Vertical to Offer Manga for e-Readers

Anime News Network is reporting that Vertical, Inc. is releasing Kou Yaginuma’s Twin Spica, Shu Okimoto’s The Drops of God, and Nobuaki Tadano’s 7 Billion Needles manga for e-readers this spring. These releases will be multi-platform with compatibility for the Amazon Kindle, iBookstore, and NOOK.

Other series may be added in the future depending on license agreements.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 12

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 12 by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume 12 is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2012. There isn’t any kind of rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are 12 or 13 years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 12
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: March 6, 2012

Volume 12 is the final volume of Twin Spica, so Yaginuma is completely focused on wrapping up the story. In this volume it’s revealed who goes on to their final year in the Space School. It’s also revealed what happens to all the characters and what paths they end up going in.

For the most part, I liked what Yaginuma did in order to wrap up the story. There were, in my opinion, a couple of loose threads that remained at the end. In an “author’s note” at the end of the volume, Yaginuma himself admitted that there were some things he didn’t touch on (although they didn’t match what I felt hadn’t been resolved). He also encourages the reader to use their imagination to fill in the missing pieces.

There were three additional stories included in this final volume. The first is labeled as, “Three-Dimensional Spica.” In this story, Yaginuma is seen interacting with some of the characters in the Twin Spica series. All I can figure is that this story depicts some of the things that went through his head as he worked on the series; otherwise, it really doesn’t make much sense.

The other two stories are both labeled as “Another Spica.” In the first, Yaginuma is ruminating about the fact that he’s gotten older. The second serves as a kind of “author’s note.” Both of these provide an insight into the mangaka who created and wrote the Twin Spica series, as well as some of the things involved with working on the manga.

I really enjoyed the Twin Spica series, and I’m a little sad to see it come to an end. However, Yaginuma ultimately told the story he needed to tell with these characters; there really wasn’t anywhere else he could take it that would have been relevant to the overall thread that ran through the series. By the time the chapters in Volume 12 were published in Japan, Yaginuma had been working on Twin Spica for nine years, so I think he was at a point where he was ready to bring the story to its conclusion.

Twin Spica is a great series, and I would highly recommend it to manga readers who enjoy reading stories about characters wanting to achieve a dream and trying to do what it takes to make that dream a reality.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume 12 that my husband and I purchased.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 11

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 11 by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume 11 is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2012. There isn’t any kind of rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are 12 or 13 years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 11
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: January 10, 2012

Volume 11 is the penultimate volume for Twin Spica, and a lot of change is happening. Not only are the characters undergoing changes due to their circumstances, but the tone of the series has also noticeably changed. In previous volumes, even when the characters were experiencing stress or drama, there will still an undercurrent of positivity running through the series. However, after the event that happens at the end of Volume 10, that undercurrent of positivity all but disappears. I believe this is due to both the event that happens at the end of Volume 10, as well as the fact that the characters know that the end of their time at the Space School may be drawing near if they aren’t selected to continue on to the final year of the program. In other words, reality is hitting these characters head-on. After my 14-year-old daughter read this volume, she commented to me that this was the most depressing volume of Twin Spica that she had read.

My daughter also made another observation: at this point in the series, you’re seeing less and less of Mr. Lion, the ghost of one of the astronauts that was killed when The Lion crashed. As I explained to her, this is more than likely symbolic of the fact that Asumi is growing up and needing to rely on Mr. Lion less and less.

I know I’m not talking too much about the plot for this particular volume, but it really would be difficult to do that without giving away major spoilers. However, what I will say is that Yaginuma was able to tell this portion of the story in a compelling way, and found the right balance of drama and humor to convey what the characters are going through during this particular plot point. Volume 11 also has an ending that’s an emotional equivalent of a kick in the gut, but this ending is also a cliffhanger. I really want to read Volume 12 so I can see not only how the story continues, but how the overall story will reach its conclusion.

There are two additional stories included in this volume, and they are both “Another Spica” stories. Both of these are about Kou Yaginuma, the author of Twin Spica. As far as I can tell, both of these stories are set during the time that he was writing Twin Spica, because there are direct references to the characters in the series, rather than seeing characters drawn into the story who happen to resemble the characters. The “Another Spica” stories that have appeared in the later volumes of Twin Spica have been better than the “Another Spica” stories from the earlier volumes in the series.

In some respects, I’m disappointed that the story of Twin Spica is almost over, because I’ve really been enjoying the series. However, from a storytelling perspective, I can tell that the series is at a point where it’s ready to wrap up. I can’t wait to get a hold of Volume 12 to see how Yaginuma brings his wonderful series to an end.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume 11 that my husband and I purchased.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 10

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume 10 by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume 10 is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. There isn’t any kind of rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are 12 or 13 years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 10
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: November 1, 2011

Volume 10 opens with Asumi and her classmates undergoing outboard training. As part of their training, they have to try to complete tasks faster than the humanoid robots that are being developed at the facility where the training is taking place. By sharing notes and observations, Asumi and her friends are determined to try to beat the robots and prove that humans are still necessary for space missions.

Summer vacation rolls around not too long after their training, and Asumi and her friends decide to spend another summer at Asumi’s hometown of Yuigahama. While in Yuigahama, the group decides that every summer, they will gather together in Yuigahama. During their vacation, Shu learns that he has been accepted as the Japanese astronaut going to America for a mission. Marika also reveals the truth about her illness to her friends.

The most compelling part of this volume is right at the very end, where something very unexpected happens. I don’t want to provide a spoiler and say what it is, but when I talked about it with my 14-year-old daughter, I described it to her as “the emotional equivalent of a kick in the gut.” This event that ends Volume 10 is so major, and it makes me want to read Volume 11 in order to see the ramifications of this event have on both the characters and the progression of the story.

There is one additional story included in this manga, and it’s a shorter “Another Spica” than usual. “Another Spica” focuses on Kou Yaginuma, the creator of the Twin Spica manga series. This “Another Spica” feels much more relevant than many of the “Another Spica” stories that appeared in earlier volumes of the series. This one seems to be sharing Yaginuma’s inspiration for some of the common sites seen throughout the series.

Just as I think that Twin Spica can’t get any better, it’s able to build in a believable way and continue to tell a strong story. Of all the volumes I’ve read so far, I think this one has a very strong cliffhanger ending. I know I’ve said with a couple of the previous volumes that you could start feeling that the end of the series is near, but with this volume, it’s blatant that the story is quickly heading to its conclusion. There’s still two volumes remaining in the series, so I’m very interested to see how the rest of the story will evolve and play out. I feel safe in saying that I am hooked on the Twin Spica manga series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume 10 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Nine

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Nine by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Nine is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. There isn’t any kind of a rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 9
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: September 6, 2011

This volume of Twin Spica sees Asumi and her friends beginning their junior year at the Tokyo Space School. A new character named Mikan Tokushima, a freshman student who moves into the dorm that Asumi and Marika live at. Kasane Shibata, an old friend of Asumi’s from Yugihama who was referenced in earlier volumes of Twin Spica, also makes an appearance.

A former teacher at the Tokyo Space School who had tried to have Asumi removed from the school, returns to try to get some answers about the accident with The Lion. This volume sees this teacher finally making peace with Asumi’s father; we also learn that he has an indirect connection with another character in the story.

Just like the previous volumes in the series, the ninth volume of Twin Spica was a compelling read, and I just couldn’t put it down. As I saw that more pieces were beginning to fall into place, I started asking some new questions. There’s still three volumes left of Twin Spica, and as a reader, I can tell that the end is getting closer. Hopefully, these new questions I’m starting to ask will be answered in the remaining volumes.

There are two additional stories included in this volume, and they are both “Another Spica,” which focus on Kou Yaginuma, the creator of the Twin Spica manga. The first story sees Yaginuma finally taking the steps he needed to in order to walk away from his part-time job and try to make is a manga artist. The second story shows Yaginuma at his part-time job, and I think with this one, he’s trying to share the inspiration he had for the character of Kasane. Of the “Another Spica” stories that have appeared in Twin Spica, I believe that these two are the best ones I’ve read.

I continue to be impressed by the story in Twin Spica, and I’m really rooting for Asumi to be able to succeed and fulfill her dream of going into space. I also have appreciated how Yaginuma has come to make me care about characters that I initially hadn’t cared about when I first met them. Twin Spica is a wonderfully told coming-of-age story, and as a reader, I’ve really enjoyed watching these characters as they have grown up over the course of the series. I can’t wait to read more of Twin Spica in order to see how much more growth will happen for these characters as the series is winding down to its conclusion.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Nine that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Eight

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Eight by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Eight is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. There isn’t any kind of rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 8
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: July 12, 2011

This volume of Twin Spica is basically a turning point for many of the main characters in the series. Asumi finds herself having to say goodbye to the planetarium that she liked to visit, as well as to a character she had become friends with. Asumi also finds herself wrestling with the fact that she is wishing that things would stay as they are and starting to fear what the future will hold, since they’re now starting into their final year where they know the group of friends will still be together at the Tokyo Space School.

Shu is invited to apply for an astronaut position in America that’s being opened up for a Japanese astronaut. He first has to struggle with whether or not he potentially wants to become separated from his friends, and if he does, how he will overcome the obstacle of getting his father’s signature in order to have permission to take the test and apply. We also find out a little more about Shu and his past as he’s wrestling with these isues.

On accident, Asumi and Marika learn that Kei has feelings for Shu; however, neither have let on to her that they know. In this volume, it appears that Fuchuya has come to realize that he has feelings for Asumi.

This volume of Twin Spica was a compelling read, and I really didn’t want to have to put it down. So much is going on that really develops these characters even further than they’d already been developed previously. Knowing that there’s still four more volumes of Twin Spica to go, I’m very curious to see what will be happening to these characters before the story reaches its conclusion.

In addition to the main story, there are three additional stories included in this volume: “Giovanni’s Ticket,” “Guide to Cherry Blossoms,” and “Another Spica.” “Giovanni’s Ticket” is the shortest of the three, and it takes place during Asumi and Fuchuya’s childhood. Fuchuya has built a trolley, and he, Asumi, and another girl go for a ride on the tracks. It’s a simple little story, and I’m not entirely sure how much this really adds to the Twin Spica universe; perhaps this story will be mentioned and become important in one of the last four volumes of the series.

“Guide to Cherry Blossoms” sees a young woman named Kasumi Suzuki trying to find an art museum displaying artwork done by a former classmate of hers. The bulk of the story is a flashback to Kasumi’s time in the ninth grade when she knew this person. Kasumi is designed to look like an older version of Asumi, and a character appears who looks like an older version of Fuchuya. It takes a couple of ideas from Twin Spica and utilizes them for a different story. It’s a sweet little story, but it’s not directly related to Twin Spica.

“Another Spica” focuses on the mangaka, Kou Yaginuma. It has him showing a manga he drew to a supervisor of his at his part-time job, and the manga he shows is Fireworks: 1990, which is a revised title to one of the additional stories included in the first volume of Twin Spica. While the “Another Spica” short stories are my least favorite part of the Twin Spica volumes, this particular “Another Spica” story is probably the best one I’ve seen yet.

I really enjoy reading Twin Spica. After I finish a volume, I want to read the next volume to find out what happens to the characters. In some respects, it’s a little disappointing to know that there’s only more four volumes; however, from how the story has been progressing, twelve volumes should be enough to tell a satisfying story. I hope that when I finish reading the twelfth volume that I will be proven correct.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Eight that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Seven

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Seven by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Seven is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. There isn’t any kind of rating printed anywhere on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 7
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: May 3, 2011

This volume of Twin Spica sees Asumi and her friends going to her hometown to spend some time there during their summer vacation. It’s during this trip that the truth about Marika is finally revealed. It’s an explanation that makes a lot of sense, and it also makes you understand why Marika has acted the way she has up to this point in the series. Asumi and the others actually seem to accept this news rather easily; in fact, it appears that Kei is more willing to try to be friends with Marika after this revelation. This section of Volume Seven also sees a little more backstory revealed for Asumi’s father.

When the group returns to their studies at the Tokyo Space School, they go through more training. While this is going on, Asumi runs into Kiriu, who is practicing playing the harmonica before a performance he will be giving. Kiriu invites Asumi to come, and she accepts. Suddenly, Asumi and her classmates are whisked away for a surprise training exercise, which is scheduled to last past Kiriu’s concert.

I really appreciate how Yaginuma has handled the relationships between Asumi and her group of friends. While it’s been hinted at in the past that Fuchuya is interested in Asumi, the jealousy he has is more apparent in this volume when he sees Asumi and Kiriu together. I was also impressed by the teamwork displayed between Asumi, Marika, and Kei during the training exercise. I also liked how Yaginuma also utilized images from some of the extra stories that appeared in earlier volumes of Twin Spica; I thought this was a nice touch, especially since they were relevant to help explain what Fuchuya was thinking.

One thing that caught my eye in this volume was the title page for Chapter 38. Asumi is sitting in front of a sign that has the last names for the three female characters on it: “Kamogawa, Oumi, Ukita.” The names are displayed in a list, and looking at the first three letters, it spells out “Kou” (the first name of the mangaka). I had never caught the fact that the first letter for the girls’ last names make up the letters in the author’s first name before, so this really amused me when I saw it.

There are two additional stories included at the end of this volume, and they are both “Another Spica” stories. These stories focus on the mangaka himself, and sometimes elements from Twin Spica are included in these stories. They’re still my least favorite part of these manga volumes, and I still have as of yet to determine if these “Another Spica” stories truly have any relevance to the main Twin Spica series.

I have truly fallen in love with the characters are story of Twin Spica, and I can’t wait to see where the story will go to next. If you’ve read and enjoyed the previous six volumes of Twin Spica, then I believe you’ll enjoy Volume Seven as much as I did.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Seven that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Six

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Six by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Six is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2011. There isn’t any kind of rating printed on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 6
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: March 1, 2011

This volume of Twin Spica continues with the survival training exercise for Asumi and her friends that was introduced in Volume Five. After the exercise, we see more interaction between Asumi and Kiriu, the young man she started becoming friends with in the previous volume.

Marika’s character development continues in this volume, and with the hints that are dropped in this volume, I believe I have an idea of what the situation is for her. And if I’m right, it could be a very interesting development, especially when her friends find out the truth. Asumi might be able to accept it, but I’m not sure how the rest of their friends would feel about it. I suspect this is a topic that will be explored in later volumes of the series.

The character of Shu Suzuki also receives some development in this volume. While previous volumes have hinted that he comes from a well-to-do family, it hadn’t been explained prior to this why he lives on his own in a run-down home. It was nice to finally get a little more background on this character, because it makes it a little easier to understand him and to want to care about him.

There’s also a small section of the story devoted to a guest speaker who comes to the Tokyo Space School. This guest speaker is able to help provide more backstory for Mr. Lion, the ghost of an astronaut who was part of The Lion’s doomed mission that only Asumi can see.

There are also two additional stories included in this volume: “Tiny, Tiny Aqua Star” and “Another Spica.” “Tiny, Tiny Aqua Star” provides more backstory for Asumi during her elementary school years. In this story, some of the other girls in Asumi’s class pick on her because she can’t prove that she can see the astronaut ghost. We also see Fuchuya’s grandfather giving Asumi some of the sparklers that he makes to help cheer her up; this is something that was referenced near the end of the main story in this volume of Twin Spica, so it was nice to see it show up in this flashback story. “Tiny, Tiny Aqua Star” takes an interesting turn after the mother of one of the girls taunting Asumi passes away.

“Another Spica” is still the author’s way of trying to insert himself into the Twin Spica universe. He’s basically interacting with people who look similar to the characters, and they also have similar names. He will occasionally see Asumi and Mr. Lion, and in this story, he has a brief interaction with Asumi. This is still my least favorite part of the Twin Spica volumes.

Now that I’m getting further along into Twin Spica, it’s been great to see how much the characters and their backstories are starting to dovetail together. What makes this even better for the reader is the fact that a lot of the time, the characters don’t realize that their stories are interconnected; this helps the reader feel like they know a secret that the characters don’t. As a writer, I can see a number of possibilities that can happen as the characters start learning some of these various “secrets,” and that makes me want to continue reading to find out what happens to these characters. Since Volume Six is the halfway point for the Twin Spica series, I suspect that these various story possibilities will be coming into play very soon.

If you’ve read and enjoyed Twin Spica up to this point, I’m very confident that you’ll also enjoy Volume Six.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Six that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Five

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Five by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Five is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2010. There isn’t any kind of rating printed on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 5
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: January 4, 2011

This volume of Twin Spica sees Asumi and her friends starting into their second year at the Tokyo Space School, and there are two storylines taking place. The first has to do with Asumi and Kiriu, the boy she met during the protest on the ferry back in Volume Four. Asumi has lost a rocket keychain. Kiriu knew it was hers and planned to return it to her, but some boys at his school destroyed it and threw it out into a nearby field. During this volume, Asumi and Kiriu finally get to know each other, and it appears that a friendship could begin to develop in future volumes of the series.

The other storyline has to do with Mr. Lion, the spirit of one of the astronauts who died when The Lion crashed, reminiscing on his first love. The girl he sees looks remarkably like Marika, Asumi’s friend at the Tokyo Space School. From the clues presented in this volume, it appears that the girl he’s remembering and Marika are indeed one and the same. But since there should be a significant age difference between Mr. Lion and Asumi, I’m now left with a question: “How?” I’m waiting with bated breath to read more of the series in order to learn what exactly is going on with Marika, because the backstory that is developing for her is a fascinating one.

There’s only one additional story included in this volume of Twin Spica, and it’s “Another Spica.” Of the additional stories I’ve seen in these volumes, “Another Spica” have been my least favorite, because they feel more like they’re being done to give the manga author a chance to be a part of the world of Twin Spica. I’m really hoping that it turns out I’m wrong about this, and that there’s actually a point to the “Another Spica” shorts.

Yaginuma continues to impress me with his character development and his writing. He’s writing the story in such a way that it’s not only dramatic, but it keeps the reader interested in what’s happening and trying to guess where the story will go. I really liked how much development Yaginuma put into Kiriu in this volume of Twin Spica, because Kiriu has now become a character that the reader can empathize with and start caring about. I have a feeling that Asumi and Kiriu’s developing friendship will be adding a new layer to the story.

I have really been enjoying Twin Spica, and I think it’s a manga series that should be read and given a chance by readers.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Five that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica:

Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Four

Article first published as Manga Review: Twin Spica Volume Four by Kou Yaginuma on Blogcritics.

Twin Spica Volume Four is a manga by Kou Yaginuma, and it was published in North America by Vertical, Inc. in 2010. There isn’t any kind of a rating printed on this volume, but I would personally recommend Twin Spica to manga readers who are twelve or thirteen years of age and older.

Twin Spica Volume 4
Written by: Kou Yaginuma
Publisher: Media Factory
English Publisher: Vertical
Release Date: November 2, 2010

At the beginning of Volume Four, Asumi and her friends begin their actual training for going into space. They’re seen going through a couple of different exercises to simulate zero-g gravity.

A major plot point happens when Asumi and her classmates go to see a shuttle launch. On their way back to school on the ferry, Asumi sees some protestors, with signs protesting the space program. Also on the ferry is a young man who says he can’t stand the school that Asumi goes to. However, what really gets to Asumi is the fact that this young man bears a resemblance to a boy she knew in middle school who died from cancer. Later in the volume, she sees this young man at the planetarium, and she is surprised to see him there after how he treated her on the ferry.

The story about Asumi’s friend with cancer was shown in “Asumi’s Cherry Blossoms,” a short piece that appeared at the end of Volume Three. When I read “Asumi’s Cherry Blossoms,” I figured there would be some importance in the series; however, I didn’t expect just how much that short story would be referenced in Volume Four. I’m glad that short story was included in Volume Three, because as a reader, I could understand the importance of this plot point in Volume Four.

There are also hints dropped that there’s even more to the character of Marika than what appears on the surface. It will be interesting to see where Marika’s story heads in future volumes of Twin Spica.

There are three short stories included at the end of Volume Four: “This Star Spica,” “Sentimental,” and “Another Spica.”

“This Star Spica” is about when Asumi and Fuchuya back when they were in elementary school. Their teacher asks Fuchuya to spend some time with Asumi, because the teacher is concerned that Asumi hasn’t had any friends since she entered the fourth grade. This brief story shows what happens during Fuchuya’s attempt.

“Sentimental” shows a young man named Kamoi running into his old love, Kasumi Tsushima on the train. They do some reminiscing, and the story ends with Kasumi telling him that she’s about to get married. While this is a sweet little story that makes some vague references to things seen in Twin Spica, I really didn’t understand how this fit into the story.

“Another Spica” is yet another attempt by Kou Yaginuma to insert himself into the world of Twin Spica. Just like the previous “Another Spica” stories, they are my least favorite part of the Twin Spica volumes.

As I read the Twin Spica series, I’m impressed by how Yaginuma has introduced new threads and ideas to the story. Not only do these new threads and ideas enhance the character of Asumi, but they also make it so the reader wants to continue reading the series to find out where the story will go to next.

Twin Spica is a very well done manga series. I would highly recommend it to people who already read manga, as well as to non-manga readers who would enjoy the type of storytelling that the series uses.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Twin Spica Volume Four that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Twin Spica: