Harvey Awards Induct Rumiko Takahashi Into Its Hall of Fame

The organizers of the Harvey Awards, which honor outstanding work in comics and sequential art, has announced that they will induct manga creator Rumiko Takahashi as one of five new members for their Hall of Fame this year, alongside Bernie Wrightson, Jeffrey Catherine Jones, Barry Windsor-Smith, and Michael Kaluta.

Since making her debut in 1978, Takahashi has created such manga as Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku, Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, Ranma 1/2, One-Pound Gospel, Inuyasha, RIN-NE, and Mao. In her career of over four decades, many of her works have become internationally popular and inspired anime and live-action adaptations. Takahashi’s Inuyasha manga is also inspiring a currently airing anime spin-off titled Yashahime: Princess Half-Demon.

The virtual screening of the Harvey Awards will take place on October 8, 2021 during New York Comic Con.

Source: ANN

Yoshiyuki Tomino, Rumiko Takahashi, and Hidenori Murata Receive Government Cultural Honor

Japan’s Agency for Cultural Affairs has announced that Mobile Suit Gundam creator Yoshiyuki Tomino, manga creator Rumiko Takahashi, and anime studio Eiken founder Hidenori Murata will receive its Commissioner for Cultural Affairs award for the year Reiwa 1, which began on May 1, 2019. The award honors “individuals who have made distinguished accomplishment in artistic and cultural activities.”

The announcement said, “Over many years, as [Tomino] released a multitude of great works as an animation director, he has endeavored for the growth of the next generation and made a great contribution to the promotion of Japan’s arts and culture.” The announcement included a similar remark about Murata. The award staff said of Takahashi, “As she released a multitude of great works as a manga creator over many years, she has been endowed with remarkable achievements inside and outside Japan, and she has made a great contribution to the promotion of [Japan’s] arts and culture.”

A total of 74 people will receive the award for Reiwa 1. An awards ceremony will be held at the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Auditorium 2 on December 6, 2019.

Source: ANN

Rumiko Takahashi Wins Angoulême Grand Prix 2019 Prize

The 46th Angoulême International Comics Festival has announced that manga creator Rumiko Takahashi received the Grand Prix d’Angoulême, which is an award that honors the author’s lifetime body of work. The award entitles Takahashi to be the marshal for the 2020 awards.

This year’s Angoulême Festival runs from January 24-27, 2019 in the Angoulême area of France.

Source: ANN

VIZ Media Announces the Release of Urusei Yatsura Signature Editions

VIZ Media announces the return of the classic manga comedy Urusei Yatsura in all-new deluxe editions on February 19, 2019.

Set for publication under the VIZ Signature imprint, Urusei Yatsura depicts the hilarious misadventures of an unlucky human boy who meets a beautiful alien princess. The series is rated “T+” for Older Teens; Volume 1 will carry a print MSRP of $19.99 U.S. / $26.99 CAN. Urusei Yatsura‘s volumes will present 400 pages of content in the larger VIZ Signature trim size. The complete series is scheduled for English publication by VIZ Media on a quarterly basis.

In Urusei Yatsura, beautiful space alien princess Lum invades Earth on her UFO, and unlucky Ataru Moroboshi’s world gets turned upside down. Will Lum become Earth’s electrifying new leader? Or will Ataru somehow miraculously save Earth from space alien onslaught?

Urusei Yatsura is an iconic manga series, and until now, has never been fully published in English,” says Amy Yu, Editor. “Our new VIZ Signature editions allow readers to enjoy the complete Urusei Yatsura for the first time ever. We hope new and veteran manga fans will add this legendary series to their collections!”

The spotlight on Rumiko Takahashi’s career began in 1978 when she won an honorable mention in Shogakukan’s prestigious New Comic Artist Contest for Those Selfish Aliens. Later that same year, her boy-meets-alien comedy series, Urusei Yatsura, was serialized in Weekly Shonen Sunday. This phenomenally successful manga series was adapted into anime format and spawned a TV series and half a dozen theatrical-release movies, all incredibly popular in their own right. Takahashi followed up the success of her debut series with one blockbuster hit after another—Maison Ikkoku ran from 1980 to 1987, Ranma 1/2 from 1987 to 1996, and Inuyasha from 1996 to 2008. Other notable works include Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, One-Pound Gospel, and RIN-NE.

Takahashi was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame in 2018. She won the prestigious Shogakukan Manga Award twice in her career, once for Urusei Yatsura in 1981 and the second time for Inuyasha in 2002. A majority of the Takahashi canon has been adapted into other media such as anime, live-action TV series, and film. Takahashi’s manga, as well as the other formats her work has been adapted into, have continued to delight generations of fans around the world. Distinguished by her wonderfully endearing characters, Takahashi’s work adeptly incorporates a wide variety of elements such as comedy, romance, fantasy, and martial arts. While her series are difficult to pin down into one simple genre, the signature style she has created has come to be known as the “Rumic World.” Rumiko Takahashi is an artist who truly represents the very best from the world of manga.

VIZ Media Announces New Publishing Titles Set to Debut in Early 2019

VIZ Media expands its publishing catalog with a variety of new acquisitions announced during its official panel events held at Comic-Con International 2018.

The new titles are scheduled for release beginning early in 2019 and include My Hero Academia: School Briefs, the first of three prose short story collections based on the superhero action series created by Kohei Horikoshi. Rumiko Takahashi’s manga series Urusei Yatsura receives a new large trim edition, and Hiromu Arakawa brings us hilarious four-panel comics from the world of Fullmetal Alchemist. Two new Nausicaa books, The Art of Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind and Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind Picture Book were also announced. Each book features Studio Ghibli art from director Hayao Miyazaki.

Additional information on each of these titles will be announced in the near future.

MY HERO ACADEMIA: SCHOOL BRIEFS
by Kohei Horikoshi and Anri Yoshi
Debuts Spring 2019

The U.A. High School hero course teaches young hopefuls everything they need to become heroes. Between killer events like the sports festival and internships, there’s even a Parents’ Day. Life is never dull for the students of U.A. High.

URUSEI YATSURA
by Rumiko Takahashi
Rated “T+” for Older Teens
Debuts Winter 2019

Revisit the acclaimed romantic comedy about an unlucky human boy who meets a beautiful space alien princess in this large trim size edition with all-new translations and new cover designs. In the series, Ataru Moroboshi’s supernatural encounters with the feminine kind all start when he’s chosen to play tag with an alien princess named Lum who invades the earth on her UFO. Ataru has ten days to touch Lum’s horns or aliens will take over the earth. As it turns out, the game of tag is only the beginning of Ataru’s troubles, as he continues to attract strange encounters with otherworldly beings like beautiful snow spirit Oyuki and the sexy crow goblin Princess Kurama.

FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST: THE COMPLETE FOUR-PANEL COMICS
by Hiromu Arakawa
Rated “T” for Teens
Debuts Spring 2019

Collects all of author Hiromu Arakawa’s beloved four-panel comic strips from the graphic novel series, her bonus strips from the anime DVDs of Fullmetal Alchemist and Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood and rare strips from Japan. No joke is too cheesy and there are no sacred cows when Arakawa takes up her pen to spoof her own characters in this delightfully zany take on Fullmetal Alchemist.

THE ART OF NAUSICAA OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND
by Hayao Miyazaki
Debuts Spring 2019

Hayao Miyazaki’s Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind, based on his own manga, was released in 1984 and has been a cult classic ever since. In a long-ago war, humankind set off a devastating ecological disaster. The earth is slowly submerging beneath the expanding Sea of Corruption, an enormous toxic forest that creates mutant insects and poisonous spores. Beyond the sea lies the Valley of the Wind, a kingdom of barely 500 citizens and home to Nausicaa, who risks everything to save her people and bring peace and health to the valley. Includes sketches, developmental water colors, cel animation, and more.

NAUSICAA OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND PICTURE BOOK
by Hayao Miyazaki
Debuts Spring 2019

In a long-ago war, humankind set off a devastating ecological disaster. The earth is slowly submerging beneath the expanding Sea of Corruption, an enormous toxic forest that creates mutant insects and releases a miasma of poisonous spores into the air. At the periphery of the sea, lies the Valley of the Wind, a kingdom of barely 500 citizens; a nation given fragile protection from the decaying sea’s poisons by the ocean breezes; and home to Nausicaa, who risks everything to save her people and bring peace and health to the valley. Includes scene-by-scene illustrations and character dialogue from the film in a double-length picture book.

Rumiko Takahashi Inducted Into the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame

The 2018 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards inducted manga creator Rumiko Takahashi into the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame on July 21, 2018. This was Takahashi’s fourth time being nominated for the award, with judges previously nominating her in 2017, 2016, and 2014. Takahashi was nominated alongside 15 others this year.

In her career of over three decades, Takahashi created such manga series as Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku, Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, Ranma 1/2, One-Pound Gospel, Inuyasha, and RIN-NE. Many of her works became internationally popular and inspired anime and live-action adaptations. Her works have a combined 200 million copies in print.

Creative professionals working in the comics or related industries, publishers, editors, retailers (comics store owner or manager), graphic novels librarians, and comics historians/educators voted online for the award.

Source: ANN

Rumiko Takahashi Nominated for the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame

Comic-Con International has announced that the Eisner Awards judges have nominated manga creator Rumiko Takahashi for the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame in 2018. She is part of a selection of 16 nominees, four of whom will be selected by vote to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. This is Takahashi’s fourth nomination, with judges previously nominating her in 2017, 2016, and 2014.

Takahashi created such manga series as Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku, Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, Ranma 1/2, One-Pound Gospel, Inuyasha, and RIN-NE.

Creative professionals working in the comics or related industries, publishers, editors, retailers (comics store owner or manager), graphic novels librarians, and comics historians/educators can vote online now for four nominees, and the vote will continue until March 16, 2018.

Source: ANN

Rumiko Takahashi Is Nominated for Eisner Hall of Fame

Comic-Con International has announced that the Eisner Awards judges have selected two individuals for the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame this year, as well as 14 nominees for four more inductees. The two pre-selected inductees are Carl Burgos and Tove Jansson. The 14 nominees for this year’s four remaining spots are Lynda Barry, Kim Deitch, Rube Goldberg, Edward Gorey, Bill Griffith, Matt Groening, Jack Kamen, Francoise Mouly, George Perez, Antonio Prohias, P. Craig Russell, Rumiko Takahashi, Jacques Tardi, and Herb Trimpe.

In her career of over three decades, Takahashi has created such manga series as Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku, Mermaid Saga, Rumic Theater, Ranma 1/2, One-Pound Gospel, Inuyasha, and RIN-NE. Many of her works became internationally popular and inspired anime and live-action adaptations. She appeared at the convention in 1994 and 2000. Takahashi also received an Eisner Hall of Fame nomination in 2014.

This year’s judges are journalist/reviewer Brian Doherty, comics writer/editor Danny Fingeroth, retailer Jason Grazulis (BSI Comics, Metairie, LA), librarian Jason M. Poole (Webster Public Library, Webster, NY), Comic-Con International board member Natalie Powell, and academic/scholar Carol Tilley (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

Creative professionals working in the comics or related industries, publishers, editors, retailers (comics store owner or manager), graphic novels librarians, and comics historians/educators can vote online now for four nominees, and the vote will continue until April 1, 2016.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: RIN-NE Volume 18

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

RIN-NE Volume 18 focuses on Rinne Rokudo, a boy who is half-human and half-shinigami. He becomes friends with Sakura Mamiya, a high school girl with an ability to see ghosts. They find themselves investigating strange happenings alongside Rinne’s Black Cat Contract, Rokumon, and Tsubasa Jumonji, a young exorcist who has strong feelings for Sakura.

RIN-NE Volume 18
Written by: Rumiko Takahashi
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: July 14, 2015

Volume 18 places a bit of its focus on the Black Cats. The first chapter sees Rokumon and the other cats going on a mushroom hunt, with an emphasis on Rokumon’s group. Instead of trying to find mushrooms, they decide to hunt down Eat-Eat Shrooms because they’re worth more. The humor in this chapter derives from Rokumon and his friends trying to capture the Eat-Eat Shrooms and not succeeding. This story falls into the realm of the light-hearted tales that don’t have as much focus on Rinne and don’t truly progress the story. Admittedly, I’m not as big of a fan of these stories in RIN-NE as I am of the stories that focus on Rinne and Sakura and their interactions.

Near the end of the volume, the reader is introduced to Sansei Kuroboshi, the grandson of Tamako’s Black Cat Contract. Tamako has asked Rinne to help train Sansei to work for her so the elder Kuroboshi can retire. As can be imagined in a series like RIN-NE, the results of the training are on the humorous side. And the humor with the training is accentuated by the twist that Tamako reveals at the end of the story. While the reader finds the ending funny, it’s safe to say that Rinne himself doesn’t appreciate it.

Volume 18 also sees some one-off stories, such as a ghost who refuses to leave a bed in the school nurse’s office, an adventure with a pot magistrate found in a pot that Ageha brings over, a story about a haunted coat and a mannequin, Rinne and Sakura helping Tamako to clean up her home in the spirit world, a mystery surrounding a haunted snowman, and Masato trying to trick Rinne with a lockbox made of ice.

Of these one-off stories, my favorite was the one where Rinne and Sakura help Tamako with her cleaning. I liked getting to see the photos in Tamako’s photo albums from when Rinne was younger. But it was amusing when pictures of Rinne’s father are mistaken for Rinne, because the behaviors shown in the picture are not what a reader would associate with Rinne. My least favorite story in the whole volume was the one with the haunted coat and the mannequin, because it was just strange, even by RIN-NE‘s standards.

There’s also a two-chapter story that focuses on Renge, a girl who works for Rinne’s father’s Damashigami Company and has a crush on Kain, a registrar in the afterlife. Rinne’s father is trying to give her a bonus, but Kain and Rinne are both after him. Matters are made worse because Renge hides the fact she’s a Damashigami from Kain, so it looks like she’s being a double agent. As we’ve come to know in the series, Rinne’s father, Sabato, is a real jerk, and he lives up to that reputation in this story. And as I’ve come to expect from RIN-NE, theress a twist at the end that brings about disappointment for at least one of the characters.

At this point, I seem to have become accustomed to the character designs in RIN-NE, because I didn’t find myself thinking that certain characters looked similar to Takahashi’s other characters. As I read this volume, I only thought of each character as looking like a character from RIN-NE. Perhaps watching the current anime adaptation of the series has helped me with that perception.

RIN-NE Volume 18 continues the light-hearted and episodic feel that this series has become known for. Readers who have been following RIN-NE will find the humor, plot twists, and themes that they’ve come to expect.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional post about RIN-NE:

Manga Review: RIN-NE Volume 17

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

RIN-NE Volume 17 focuses on a high school girl named Sakura Mamiya who gained the ability to see ghosts when she was a child. She befriends Rinne Rokudo, a boy who is half-human and half-shinigami. Sakura and Rinne work together to investigate strange happenings and to guide spirits whose regrets keep them from moving on to the afterlife. They are joined by Rokumon, Rinne’s Black Cat Contract, and Tsubasa Jumonji, a young exorcist who has strong feelings for Sakura.

RIN-NE Volume 17
Written by: Rumiko Takahashi
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: March 10, 2015

Volume 17 opens with Rinne, Sakura, and Tsubasa investigating a male member of their school’s Folk Song Club who appears to have become a cicada. Sakura and Rinne have to come up with the clues they need to piece everything together and to turn this young man back to normal. This was a decent story, although in some respects, it was also a little on the strange side. It wasn’t the worst story to appear in Volume 17, but it wasn’t among the best, either.

The next four chapters all deal with some kind of cursed object. First, there’s a cursed scythe that causes mayhem for Rinne and the other characters. Next is a cursed tatami mat in the Tea Ceremony Club’s room, which is then followed by a story about a cursed cashbox. Finally, there’s a chapter about a cursed straw doll. By the time I reached the chapter about the cursed straw doll, I was getting a little tired of reading yet another chapter about Rinne and his friends dealing with some kind of cursed object. The only positives I have to say about this set of chapters is that the story about the cursed cashbox allowed the reader to get to see Rinne’s father, while the chapter about the cursed straw doll focused more on Renge and Ageha, a couple of characters who aren’t seen as much as Rinne, Sakura, or Tsubasa. While the story about the scythe focused on the characters of Right and Left, I found myself getting annoyed by these two particular characters rather quickly.

The remaining three stories in Volume 17 all involve a spirit in some way. The first of these chapters sees Rinne, Sakura, Tsubasa, and Renge competing in a relay race for their school’s athletics festival, but they have to practice on the lane of the track that’s haunted by the spirit of a student. The second spirit story sees Right and Left building a shrine and trying to summon the guardian spirit of scythe-smithing. The final spirit story sees Rinne, Sakura, and Tsubasa investigating a stray komainu shrine dog spirit and encountering the disembodied spirit of a shrine maiden who has a past connection with Tsubasa.

Of these final three stories, my favorite was the one about the stray komainu shrine dog spirit and the disembodied spirit of a shrine maiden. This particular story provided some character development for Tsubasa, and it makes him have to start seeing that perhaps he shouldn’t just set his sights on Sakura. The spirit haunting the school’s track was a decent story, and the other story featuring Right and Left just felt rather weak in comparison to most of the other stories that appeared in RIN-NE Volume 17.

When it comes to Takahashi’s character designs for RIN-NE, she seems to be relying on more blatant recycling of older character designs than she had in her previous works. Just off the top of my head, I can see that three of the major characters seem to have had their designs based on characters from Inuyasha, while another character looks rather similar to Kodachi Kuno from Ranma 1/2. Unfortunately, I find that these recycled character designs tend to distract me from what I’m reading, because I have to remind myself that the person I’m seeing on the page isn’t one of the characters from other series who had their design modified for RIN-NE.

So far, I have to say that RIN-NE hasn’t grabbed me like Ranma 1/2 or Inuyasha did. It’s hard to explain, but there’s something that those two series had that seems to be lacking in RIN-NE. I also can’t help but think that the concept of Rinne guiding spirits whose regrets keep them from moving on to the afterlife could have been inspired by the Bleach franchise. To me, it feels like Takahashi has gotten a little lazier with both her character designs and her writing for this series. There really was no good reason to have four chapters back to back that focused on cursed objects, and then having three stories back to back that focused on spirits. While this probably wouldn’t have been as noticeable during RIN-NE‘s weekly serialization, it becomes obvious when these chapters are grouped together into a single volume.

Readers who have been reading and following the series up to this point may enjoy reading RIN-NE Volume 17. Long-time fans of Takahashi’s work who haven’t read RIN-NE yet could potentially be distracted by the noticeable recycling of character designs or be disappointed in the fact that the series seems to lack the ingredient that made Ranma 1/2 and Inuyasha so endearing to manga and anime fans alike.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about RIN-NE: