Main English Cast for Terror in Resonance

FUNimation Entertainment has announced the main English cast for the Terror in Resonance anime:

  • Christopher Bevins is Nine
  • Aaron Dismuke is Twelve
  • Jad Saxton is Lisa
  • Robert McCollum is Shibazaki
  • Jamie Marchi is Five

Christopher Bevins is directing.

FUNimation will release the series on a Blu-ray/DVD combo pack on January 19, 2016. The series will be available in a regular edition (MSRP US$64.98) and limited edition (MSRP US$84.98).

Source: ANN

FUNimation Acquires Home Video Rights for Eight Anime Series

FUNimation Entertainment has announced that the company has acquired the home video rights for eight anime series that they had previously simulcast:

  • Noragami: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in Summer 2015.
  • Danganronpa: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in 2015.
  • Buddy Complex: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD; however, the release date is still to be determined.
  • Nobunagun: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD on March 31, 2015.
  • Daimidaler: Prince VS. Penguin Empire: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in 2015.
  • Terror in Resonance: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in Fall 2015.
  • Maken-Ki! Two: The series will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in Spring 2015.
  • selector infected WIXOSS / selector spread WIXOSS: selector infected WIXOSS will be released on Blu-ray and DVD in 2015. A release date for selector spread WIXOSS is currently to be announced.

Source: The Fandom Post

2014 In Review: Summer 2014 Season

I’ve posted about the series I watched in the Winter 2014 season and about the series I started watching during the Spring 2014 season. Today, I’m posting about the anime series I started watching during the Summer 2014 season.

Sailor Moon Crystal: So far, this series seems to be following the manga much more closely than the original anime series did. I’ve only seen a portion of the original Sailor Moon anime, but from what I’ve seen of both that and Sailor Moon Crystal, I think that the storytelling and feel of Sailor Moon Crystal is stronger. The animation in Sailor Moon Crystal was very rough for a while, but the quality seems to have improved with more recent episodes. The main weakness that Sailor Moon Crystal has is the fact that it only airs twice a month; because of that, momentum is lost between episodes. Hopefully once the series becomes available on home video in the future and viewers can see episodes much closer together, that the storytelling will feel stronger than it does now. This is a series that will be continuing into the Winter 2015 season, so expect to see it appear in a retrospective for 2015!

Free! Eternal Summer: This is the second season for Free! – Iwatobi Swim Club, a series that aired during the Summer 2013 season. When I watched the first episode of Free! Eternal Summer, I saw much more blatant “fanservice” included in it than I had in all of the previous season of Free! I found myself fearing that Free! Eternal Summer was going to try to focus more on the fanservice than on the story. Fortunately, the fanservice was toned down tremendously after Episode One and that there was more of an emphasis placed on the story. Not only did Episode Two tone down the fanservice, it also did a great job of setting up the new elements that were being introduced to the series. With Episode Five, I was very happy to see Nagisa get a character development episode. While most of the other characters had received character development episodes in the first season, Nagisa was the only one who hadn’t. After watching Episode Five, I felt I understood where Nagisa was coming from a lot better than I had previously. With how the prefecturals progressed in Episode Six, it allowed Free! Eternal Summer to differentiate itself from the first season, since there would be a story that focuses on the Iwatobi team going to nationals. I also appreciated seeing the way that Free! Eternal Summer came to an end, which is with a montage that shows what happens to the various characters during the next school year. But from seeing this montage, it leads me to believe that there more than likely won’t be another season of the Free! anime. While I do enjoy this series quite a bit, I really can’t see where they could take the story, especially with Makoto and Haruka no longer being on the school’s swim team. It just wouldn’t be the same without all four of them.

Aldnoah.Zero: After watching the first episode, I thought that Aldnoah.Zero showed a lot of promise; however, I did have some issues with how much “info dumping” took place. During the first couple of episodes, I found myself being able to predict some of the events that happened; however, this ability to predict what would happen in the story went out the window as the series progressed. The info dumping came back in Episode Six; at this point, I found myself wondering if maybe the series needed more episodes, because the info dumping felt as if it was being done to help the story move along faster in order for it to fit into the allotted number of episodes for the series. At the end of Episode Seven, I thought the storytelling had become even more of a mess than what I’d seen during Episode Six. At the end of Episode Eight, I thought that the writing had gotten sloppy, there was a relative lack of character development, and that there were radical changes in characterization. It almost felt as if someone was making up the story as they went, and that was the only way I could explain how the storytelling had fallen apart as much as it did over the course of eight episodes. Unfortunately, the quality of the writing never improved over the remaining four episodes of the series. After reaching the end of the series, I found myself thinking that I’d wasted 12 weeks of my time watching it.

Re: Hamatora: This is the second season of Hamatora that I’d been looking forward to watching after watching the cliffhanger at the end of the Winter 2014 season. After watching the first episode, I felt that even though there was a more serious tone than there had been to the first season of Hamatora, the second season seemed to be a strong continuation for the series. I pretty much felt this way through Episode Five. With Episode Six, though, the series started to become much more weird and dark than it had been. At that point, I had hoped that perhaps this would be the weirdest that the series would get. Unfortunately, the episodes continued becoming stranger and stranger for the remainder of the series. In the end, I didn’t enjoy Re: Hamatora as much as I did the first season of Hamatora. Right at first, the darker and more serious tone of Re: Hamatora was a refreshing change of pace; however, as the season wore on, the storyline in Re: Hamatora just continued to become stranger and stranger. Ultimately, the two seasons of Hamatora were as different as night and day: the first season was more light-hearted with the occasional serious moment, while the second season was more serious with the occasional light-hearted moment early on. But by the end of Re: Hamatora, any light-heartedness was basically gone. In the end, Re: Hamatora did present some interesting concepts, but I’m not convinced that the execution of those concepts worked as well as they could have.

Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun: After watching the first episode of the series, I thought it was off to a good start. I liked the main characters and how they interacted with each other. The story also kept my interest, and the humor was very enjoyable. Episode Two did a good job of building off of Episode One, and the story continued to be amusing. That episode introduced Yuzuki, who ended up being the only character who never truly grew on me; I found her to be rather annoying. I have to admit that my interest started to wane a little with Episode Five, because the humor in that episode wasn’t quite as amusing as it had been in the previous four episodes. This slump in the humor lasted for two episodes, then started getting better for a couple of episodes, and then there was another minor slump in Episode Nine. Fortunately, the final three episodes of the series help to make up for the slump in the humor that appeared around halfway through the series. But even with the episodes that weren’t as amusing as the rest of the series, the stories presented in those episodes weren’t bad. My main gripe, though, is that there seemed to be too many characters, so some characters couldn’t get the development and screen time that they needed. The characters who really felt as if they didn’t need to be there are Nozaki’s tanuki-loving former editor, and his upstairs neighbor who’s also a shojo manga artist. In the long run, those two particular characters really didn’t add a whole lot to the series and didn’t contribute much to the overall story. Even though there was no real conclusion to the story, I think the series needed to end the way that it did. This is due in large part to the fact that the manga is still ongoing in Japan; also, if any of these potential couples did officially get together by the end, it would have had a strong effect on the series’ humor. Overall, Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun was an enjoyable viewing experience from start to end. In fact, I would have to say that this would be one of my overall favorite series that I watched during the Summer 2014 anime season. I’d even be willing to go so far as to say that would rank up there among my favorite series that I watched during 2014.

Blue Spring Ride: After watching the first episode, I thought that Blue Spring Ride was off to a promising start. I liked the various character interactions, and the episode did a good job of establishing the characters and the story. And after watching Episode Two, I thought it was even better than Episode One had been. By the time I finished Episode Six, I thought that there were a lot of ways in which the plot twists and turns in Blue Spring Ride remind me a lot of what I saw in Strobe Edge, another manga by Io Sakisaka. Since I enjoyed the twists and turns in Strobe Edge, I also enjoyed them in Blue Spring Ride. After I finished watching Blue Spring Ride, I thought that it was a well-done shojo anime series. The series had characters that I became interested and invested in, and the romantic and friendship storylines were done in a way where they really didn’t come across as “over the top.” Blue Spring Ride is a series that I’d happily watch again at some point in the future. It’s another title that would rank up there among my favorite anime from 2014.

HaNaYaMaTa: After watching the first episode, I found myself thinking that the animation was very bright and colorful. Also, all the female characters seemed to have a rather “cute” look to them, which gave the series a moe feel. Storywise, I thought HaNaYaMaTa was off to a decent start and appeared to have the foundation for an interesting story. At the time, I hoped that the series could continue in the style I saw in the first episode and not devolve into yet another “cute girls doing cute things” show. By the end of Episode Three, I had to give HaNaYaMaTa some credit for the fact that while it had a “moe” look and feel to it, the girls came across as actual characters and not as girls that fit various character types. There was also an overarching story that helped to keep a viewer interested, unlike many of the more recent moe type shows that seemed to focus more on vignettes and simply being cute rather than having much in the way of substance to its story. At the end of Episode Six, I was impressed by how the series’ plot kept the story moving and how the portrayal of the characters endeared them to the audience since they were actually characters and not simply character types. I appreciated HaNaYaMaTa for proving to me that a show with cute girls can actually have substance to it and be enjoyable to watch week after week. Unfortunately, I wasn’t as satisfied by the ending of HaNaYaMaTa as I hoped I would be. A major event happens at the end of Episode 11 that really affects the Yosakoi Club, but Episode 12 brings a resolution to that roadblock in such a way that I had a hard time using my “willing suspension of belief” or finding any way to the ending to be anywhere near realistic. Also, I thought there was a major loose end that was left resolved at the end of Episode 12. Overall, I did enjoy HaNaYaMaTa, even if I was a little disappointed in how the expected resolution with Hana ultimately transpired.

Love Stage!!: After watching the first episode, I saw that Love Stage!! was leaning more toward the comedic side; from what I saw, the comedy seemed to work for the story being told. I also thought that the series showed a lot of promise. Episode Three, however, made me a little uncomfortable when Ichijo tried to force Izumi to strip down and then became rather romantic toward him when he saw Izumi’s face. I wasn’t bothered by the fact that this scene featured two guys; in fact, it would have bothered me just as much if this scene had taken place between Ichijo and a female character. Honestly, if Shogo hadn’t come at just the right moment, Ichijo could have potentially raped Izumi. And that would not have been cool at all. But it still wasn’t cool how far Ichijo had managed to get before Shogo’s interference. By the end of Episode Four, it was very blatant that the series was heading into boys-love territory; as I watched the remainder of the series, I thought that the boys-love aspect was handled rather well. The series ended pretty much as I expected it to, with Izumi and Ichijo becoming a couple. With the way this episode ended, it could work as an ending for the series, but if there’s more content in the manga that hasn’t been covered, there could always be the potential for a second season if the first season performed well enough. As of this writing, there’s only been an OVA that’s been released in Japan in addition to the television anime series. Overall, I thought Love Stage!! was an ok series, but it’s not something I’d personally rush to see again anytime soon. I’m not saying that because it’s a boys-love title, because if this had been a series with a straight couple that was done in this manner, I’d feel the same way.

Terror in Resonance: After I watched the first episode, I thought the animation looked good, and that Yoko Kanno was delivering another good anime score. Story-wise, I thought the series was off to a promising start, even if it was a little slow to get going. Once the story started to become more established over the course of the episode, it intrigued me enough to keep my interest. By the end of Episode Five, it felt like the story had been kicked up a notch, due to the introduction of Five and the potential issues that Shibazaki faced in this episode. But at this point, I found myself not feeling terribly sure about Lisa as a character, because she just didn’t seem to have much of a purpose; she was starting to feel more like a prop than anything else. At the end of Episode Six, I found myself wondering if should truly be rooting for anyone. Nine and Twelve were the main characters, but I wasn’t sure I could root for them with everything they’d done up to that point. Five may have been affiliated with the authorities, but she was only looking out for her own interests, so I couldn’t root for her. Lisa still hadn’t done much of anything at that point, and the closest character there was to a “good guy” was Shibazaki. At the end of Episode 10, I was still rather frustrated with Lisa as a character. At this point, she’d either been a prop or becomes the “damsel in distress.” Also, I was also feeling frustrated by the overall lack of character development for both Nine and Twelve, who are supposed to be the main characters of the series. After finishing the series, I came to see how the series only touched on its themes and the majority of its characters on a purely surface level. The only character to truly have any character development was Shibazaki. Lisa seemed to have the least development; all we seem to know about her is the fact that she was being bullied and had an extremely clingy mother. Episode 12 made an attempt at trying to make Lisa a more important character in the series, but at that point, it was simply too little, too late. Two of the characters were killed at the end of the episode; however, since they were really only known to the audience on a surface level, it was hard to feel any kind of emotion when they died. Terror in Resonance is a story that had so much promise, but in the end, it didn’t deliver as I’d hoped. It’s got good animation, great music, and an interesting premise; unfortunately, the series was ultimately lacking in its overall execution. It reminds me a lot of cotton candy: it looks good, tastes great, but in the end it still leaves you feeling empty.

Tokyo ESP: After watching the first episode of Tokyo ESP, I thought that the animation was rather well-done. I also thought that there seemed to be an interesting idea being presented, but that the pacing felt a little on the sluggish side. I also found myself feeling rather confused, because the episode was done in such a way that it felt like it was being assumed that the audience already knew and understood what was taking place. With Episode Two, it became clear that the trick of starting at one point in the story and then backtracking to fill in the gaps to get back to where the story started was being utilized. After watching Episode Two, I did have a better impression of Tokyo ESP. But as the series continued, I found myself thinking that it probably would have made the series stronger if the second episode had been the first episode and had just gone in chronological order. By eliminating that first episode, the writers would have gained one episode that could have potentially allowed them to develop the characters or the story a little more. When the final episode concluded, it didn’t feel like the story had come to an end; in fact, it felt as if the stage was being set for a second season. However, there was nothing at the end of the episode to announce that another season would be coming in the future. After finishing Tokyo ESP, I found that I never was able to enjoy it as much as I’d hoped I would. The way the series started didn’t really help anything, since it left me so confused as to what was going on. When the actual story got going in Episode Two, the pacing of the story tended to feel slow, although not quite as slow as the first episode; but the pacing never really improved much after Episode Two. I also found that I just couldn’t get into the characters, not even into the characters who had some clearly defined development, such as Rinka and Kyotaro. Looking back, I realize I had this underlying sense of detachment from the characters. In the end, Tokyo ESP had an interesting concept behind it, but the execution just wasn’t as strong as it could have been.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

Winners of the 18th Japan Media Arts Festival Awards

The Japanese government’s Ministry of Cultural Affairs has announced the winners of the 18th Japan Media Arts Festival Awards.

Animation Division

Grand Prize:
The Wound (Anna Budanova)

Excellence Award:
Crayon Shin-chan: Serious Battle! Robot Dad Strikes Back! (Wataru Takahashi)
Giovanni’s Island (Mizuho Nishikubo)

New Face Award:
Tamako Love Story (Naoko Yamada)

Jury Selections:
Kill la Kill
Animated TV Series
Hiroyuki Imaishi & Kazuki Nakashima (Japan)

Ping Pong
Animated TV series
Masaaki Yuasa (Japan)

Mushishi: The Next Chapter
Animated TV series
Hiroshi Nagahama (Japan)

Terror in Resonance
Animated TV series
Shinichiro Watanabe (Japan)

Stand By Me Doraemon
Animated feature film
Ryuichi Yagi & Takashi Yamazaki (Japan)

Manga Division

Grand Prize:
Goshiki no Fune (Youko Kondo with original story by Yasumi Tsuhara)

Excellence Award:
Aoi Hono (Kazuhiko Shimamoto)
Harukaze no Sunegurachika (Hiroaki Samura)
Hitsuji no Ki (Mikio Igarashi with original story by Tatsuhiko Yamagami)

New Face Award:
Ai o Kurae!! (Renaissance Yoshida)
Dobugawa – Our life is connected. (Aoi Ikebe)

Jury Selections:
Nobunaga Concerto
Ayumi Ishii (Japan)

Inuyashiki
Hiroya Oku (Japan)

One-Punch Man
ONE & Yuusuke Murata (Japan)

Source: ANN

Anime Spotlight: Terror in Resonance

Terror in Resonance is an anime series produced by MAPPA and directed by Shinichiro Watanabe. In addition, the music was produced by Yoko Kanno. The series aired on Japanese television from July 10-September 25, 2014. As of this writing, FUNimation Entertainment holds the North American streaming rights for Terror in Resonance.

At the beginning of the first episode, the audience is shown a terrorist attack that takes place at a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The audience sees that there are two terrorists involved in the incident.

The story then jumps ahead six months, and the setting is now in Tokyo. Two boys, who call each other Nine and Twelve, are transferring into school there. They see a girl named Lisa Mishima being bullied by several girls, and Twelve intervenes.

We see the two of them being introduced as transfer students: Nine is introduced as Arata Kokonoe, while Twelve is introduced as Toji Hisami. Twelve ends up being in the same class as Lisa.

Meanwhile, a group of men that includes one named Shibazaki, find a video online labeled as “Sphinx Weather Forecast.” There are two guys wearing masks, and they give a weather report: “Tokyo will be enveloped by darkness after 3 p.m. Large sparks will fly, scattered around the Shinjuku area. Use caution when leaving the house.” Most of the guys think it’s an early summer vacation prank, but Shibazaki isn’t so sure.

We learn that Nine has a recurring nightmare about kids at an institution that couldn’t be saved because they were weak.

The next day, Nine and Twelve are at a public building, where they cause a blackout so they can hide explosives around the building. Lisa is also there, and Twelve comes across her. He hands her one of the explosives, which is hidden inside a stuffed toy, and tells her to promise him that she won’t let go of it until he says she can.

Twelve rejoins Nine as the lights come back on, and Nine uses his cell phone to start activating the explosives. Twelve tells Nine about Lisa, and they call her cell phone. Nine gives Lisa two options: she can either die or become their accomplice. Since she doesn’t want to die, she becomes their accomplice.

We learn that Lisa also comes from a home where her mother is very clingy because Lisa’s father ran out on them. Lisa doesn’t want to deal with her anymore, so she runs away from home and eventually comes to stay with Nine and Twelve.

As Nine and Twelve continue to confound the authorities with riddles and bombs, Shibazaki takes on the case, and it becomes a kind of game of cat and mouse. As the series progresses, a new character named Five is introduced, and she’s made it her personal mission to take down Nine and Twelve.

After I watched the first episode, I thought the animation looked good, and that Yoko Kanno was delivering another good anime score. Story-wise, I thought the series was off to a promising start, even if it was a little slow to get going. Once the story started to become more established over the course of the episode, it intrigued me enough to keep my interest.

By the end of Episode Five, it felt like the story had been kicked up a notch, due to the introduction of Five and the potential issues that Shibazaki faced in this episode. But at this point, I found myself not feeling terribly sure about Lisa as a character, because she just didn’t seem to have much of a purpose. She was starting to feel more like a prop than anything else.

At the end of Episode Six, I found myself wondering if should truly be rooting for anyone. Nine and Twelve were the main characters, but I wasn’t sure I could root for them with everything they’d done up to that point. Five may have been affiliated with the authorities, but she was only looking out for her own interests, so I couldn’t root for her. Lisa still hadn’t done much of anything at that point, and the closest character there was to a “good guy” was Shibazaki.

At the end of Episode 10, I was still rather frustrated with Lisa as a character. At this point, she’d either been a prop or becomes the “damsel in distress.” Also, I was also feeling frustrated by the overall lack of character development for both Nine and Twelve, who are supposed to be the main characters of the series.

After finishing the series, I came to see how it only touched on its themes and most of its characters on a purely surface level. The only character to truly have any character development was Shibazaki. Lisa seemed to have the least development; all we seem to know about her is the fact that she was being bullied and had an extremely clingy mother. Episode 12 attempted to make Lisa a more important character in the series, but at that point, it was simply too little, too late. Two of the characters were killed at the end of the episode. However, since they were only known to the audience on a surface level, it was hard to feel any kind of emotion when they died.

Terror in Resonance is a story that had so much promise, but in the end, it didn’t deliver as I’d hoped. It’s got good animation, great music, and an interesting premise. Unfortunately, the series was ultimately lacking in its overall execution. It reminds me a lot of cotton candy: it looks good, tastes great, but in the end it still leaves you feeling empty.

I’m glad I was able to watch Terror in Resonance as it was streaming, but it’s not a series I’m going to be in a hurry to watch again or to add to my anime home video collection.

Additional Anime Spotlights:

Terror in Resonance: Episode 11 – “VON”

Terror in Resonance focuses on two teenagers who are also terrorists known as Sphinx: Arata Kokonoe (who is also known by the name Nine) and Toji Hisami (who is also known by the name Twelve). We first see them stealing plutonium from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The story then skips ahead in time six months, and the two of them attack a Tokyo government office. Lisa Mishima, a girl in Twelve’s class, ends up being at the wrong place at the wrong time and becomes an accomplice to their crime in order to save her life.

The focus of the first half of Episode 12 is on the atomic bomb that Nine threatened to detonate at the end of Episode 11. Through talking with his daughter, Shibazaki learns how Nine can detonate the bomb and not kill anyone by sending up into the stratosphere. With this information, Shibazaki is able to get the police and the government to take action. It’s very tense, especially when it’s revealed that any aircraft in the sky at the time it goes off that doesn’t have anti-EMP equipment will crash; this covers all of the Japanese planes. Fortunately, everything is able to work out as best as it can when the explosion happens; the only major thing that happens is that electricity is knocked out all over Japan.

The second half of the episode sees Nine, Twelve, and Lisa getting to spend some time having fun together. That night, Shibazaki finds them and reveals what he’s figured out about their motives. Nine and Twelve wanted to be caught all along to bring what happened to them to light, and that they wanted Shibazaki to be the one to catch them. Just as Shibazaki places them under arrest, the U.S. forces, who have anti-EMP equipment in their aircraft, arrive. Two characters die over the course of this scene, and then one of the other characters is seen a year later and provides a voice-over to explain what’s happened.

Now that I’ve finished watching Terror in Resonance, I’ve come to see how the series only touches on its themes and the majority of its characters on a purely surface level. The only character to truly have any character development was Shibazaki. Lisa seemed to have the least development; all we seem to know about her is the fact that she was being bullied and had an extremely clingy mother. Episode 12 made an attempt at trying to make Lisa a more important character in the series, but at that point, it was simply too little, too late. And since the characters who were killed were really only known to the audience on a surface level, it was hard to feel any kind of emotion when they died.

Terror in Resonance is a story that had so much promise, but in the end, it didn’t deliver as I’d hoped. It’s got good animation, great music, and an interesting premise; unfortunately, the series was ultimately lacking in its overall execution. It reminds me a lot of cotton candy: it looks good, tastes great, but in the end it still leaves you feeling empty.

I’m glad I was able to watch Terror in Resonance as it was streaming, but it’s not a series I’m going to be in a hurry to watch again or to add to my anime home video collection.

Additional posts about Terror in Resonance:

Terror in Resonance: Episode 10 – “Helter Skelter”

Terror in Resonance focuses on two teenagers who are also terrorists known as Sphinx: Arata Kokonoe (who is also known by the name Nine) and Toji Hisami (who is also known by the name Twelve). We first see them stealing plutonium from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The story then skips ahead in time six months, and the two of them attack a Tokyo government office. Lisa Mishima, a girl in Twelve’s class, ends up being at the wrong place at the wrong time and becomes an accomplice to their crime in order to save her life.

A lot of Episode 10 jumps around between focusing on Nine, Five, and Shibazaki. Nine surprises everyone when he turns himself in as Sphinx Number 1 and as he’s being interrogated, he makes certain demands and says if they aren’t met, he’ll set off the atomic bomb that he and Twelve stole before the two of them came to this city.

While this is going on, Shibazaki goes to question Mamiya about the Athena Plan. And after Five awakens in the hospital, she decides to bust out to capture Five herself; unbeknownst to her, her underling is plotting something behind her back.

While the section with Shibazaki and Mamiya is basically talking, this is made up for by the action that takes place for Five and Nine. Twelve becomes part of this action, but it’s not until near the end of the episode; the few times we see him and Lisa prior to this point, they really don’t do much.

The storyline with Five took a turn I hadn’t expected, and I’m not sure I entirely like that turn. It just felt out of character and a little too convenient. It’s almost like the writers had written themselves into a corner with her and couldn’t figure out how to resolve her storyline, so they took an easy way out.

At this point, with one episode left, I’m rather frustrated with Lisa’s character. For a lot of the series, she’s either served as a prop for the main characters, or she becomes the “damsel in distress” who has to be saved (usually by Twelve). And while we may finally have some background information for both Nine and Twelve, they’ve never truly been developed as characters.

Even with the criticisms I have, I’m still interested in seeing how Terror in Resonance will come to an end.

Additional posts about Terror in Resonance:

Terror in Resonance: Episode 9 – “Highs & Lows”

Terror in Resonance focuses on two teenagers who are also terrorists known as Sphinx: Arata Kokonoe (who is also known by the name Nine) and Toji Hisami (who is also known by the name Twelve). We first see them stealing plutonium from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The story then skips ahead in time six months, and the two of them attack a Tokyo government office. Lisa Mishima, a girl in Twelve’s class, ends up being at the wrong place at the wrong time and becomes an accomplice to their crime in order to save her life.

The first half of Episode Nine focuses on exposition. Shibazaki tracks down Aoki, the point of contact he found for the Athena Plan. It’s revealed that they gathered 26 children to be test subjects to try to reproduce the savant syndrome artificially and create humans with abilities beyond the norm. Two subjects escaped; of course, they’re Nine and Twelve. Of the remaining 24, only one survived: Five. It’s hinted that due to the experiments done on these three, they may not have much longer to live. But the real bombshell for Shibazaki is learning that Dr. Mamiya, the reason for Shibazaki’s demotion years earlier, was in charge of the Athena Project.

So we finally get the remaining pieces of the puzzle to figure out Five, Nine, and Twelve’s backstory that had been hinted at for so long in the series. It was also interesting to learn that Shibazaki, who had decided to tackle this case, ended up having a personal connection to the case that he hadn’t been aware of before now. It was never outright said during the discussion with Aoki, but I have a hunch that Shibazaki pieced together that the two kids who ran away from the project are the ones behind Sphinx. I’m wondering how Shibazaki’s involvement in the story will continue beyond this point.

Twelve finds that Lisa is trapped in a ferris wheel car with several bombs. When he goes into the car, it shuts behind him and the ferris wheel starts up. Twelve starts trying to disarm the bombs within a rather short time frame. But during this, there’s a touching scene of Lisa apologizing for going off on her own and being captured, and Twelve telling her it’s not her fault. I swear there were some shots in here that came across as trying to convey that Twelve thinks of Lisa more than just a friend. When Five calls Twelve in the ferris wheel car, we learn that what Nine and Twelve got several months earlier wasn’t plutonium; it was something else. After some egging on, Twelve blurts out where the object is hidden.

But as the scene is unfolding in the ferris wheel car, Five starts looking like she’s in pain, and even puts her head in her hands. It looks like Aoki’s comment about these kids not having much longer to live may be coming to fruition.

For most of the episode, we only see Nine briefly. However, he makes a major appearance right at the end of the episode, and it looks like his life is potentially in danger…

Episode Nine revealed some very important information to the audience for what happened to lead up to this story that we’ve been following since Nine and Twelve arrived in the city. It also provided higher stakes for several of the main characters, and this seems to have already affected Five. Will Nine and Twelve also be affected by this before the end of the series? If so, how will this affect the story?

There’s only two more episodes remaining for Terror in Resonance, and I’m wondering how the story will play out over these remaining episodes. It looks like the police are about to get their hands on the object that Nine and Twelve stole and are now hiding, so I suspect that will play an important role in Episode 10. Outside of that, I really have no idea what else this series will do in order to wrap up the story.

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Terror in Resonance: Episode 8 – “My Fair Lady”

Terror in Resonance focuses on two teenagers who are also terrorists known as Sphinx: Arata Kokonoe (who is also known by the name Nine) and Toji Hisami (who is also known by the name Twelve). We first see them stealing plutonium from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The story then skips ahead in time six months, and the two of them attack a Tokyo government office. Lisa Mishima, a girl in Twelve’s class, ends up being at the wrong place at the wrong time and becomes an accomplice to their crime in order to save her life.

Episode Eight sees Shibazaki and his men being punished for disobeying orders; while Shibazaki’s men are suspended for three months and taken off the case, Shibazaki is suspended for an indefinite period of time and is asked to leave his badge. At this point, Shibazaki decides to investigate the case on his own, and one of his men decides to help him out.

Shibazaki’s investigation unearths some very interesting information, and it’s information that begins to start explaining about the institution that Nine, Twelve, and Five all came from; there was a project testing orphans for gifted children implemented by the Rising Peace Academy, a group that had some significant support from politicians. The investigation ultimately nets him a potential point of contact, and he calls in a favor to someone he knows in order to find out more about this point of contact and about the program itself. Shibazaki is able to get the answers that he needs.

And it was neat to see in this episode that Shibazaki has a daughter who’s going to college and studying in the department of science and engineering. Admittedly, his main reason to go see her was for his investigation in order to get answers to some questions, but it was nice to see him interacting with a member of his family instead of someone else on the police force.

Meanwhile, Five has been following Lisa’s movements, and a package is delivered to her at Nine and Twelve’s hideout. Unfortunately, Lisa wasn’t very smart and didn’t question the fact that a package was sent to her there. She accepts it and discovers that a note on the package declares that there’s a bomb inside. Fortunately, all three of them are outside when it goes off; unfortunately, this means that they have to find a new hideout.

This episode also sees Twelve wondering if he and Nine should stop what they’re doing. Nine keeps trying to convince him that they have something to do, and Twelve argues that they shouldn’t involve Lisa in this anymore. Near the end of the episode, Lisa leaves a note for the two guys and runs off, and Twelve takes it upon himself to find Lisa over Nine’s objections.

I’ve been having a sense that Twelve’s resolve for his and Nine’s plan was starting to waver. I’d also been getting the sense that Twelve was also starting to care for Lisa as well; I’m not sure if he sees her as a friend or if he’s interested in more than friendship, but he definitely was looking out for her recently.

And now Lisa has found herself in another predicament involving Five that’s going to draw Twelve and Nine to her. I suspect the last three episodes will focus on Five taking on Nine and Twelve, while Shibazaki continues to act independently to try to crack the case.

Terror in Resonance has had a great buildup for the story, and I’m hoping the climax and ending will bring about a satisfactory resolution for this story. I’m really looking forward to seeing how this series will continue and to find out what will happen to the major characters.

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Terror in Resonance: Episode 7 – “Deuce”

Terror in Resonance focuses on two teenagers who are also terrorists known as Sphinx: Arata Kokonoe (who is also known by the name Nine) and Toji Hisami (who is also known by the name Twelve). We first see them stealing plutonium from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Aomori, Japan. The story then skips ahead in time six months, and the two of them attack a Tokyo government office. Lisa Mishima, a girl in Twelve’s class, ends up being at the wrong place at the wrong time and becomes an accomplice to their crime in order to save her life.

Episode Seven focuses on the game of chess that Five is playing against Nine at the airport. Shibazaki and his men arrive in the midst of this, and discover that the police are somehow involved in the plot.

With that going on, Twelve figures out the blind spots of the security cameras and tries to make it so Five loses track of him. Unfortunately, she takes the security camera footage they have of him and distributes it to airport security so they can find him.

As the episode continues, you can see just how much Five is manipulating the police. I thought it was rather sickening what lengths that Five went to. She seems to have no regard for the lives of others, since what she does in the climax has the potential to injure and kill a lot of people. Talk about an abuse of power! And it was even more sickening to realize that the police were going along with this in the name of being given orders to do so.

Lisa finally gets in on the action, although she’s hesitant to do so at first. But her actions help Nine accomplish something in order to try to trick Five. But Five finds security camera footage of Lisa and knows of her involvement. The climax of the episode sees Five using Lisa in order to try to corner Nine and Twelve.

I had to feel bad for Lisa. After she’d tried so hard to find a way to fit in and help Nine and Twelve, she ends up being kidnapped and used by Five and her cronies. I wonder if what happens in this episode may cause Lisa to rethink being around Nine and Twelve, or if she’s in so deep now that there’s no way for her to get out.

While I liked the fact that Shibazaki ended up being a major hero in this episode, he’s now become just as much of a target for Five as Nine and Twelve are. It’s also made clear at the end of the episode that even Lisa has now become one of her targets.

The one thing I don’t quite understand yet is why Five hates Nine and Twelve so much and is driven to get them like she is. All we’ve seen is a flashback of Nine and Five when they were younger and playing a game of chess. But for some reason, I don’t think that entirely explains what’s going on. Hopefully Five’s motivations will become clearer in the remaining episodes of the series.

I should also mention that I won’t have a write-up for Terror in Resonance next week, because Episode Eight is delayed a week due to the episode not airing in Japan. And since I’m currently a week behind, it means that I won’t have a simulcast stream to watch next week. The write-ups for Terror in Resonance on this blog will continue on September 12, 2014.

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