English Cast for Tokyo ESP

FUNimation Entertainment has announced the English cast for Tokyo ESP:

  • Sarah Wiedenheft is Rinka
  • Adam Dahlberg is Kyotaro
  • Mallorie Rodak is Minami
  • Bryan Massey is Rindou
  • Jenny Ledel is Kuroi
  • Lara Woodhull is Murasaki
  • Heather Walker is Peggy
  • Morgan Berry is Ayumu
  • R Bruce Elliott is Yodani
  • Jefferey Schmidt is Professor
  • Lindsay Seidel is Kozuki
  • Bryn Apprill is Amie
  • Trina Nishimura is Rin
  • Philip Weber is Sukesaburo
  • Ray Hurd is Kakunoshin

FUNimation will release Tokyo ESP on February 23, 2016 in both a limited edition and a regular edition Blu-ray Disc/DVD set.

Source: ANN

2014 In Review: Summer 2014 Season

I’ve posted about the series I watched in the Winter 2014 season and about the series I started watching during the Spring 2014 season. Today, I’m posting about the anime series I started watching during the Summer 2014 season.

Sailor Moon Crystal: So far, this series seems to be following the manga much more closely than the original anime series did. I’ve only seen a portion of the original Sailor Moon anime, but from what I’ve seen of both that and Sailor Moon Crystal, I think that the storytelling and feel of Sailor Moon Crystal is stronger. The animation in Sailor Moon Crystal was very rough for a while, but the quality seems to have improved with more recent episodes. The main weakness that Sailor Moon Crystal has is the fact that it only airs twice a month; because of that, momentum is lost between episodes. Hopefully once the series becomes available on home video in the future and viewers can see episodes much closer together, that the storytelling will feel stronger than it does now. This is a series that will be continuing into the Winter 2015 season, so expect to see it appear in a retrospective for 2015!

Free! Eternal Summer: This is the second season for Free! – Iwatobi Swim Club, a series that aired during the Summer 2013 season. When I watched the first episode of Free! Eternal Summer, I saw much more blatant “fanservice” included in it than I had in all of the previous season of Free! I found myself fearing that Free! Eternal Summer was going to try to focus more on the fanservice than on the story. Fortunately, the fanservice was toned down tremendously after Episode One and that there was more of an emphasis placed on the story. Not only did Episode Two tone down the fanservice, it also did a great job of setting up the new elements that were being introduced to the series. With Episode Five, I was very happy to see Nagisa get a character development episode. While most of the other characters had received character development episodes in the first season, Nagisa was the only one who hadn’t. After watching Episode Five, I felt I understood where Nagisa was coming from a lot better than I had previously. With how the prefecturals progressed in Episode Six, it allowed Free! Eternal Summer to differentiate itself from the first season, since there would be a story that focuses on the Iwatobi team going to nationals. I also appreciated seeing the way that Free! Eternal Summer came to an end, which is with a montage that shows what happens to the various characters during the next school year. But from seeing this montage, it leads me to believe that there more than likely won’t be another season of the Free! anime. While I do enjoy this series quite a bit, I really can’t see where they could take the story, especially with Makoto and Haruka no longer being on the school’s swim team. It just wouldn’t be the same without all four of them.

Aldnoah.Zero: After watching the first episode, I thought that Aldnoah.Zero showed a lot of promise; however, I did have some issues with how much “info dumping” took place. During the first couple of episodes, I found myself being able to predict some of the events that happened; however, this ability to predict what would happen in the story went out the window as the series progressed. The info dumping came back in Episode Six; at this point, I found myself wondering if maybe the series needed more episodes, because the info dumping felt as if it was being done to help the story move along faster in order for it to fit into the allotted number of episodes for the series. At the end of Episode Seven, I thought the storytelling had become even more of a mess than what I’d seen during Episode Six. At the end of Episode Eight, I thought that the writing had gotten sloppy, there was a relative lack of character development, and that there were radical changes in characterization. It almost felt as if someone was making up the story as they went, and that was the only way I could explain how the storytelling had fallen apart as much as it did over the course of eight episodes. Unfortunately, the quality of the writing never improved over the remaining four episodes of the series. After reaching the end of the series, I found myself thinking that I’d wasted 12 weeks of my time watching it.

Re: Hamatora: This is the second season of Hamatora that I’d been looking forward to watching after watching the cliffhanger at the end of the Winter 2014 season. After watching the first episode, I felt that even though there was a more serious tone than there had been to the first season of Hamatora, the second season seemed to be a strong continuation for the series. I pretty much felt this way through Episode Five. With Episode Six, though, the series started to become much more weird and dark than it had been. At that point, I had hoped that perhaps this would be the weirdest that the series would get. Unfortunately, the episodes continued becoming stranger and stranger for the remainder of the series. In the end, I didn’t enjoy Re: Hamatora as much as I did the first season of Hamatora. Right at first, the darker and more serious tone of Re: Hamatora was a refreshing change of pace; however, as the season wore on, the storyline in Re: Hamatora just continued to become stranger and stranger. Ultimately, the two seasons of Hamatora were as different as night and day: the first season was more light-hearted with the occasional serious moment, while the second season was more serious with the occasional light-hearted moment early on. But by the end of Re: Hamatora, any light-heartedness was basically gone. In the end, Re: Hamatora did present some interesting concepts, but I’m not convinced that the execution of those concepts worked as well as they could have.

Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun: After watching the first episode of the series, I thought it was off to a good start. I liked the main characters and how they interacted with each other. The story also kept my interest, and the humor was very enjoyable. Episode Two did a good job of building off of Episode One, and the story continued to be amusing. That episode introduced Yuzuki, who ended up being the only character who never truly grew on me; I found her to be rather annoying. I have to admit that my interest started to wane a little with Episode Five, because the humor in that episode wasn’t quite as amusing as it had been in the previous four episodes. This slump in the humor lasted for two episodes, then started getting better for a couple of episodes, and then there was another minor slump in Episode Nine. Fortunately, the final three episodes of the series help to make up for the slump in the humor that appeared around halfway through the series. But even with the episodes that weren’t as amusing as the rest of the series, the stories presented in those episodes weren’t bad. My main gripe, though, is that there seemed to be too many characters, so some characters couldn’t get the development and screen time that they needed. The characters who really felt as if they didn’t need to be there are Nozaki’s tanuki-loving former editor, and his upstairs neighbor who’s also a shojo manga artist. In the long run, those two particular characters really didn’t add a whole lot to the series and didn’t contribute much to the overall story. Even though there was no real conclusion to the story, I think the series needed to end the way that it did. This is due in large part to the fact that the manga is still ongoing in Japan; also, if any of these potential couples did officially get together by the end, it would have had a strong effect on the series’ humor. Overall, Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun was an enjoyable viewing experience from start to end. In fact, I would have to say that this would be one of my overall favorite series that I watched during the Summer 2014 anime season. I’d even be willing to go so far as to say that would rank up there among my favorite series that I watched during 2014.

Blue Spring Ride: After watching the first episode, I thought that Blue Spring Ride was off to a promising start. I liked the various character interactions, and the episode did a good job of establishing the characters and the story. And after watching Episode Two, I thought it was even better than Episode One had been. By the time I finished Episode Six, I thought that there were a lot of ways in which the plot twists and turns in Blue Spring Ride remind me a lot of what I saw in Strobe Edge, another manga by Io Sakisaka. Since I enjoyed the twists and turns in Strobe Edge, I also enjoyed them in Blue Spring Ride. After I finished watching Blue Spring Ride, I thought that it was a well-done shojo anime series. The series had characters that I became interested and invested in, and the romantic and friendship storylines were done in a way where they really didn’t come across as “over the top.” Blue Spring Ride is a series that I’d happily watch again at some point in the future. It’s another title that would rank up there among my favorite anime from 2014.

HaNaYaMaTa: After watching the first episode, I found myself thinking that the animation was very bright and colorful. Also, all the female characters seemed to have a rather “cute” look to them, which gave the series a moe feel. Storywise, I thought HaNaYaMaTa was off to a decent start and appeared to have the foundation for an interesting story. At the time, I hoped that the series could continue in the style I saw in the first episode and not devolve into yet another “cute girls doing cute things” show. By the end of Episode Three, I had to give HaNaYaMaTa some credit for the fact that while it had a “moe” look and feel to it, the girls came across as actual characters and not as girls that fit various character types. There was also an overarching story that helped to keep a viewer interested, unlike many of the more recent moe type shows that seemed to focus more on vignettes and simply being cute rather than having much in the way of substance to its story. At the end of Episode Six, I was impressed by how the series’ plot kept the story moving and how the portrayal of the characters endeared them to the audience since they were actually characters and not simply character types. I appreciated HaNaYaMaTa for proving to me that a show with cute girls can actually have substance to it and be enjoyable to watch week after week. Unfortunately, I wasn’t as satisfied by the ending of HaNaYaMaTa as I hoped I would be. A major event happens at the end of Episode 11 that really affects the Yosakoi Club, but Episode 12 brings a resolution to that roadblock in such a way that I had a hard time using my “willing suspension of belief” or finding any way to the ending to be anywhere near realistic. Also, I thought there was a major loose end that was left resolved at the end of Episode 12. Overall, I did enjoy HaNaYaMaTa, even if I was a little disappointed in how the expected resolution with Hana ultimately transpired.

Love Stage!!: After watching the first episode, I saw that Love Stage!! was leaning more toward the comedic side; from what I saw, the comedy seemed to work for the story being told. I also thought that the series showed a lot of promise. Episode Three, however, made me a little uncomfortable when Ichijo tried to force Izumi to strip down and then became rather romantic toward him when he saw Izumi’s face. I wasn’t bothered by the fact that this scene featured two guys; in fact, it would have bothered me just as much if this scene had taken place between Ichijo and a female character. Honestly, if Shogo hadn’t come at just the right moment, Ichijo could have potentially raped Izumi. And that would not have been cool at all. But it still wasn’t cool how far Ichijo had managed to get before Shogo’s interference. By the end of Episode Four, it was very blatant that the series was heading into boys-love territory; as I watched the remainder of the series, I thought that the boys-love aspect was handled rather well. The series ended pretty much as I expected it to, with Izumi and Ichijo becoming a couple. With the way this episode ended, it could work as an ending for the series, but if there’s more content in the manga that hasn’t been covered, there could always be the potential for a second season if the first season performed well enough. As of this writing, there’s only been an OVA that’s been released in Japan in addition to the television anime series. Overall, I thought Love Stage!! was an ok series, but it’s not something I’d personally rush to see again anytime soon. I’m not saying that because it’s a boys-love title, because if this had been a series with a straight couple that was done in this manner, I’d feel the same way.

Terror in Resonance: After I watched the first episode, I thought the animation looked good, and that Yoko Kanno was delivering another good anime score. Story-wise, I thought the series was off to a promising start, even if it was a little slow to get going. Once the story started to become more established over the course of the episode, it intrigued me enough to keep my interest. By the end of Episode Five, it felt like the story had been kicked up a notch, due to the introduction of Five and the potential issues that Shibazaki faced in this episode. But at this point, I found myself not feeling terribly sure about Lisa as a character, because she just didn’t seem to have much of a purpose; she was starting to feel more like a prop than anything else. At the end of Episode Six, I found myself wondering if should truly be rooting for anyone. Nine and Twelve were the main characters, but I wasn’t sure I could root for them with everything they’d done up to that point. Five may have been affiliated with the authorities, but she was only looking out for her own interests, so I couldn’t root for her. Lisa still hadn’t done much of anything at that point, and the closest character there was to a “good guy” was Shibazaki. At the end of Episode 10, I was still rather frustrated with Lisa as a character. At this point, she’d either been a prop or becomes the “damsel in distress.” Also, I was also feeling frustrated by the overall lack of character development for both Nine and Twelve, who are supposed to be the main characters of the series. After finishing the series, I came to see how the series only touched on its themes and the majority of its characters on a purely surface level. The only character to truly have any character development was Shibazaki. Lisa seemed to have the least development; all we seem to know about her is the fact that she was being bullied and had an extremely clingy mother. Episode 12 made an attempt at trying to make Lisa a more important character in the series, but at that point, it was simply too little, too late. Two of the characters were killed at the end of the episode; however, since they were really only known to the audience on a surface level, it was hard to feel any kind of emotion when they died. Terror in Resonance is a story that had so much promise, but in the end, it didn’t deliver as I’d hoped. It’s got good animation, great music, and an interesting premise; unfortunately, the series was ultimately lacking in its overall execution. It reminds me a lot of cotton candy: it looks good, tastes great, but in the end it still leaves you feeling empty.

Tokyo ESP: After watching the first episode of Tokyo ESP, I thought that the animation was rather well-done. I also thought that there seemed to be an interesting idea being presented, but that the pacing felt a little on the sluggish side. I also found myself feeling rather confused, because the episode was done in such a way that it felt like it was being assumed that the audience already knew and understood what was taking place. With Episode Two, it became clear that the trick of starting at one point in the story and then backtracking to fill in the gaps to get back to where the story started was being utilized. After watching Episode Two, I did have a better impression of Tokyo ESP. But as the series continued, I found myself thinking that it probably would have made the series stronger if the second episode had been the first episode and had just gone in chronological order. By eliminating that first episode, the writers would have gained one episode that could have potentially allowed them to develop the characters or the story a little more. When the final episode concluded, it didn’t feel like the story had come to an end; in fact, it felt as if the stage was being set for a second season. However, there was nothing at the end of the episode to announce that another season would be coming in the future. After finishing Tokyo ESP, I found that I never was able to enjoy it as much as I’d hoped I would. The way the series started didn’t really help anything, since it left me so confused as to what was going on. When the actual story got going in Episode Two, the pacing of the story tended to feel slow, although not quite as slow as the first episode; but the pacing never really improved much after Episode Two. I also found that I just couldn’t get into the characters, not even into the characters who had some clearly defined development, such as Rinka and Kyotaro. Looking back, I realize I had this underlying sense of detachment from the characters. In the end, Tokyo ESP had an interesting concept behind it, but the execution just wasn’t as strong as it could have been.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

Anime Spotlight: Tokyo ESP

Tokyo ESP is an anime based on a manga series by Hajime Segawa. The anime is produced by Xebec, and is directed by Shigehito Takayanagi. The series aired on Japanese television from July 11-September 26, 2014.

As of this writing, FUNimation Entertainment holds the North American streaming license for Tokyo ESP.

One day, a girl named Rinka sees a flying penguin and has an encounter with glowing fish that are swimming in the air, she discovers that she has become an esper. When her ability activates, her hair turns white, and she is able to pass through objects. She meets a young man named Kyotaro Azuma, who also had an encounter with the glowing fish; he has become an esper with the ability to teleport.

Rinka discovers that her father, who had been out drinking the night before, has also acquired an esper ability; he becomes highly magnetized and attracts things to him. Unfortunately he doesn’t realize that he has this ability, so it causes utter chaos when he tries to find Rinka and attracts everything in sight to him. It’s up to Rinka to save him.

When Rinka goes to work the next day, she finds Azuma there. As she’s talking with him, her esper ability kicks in; but before her boss notices, the police come in and ask the owner about a suspect in a rash of cases of stolen jewelry. The thief is able to disappear like a wisp of fog; after Rinka hears this, she suspects Azuma. He teleports away before she can say anything.

Since there’s a museum right next to where Rinka works, she uses her ability to enter the museum without being noticed. She finds that someone has already struck, and she learns that the culprit is a girl named Kobushi who is an esper with the power of invisibility.

As the series progresses, Rinka meets Murasaki Edoyama (an esper with the ability of psychometry) and Ayumu Oozora (an esper with the power of precognition). They work together to take on a man known as The Professor and his daughter, Minami, who both possess esper powers, as well as the espers they have gathered together to fight for their cause. During the series, we learn that Kyotaro has a connection with the Professor and Minami, and that this connection causes issues for Kyotaro.

After watching the first episode of Tokyo ESP, I thought that the animation was rather well-done. I also thought that there seemed to be an interesting idea being presented, the pacing felt a little on the sluggish side. I also found myself feeling rather confused, because the episode was done in such a way that it felt like it was being assumed that the audience already knew and understood what was taking place.

With Episode Two, it became clear that the trick of starting at one point in the story and then backtracking to fill in the gaps to get back to where the story started was being utilized. After watching Episode Two, I did have a better impression of Tokyo ESP. But as the series continued, I found myself thinking that it probably would have made the series stronger if the second episode had been the first episode and had just gone in chronological order. By eliminating that first episode, the writers would have gained one episode that could have potentially allowed them to develop the characters or the story a little more.

When the final episode concluded, it didn’t feel like the story had come to an end; in fact, it felt as if the stage was being set for a second season. However, there was nothing at the end of the episode to announce that another season would be coming in the future.

Now that I’ve finished Tokyo ESP, I found that I never was able to enjoy it as much as I’d hoped I would. The way the series started didn’t really help anything, since it left me so confused as to what was going on. When the actual story got going in Episode Two, the pacing of the story tended to feel slow, although not quite as slow as the first episode; but the pacing never really improved much after Episode Two. I also found that I just couldn’t get into the characters, not even into the characters who had some clearly defined development, such as Rinka and Kyotaro. Looking back, I realize I had this underlying sense of detachment from the characters.

In the end, Tokyo ESP had an interesting concept behind it, but the execution just wasn’t as strong as it could have been. At this point, if there’s ever another season of the series, I probably wouldn’t be in a rush to watch it.

Additional Anime Spotlights:

Tokyo ESP: Episode 12 – “Tokyo ESP Girl”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

Episode 12 features a lot of action. Early on, the action focuses on a fight between Rinka and Minami; while Rinka hasn’t regained her esper power, she’s still able to hold her own against Minami.

Roshi and the other espers who have come with Rinka find themselves up against the esper that’s causing the parliament building to float in the air. Things seem hopeless until Peggy, Ayumu, Murasaki, and Kobushi. We get to see how Kobushi’s training has helped he improve her ability, and she’s able to knock the esper out. And when the parliament building starts falling, Rinka’s father is able to save the day. And it was very touching here when Ayumu is reunited with his mother and she apologizes for how she’s acted toward him.

The majority of the episode focuses on a confrontation that includes Rinka, Minami, and The Professor. As all hope seems lost, Kyotaro appears with the telepathic bird, and things start happening. Minami’s jealousy of Rinka’s closeness to Kyotaro rears its ugly head, especially after the Professor orders her to kill Kyotaro. But after Kyotaro explains his feelings and what he went through, Minami has a change of heart.

But then something unexpected happens. Another esper that I don’t recall ever seeing before appears and stabs the Professor. We never get an explanation as to who this person is, so that was rather frustrating.

And at the end of the episode, it turns out the heroes didn’t succeed in stopping the change. It’s now seven days after the confrontation, and the city has fallen into chaos. Crimes are being committed everywhere, and esper cases are on the rise.

In a lot of respects, it didn’t feel like the story had come to an end; in fact, it felt as if the stage was being set for a second season. However, there was nothing at the end of the episode to announce that another season would be coming in the future.

Now that I’ve finished Tokyo ESP, I found that I never was able to enjoy it as much as I’d hoped I would. The way the series started didn’t really help anything, since it left me so confused as to what was going on. When the actual story got going in Episode Two, the pacing of the story tended to feel rather slow, and that pacing never really improved by the end. Also, it was a little frustrating to have Kyotaro kidnapped not once, but twice, by Minami. This made that particular plot point feel repetitive. I also found that I just couldn’t get into the characters, not even into the characters who had some clearly defined development, such as Rinka and Kyotaro. Looking back, I realize I had this underlying sense of detachment from the characters.

In the end, Tokyo ESP had an interesting concept behind it, but the execution just wasn’t as strong as it could have been. At this point, if there’s ever another season of the series, I probably wouldn’t be in a rush to watch it.

Additional posts about Tokyo ESP:

Tokyo ESP: Episode 11 – “Tokyo Girls War”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

Episode 11 finally sees the story returning to where it had been at the beginning of Episode One. While we see a little bit of what we saw in Episode One, Episode 11 is trying to show other events that were taking place that would lead the characters to where we saw them at the end of Episode One.

The Professor and his espers launch an attack on the parliament building and commit terrorist attacks across the city. Rinka, who is imprisoned in the Esper Detainment Center, is trying to figure out what she can do, especially since she lost her power. But when a couple of the Professor’s espers break into the detainment center to free the espers and woo them to their side, Rinka is able to rely on her own fighting ability to take these espers down.

As Rinka finds help from her father and some of the other espers to try to free the hostages in the parliament building, Ayumu, Murasaki, and Kobushi are able to rescue Peggy from his captors. The three of them also decide to head to the parliament building in order to help out.

And then there’s Kyotaro, who’s still stranded on the island and can’t teleport out. He builds a raft and gathers up supplies; but before he can leave, he is approached by a large bird that has the ability to read people’s minds. As expected, this bird managed to get this power from the glowing fish. The bird starts to lead Kyotaro across the water back to where Rinka and the others are.

Okay, I just have to say that this portion with the bird was a little on the weird side. To me, this kind of felt like the writer realized they needed to find a way to get Kyotaro back into the action but couldn’t come up with a more plausible way for this to happen. The bird says it’s possible for animals to acquire strange powers, but how come this is the first time we ever saw this in the series? And that it just so happened that this bird is a migratory bird that happened to get a glowing fish and then just happened to come to the island that Kyotaro is trapped on.

The episode ends with Minami launching into a fight with Rinka, so I’m expecting an epic fight between the two of them in Episode 12.

Seeing how the series has played out to the point of circling back around to the first episode, I still believe that this series would have been stronger from the start if the second episode was the first episode of the series. Not only would it have been less confusing for the audience, it would have given the writers one more episode to develop this story and the characters a little more.

I just hope that Tokyo ESP will have a satisfactory ending.

Additional posts about Tokyo ESP:

Tokyo ESP: Episode 10 – “In Bitter Lament…”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

The main focus of Episode 10 is on Kyotaro learning how his parents and Minami’s mother really died. It’s also during this exposition that we learn where the glowing fish came from. Basically, both of their parents were part of the same archaeological expedition that found the Ark of the Covenant. A general of the country they’re in takes out a stone tablet and accidentally breaks it; the glowing fish are released when this happens.

Both of Minami’s parents and Kyotaro’s mother acquire powers from the fish, and the general that broke the tablet wants to have powers like this as well. A diplomat from Japan is brought in to deal with the situation, but it turns out he’s made an agreement with the general. After the group of archaeologists is ambushed by the general and his men, they all die except for Minami’s father.

Not only did this finally give us some backstory for Minami, Kyotaro, and the Professor, it also provides a clear motivation for what the Professor has been doing since the beginning of the series. And after Kyotaro learns the truth, he finds himself struggling to decide whether he wants to continue down the path he’s been going or to seek revenge for his parents’ deaths. For viewers who have been following this series, they should be able to figure out what decision he comes to and how he comes to that decision.

We see Rinka early on in the episode, and she’s lost and broken. She questions the fighting she’s done up to this point, and believes that she ultimately did nothing to protect other peopke. Rinka is caught by the Esper Detainment Force. She’s taken to the Esper Detainment Center, where she’s given a barcode on her arm and has a transmitter with a wireless tap embedded into her. She has a reunion with Roshi and learns what’s happened to her father.

Episode 10 had a strong focus on exposition and providing information that finally helps to make everything we’ve seen up to this point fall into place. I suspect it’s also the “calm before the storm” episode to allow the audience to catch its breath before pushing through whatever action will be taking place over the final two episodes of the series.

But my big question is: How is Rinka going to get her esper power back? At this point, her power is gone and she can’t really do anything to help with the esper situation without it. I’d guess that somehow a fish returns to her, but I don’t know how that would happen yet. Also, I suspect that Kyotaro will play an important role in the finale, but I’m not sure how he’s going to return to where Rinka and the others are, since his teleportation power isn’t getting him back there. It’ll be interesting to see how these two big issues are resolved so we can hopefully have the ending for this series that will be satisfactory to the audience.

Additional posts about Tokyo ESP:

Tokyo ESP: Episode 9 – “Attack, ESP Girls”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

Early on in Episode Nine, we get to learn a little more about Minami through a couple of flashbacks; one of them shows what happened after the death of Minami’s mother, while the other showed the time that she acquired her teleportation power. These flashbacks provide insight into how Minami has become the person that we’ve seen in the series.

Minami and the espers who have joined with her father attack the high school that Rinka and Kyotaro attend. During the chaos, Rinka is forced to activate her power and reveal to her friends that she’s the White Girl. Unfortunately, one of Minami’s espers has an ability to hypnotize people if they make eye contact with her, and the hypnotized include Kyotaro and Rinka’s friends. Rinka gets beaten up pretty badly, and is choked to the point where it appears she’s died; the glowing fish inside of her also comes out at the same time. Kyotaro snaps out of the hypnotism, but Minami is able to teleport him away to an island before he can do anything; unfortunately, Kyotaro is unable to teleport back.

Because of the attack on the high school, the “ESP Restriction Law” goes into effect and the special “Esper Detainment Force” has been mobilized to round up all the espers. They barge in on Rinka’s hospital room right after she discovers she’s lost her ability, and insists that she come into their custody. Rinka manages to escape with the help of her father and Roshi, but they’re both injured in the process.

Right at the end of the episode, Rinka believes she’s unable to help anyone and takes off on her own. Hopefully Rinka can figure out what to do, because without her power there’s not much that she can do. And if Minami or her group find her, Rinka could be in some major trouble.

And I knew it was too good to be true for Kyotaro to have returned like he did at the end of Episode Eight. If you read my write-up for Episode Eight, I had predicted that something would make their reunion short-lived, and I’m sad to see that I was right.

There’s only three episodes remaining for Tokyo ESP, and I hope this series is able to end on a satisfactory note. At this point there still seem to be several loose ends hanging out there, and I hope the writers don’t end up having to rush the story in order to bring all these loose ends together during the climax and conclusion. There’s a promising story here, and I hope it doesn’t fall apart right at the end.

Additional posts about Tokyo ESP:

Tokyo ESP: Episode 8 – “Fruition, Girls Set into Motion”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

In Episode Eight, we see that Ayumu’s mother is having trouble dealing with the fact that her son is an esper. When we see the two of them talking together, she is obviously drunk, and she’s much more concerned about how this will affect her career than in how becoming an esper is affecting her child. Ayumu ends up spending the remainder of the episode in his room; near the end, he gets a surprise visit from Peggy, who brings him a gift from Murasaki. She claims to be doing this as thanks for what he did in Episode Seven, but I wonder if she might actually have some feelings for him.

Ayumu hasn’t officially joined up with Rinka and the others at this point, but I suspect that he soon will be. I think that will end up happening if something happens to his mother, such as her throwing Ayumu out of the house or her being killed or something.

A lot of the episode focuses on Minami trying to recruit espers to join her father’s cause. In order to join, one must show the power of their ESP by murdering someone. Rinka ends up getting mixed up in this when a potential recruit targets her. Let’s just say it doesn’t go as well as the recruit thought it would.

Speaking of Rinka, she spends a bit of time in the episode reminiscing about Kyotaro and missing him. Kyotaro makes another attempt to escape by using Minami’s ability, but he’s the one who ends up surprised when Minami tells him he can go. Rinka and Kyotaro are reunited when school starts back up again, but there’s a foreshadowing that Minami and her troops are going to attack the school.

While I was happy to see that Kyotaro was released, I have a suspicion that something isn’t quite right. It just seems that Kyotaro was able to get his freedom a little too easily. Will there turn out to be some strings attached to his release that the audience doesn’t know about? Or will something happen when Minami attacks the school that will cut Rinka and Kyotaro’s reunion short?

With the way Episode Eight ends, there’s several different ways that this story can go. I’m looking forward to seeing Episode Nine in order to find out exactly how Tokyo ESP will continue.

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Tokyo ESP: Episode 7 – “Girls in the Rain”

Tokyo ESP sees a group of espers trying to take over Tokyo. There’s a group known as The White Girl, which consists of espers that fight for justice and try to stop the espers who are attacking Tokyo. The most prominent member of The White Girl is a girl named Rinka.

During Episode Seven, Rinka discovers that Ayumu has an esper ability as she attempts to spar with him and she keeps missing. She’s able to figure out that he has a precognitive ability, but that it only allows him to only see a little bit into the future. So Rinka has to spend time training some more and trying to come up with a way to overcome his ability when she fights him.

Was it just me, or was Ayumu on the annoying side at the beginning of the episode? I know he’s a middle school student, but he had a rather poor attitude when it comes to women. But after seeing his mother later in the episode, his attitude is at least somewhat understandable. His mother is a politician who hates espers and believes they need to be captured and researched. His mother comes across as being distant from Ayumu and focused more on her career, so it’s really no wonder he feels the way he does. On top of that, he’s having to hide the fact that he’s an esper from her, so I’m sure that only compounds his issues.

Murasaki also discovers that her esper power doesn’t activate unless she’s touching something. She experiments by using a weapon and discovers this gives her an interesting ability. We get to see this ability in action a couple of times; unfortunately for Murasaki, it’s got some unintended side effects, so it doesn’t appear to be something she can use a lot.

The episode climaxes when an esper attacks a rally that Ayumu’s mother is holding as part of her campaign. It’s up to Ayumu and Murasaki to try to save the day…

This episode only gives us a brief glimpse at what’s going on with Kyotaro; however, this brief glimpse does provide a flashback with a little more background information for Kyotaro and Minami. Hopefully we’ll be able to see more of Kyotaro in the remaining episodes of the series.

At this point, it appears that we’ve finally assembled all of the major players of the series. Because of this, I’m really hoping to finally return to what was taking place back in Episode One. I’m beginning to wonder if what we saw in Episode One is going to end up being the final battle between the two groups of espers and that we’ll be able to see how it all ends before the series concludes.

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