief and bullying she has to deal with from Shuuma and his fangirls near the end of Volume One. Fortunately, Hime doesn’t let these obstacles get her down, due to her usually positive attitude. I also found myself chuckling a little bit at Hime’s name; Hime is Japanese for “princess,” while “Kino is German for “movie.” Princess Movie seems like an appropriate name for a female character who wants to get into voice acting!

While this series may be set at a high school and already seems to be laying the foundation for a potential love triangle, this series adds the element of voice acting to help it feel less like a typical high school shojo manga story. There’s also an interesting mix of characters for this series, although I have to admit that several of them feel more like “character types” than actual characters. Hopefully, as this series progresses, development will take place that will help develop the “character type” personalities into more dynamic characters.

Art-wise, there’s a lot of a typical shojo look to the characters and backgrounds, such as cute-looking characters, and sparkly and flowery screentones. However, in order to depict Hime’s rough voice, Minami is having to utilize a look and aesthetic that looks more like it should be a shonen manga that also tends to look rougher than the rest of the volume does. Mixing these two aesthetics helps to give Voice Over! Seiyu Academy a more “unique” look in comparison to its shojo manga contemporaries.

I have to admit that I wasn’t entirely sure about this series when I read the blurb on the back. But I’m glad I gave it a chance, though, because I discovered that Voice Over! Seiyu Academy has an interesting start for its story. Hopefully Minami is able to follow through on this potential that I see as the series progresses. I’d definitely be interested in reading more of the series in order find out what happens.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Voice Over! Seiyu Academy Volume One that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Voice Over! Seiyu Academy:

VIZ Media’s Top Ten Digital Manga for the Week of August 5th, 2014

VIZ Media has announced the company’s top ten selling digital manga for the week of August 5, 2014:

1. Bleach Volume 61
2. Rosario + Vampire Season II Volume 13
3. Toriko Volume 23
4. D.Gray-man Volume 24
5. Nura: Rise of the Yokai Clan Volume 22
6. JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure Part 3 Volume 9
7. JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure Part 3 Volume 10
8. Naruto Volume 66
9. Voice Over!: Seiyu Academy Volume 6
10. Kaze Hikaru Volume 22

New Manga Series Debut on VIZ’s Digital Platform

VIZ Media has added a digital manga update on VIZMANGA.com, and the titles in the update are available for digital download through the VIZ MANGA app for the Apple iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch, Android-powered smartphones, as well as for NOOK tablets and devices.

New manga series debuting this month from Viz Media’s Shonen Jump and Shonen Jump Advanced imprints include:

  • Cowa! (one-shot)
  • Muhyo & Roji’s Bureau of Supernatural Investigation
  • Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium World

New manga from the Shojo Beat imprint include:

  • Aishiteruze Baby
  • Boys Over Flowers
  • Voice Over: Seiyu Academy

The first volume of X also debuts in a 3-in-1 edition.