The Nisekoi: False Love Manga to Get a New Spin-off Chapter

The second 2019 issue of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine has announced that Naoshi Komi will draw a spin-off chapter for the Nisekoi: False Love manga in the magazine’s next issue on December 17, 2018.

The manga will commemorate the release of the live-action film adaptation, which opens in Japan on December 21, 2018. The manga itself will center on Raku getting tickets for “a certain movie” as he is coming home from school one day.

Komi drew the original “Nisekoi” one shot manga in Shueisha’s Jump Next! magazine in early 2011, and turned it into a manga series in Weekly Shonen Jump in November 2011. The manga ended in August 2016. VIZ Media published the manga in English.

Source: ANN

Naoshi Komi to Draw New One Shot With English Release

The combined fourth and fifth 2018 issue of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine has announced that Naoshi Komi will publish a one shot manga about eSports titled “e no Genten” (The Origin of e) in the magazine’s next issue on January 4, 2018. The one shot will also run in the next issue of VIZ Media’s digital Shonen Jump on January 8, 2018.

The one shot is part of a series of one shots by well-known manga creators that Weekly Shonen Jump is publishing to commemorate the magazine’s 50th anniversary in 2018.

Komi ended Nisekoi – False Love in August 2016 and then published a one shot manga titled “Tokidoki” in October 2016.

Source: ANN

Creators of Bleach, Nisekoi, Beelzebub, Toriko, and More to Pen One Shots for Weekly Shonen Jump

The first 2018 issue of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine has announced that, to commemorate the magazine’s 50th anniversary in 2018, the magazine will publish new one shot manga by well-known manga creators.

The issue revealed that the following creators will publish one shots in 2018 issues:

  • NisiOisin and Mizuki Kawashita, one shot in the combined second and third issue on December 11, 2017. The “mysterious story” is titled “Part Threes.”
  • Naoshi Komi, one shot in the sixth issue on January 4, 2018
  • Tite Kubo
  • Kyosuke Usuta
  • Mitsutoshi Shimabukuro
  • RyĆ«hei Tamura
  • Hiroshi Shiibashi

The magazine teased that it will also feature one shots by other famed manga creators.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume 11

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Nisekoi: False Love Volume 11 features Raku Ichijo, a high school boy who pretends to date Chitoge Kirisaki in order to keep the peace between their yakuza families. During the series, Raku attracts other girls’ attention, which only complicates his situation. And if that isn’t enough, Raku is also trying to find a girl he made a promise with 10 years ago that included giving her a key that would open a locket that he wears.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume 11
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: September 1, 2015

Volume 11 opens with Raku still having amnesia after being hit by a ball at the end of Volume 10. As Raku and his friends meet at Onodera’s house to try to help him jog his memory, Marika finds an old picture book. Surprisingly, this particular book starts to jog Raku’s memory a little, and the story and pictures seem to fit in with the locket, key, and promise aspect of the overarching story. Just as it appears this might actually provide a clue to solve the mystery of the girl Raku made the promise with, it’s discovered that the final pages of the book are missing. While finding this book was a good thing due to helping Raku with his amnesia to some extent and for starting to provide some kind of a clue for the overarching story, it’s a little frustrating that this ends up being a loose end. I expect this picture book will become important at some point later in the story.

But during the amnesia storyline, Chitoge finds herself feeling awkward. Since Raku doesn’t remember anything, he believes that Chitoge is really his girlfriend because he was told that this was a fact. It seems like Chitoge is starting to fall for Raku for real, but she keeps trying to deny this to herself. But she feels bad about the situation Raku is in, and she decides she can’t continue the charade of being his real girlfriend. And it’s Chitoge who turns out to be the catalyst for Raku getting his memory back due to a humorous misunderstanding. While I have to admit that the amnesia storyline was kind of interesting, I’m glad Komi didn’t try to stretch it out any farther. If he had, I think this storyline would have found itself resorting to overused gags.

Next, there’s a one chapter story focusing on Onodera thinking she’s gained weight and deciding not to eat in order to try to lose weight. Raku notices that something’s wrong, and he’s ultimately the one who’s able to steer her on the right path. Personally, I didn’t care much for this story, since the humor was being derived from someone thinking they have a weight problem and need to go on a crash diet.

This is followed by another story about Onodera, this time about Raku wanting to celebrate her birthday but not knowing what to get her. Raku asks for help from her sister Haru, who only does so reluctantly since she’s still not a fan of his at this point in the story. While the interactions are awkward, it’s revealed that Raku had helped Haru in the past but she didn’t know it. By the end of this chapter, Haru may still not like Raku, but she doesn’t seem to be quite so antagonistic toward him. While it may not have been much progression for Haru’s attitude toward Raku, this small step is better than nothing.

Marika receives an unexpected visit from her friend, Mikage. She’s come to check up on Marika and to meet Raku. She gives them a hard time, and says she won’t leave until the two of them kiss. This leads to Mikage helping them cut school to go to an amusement park. But among the hijinks and comedy, a discussion that Mikage has with Marika seems to be dropping a hint that Marika is hiding something important from Raku and the others. After reading this story, I found Mikage to be rather annoying. In fact, I think I’d even go so far as to say that I find her to be even more annoying than Marika.

The final chapter of Nisekoi: False Love Volume 11 was my favorite. It’s a flashback of Onodera and Raku in junior high, with Onodera narrating how she met him and fell for him. It’s also a sweet story that shows that the two of them almost ended up at different high schools. I thought this was some wonderful background information and character development to include for the series.

Outside of Onodera’s crash diet storyline, the rest of the volume seems to include important information, character progression, and plot progression for the overarching story. While Volume 10 may have had more of an emotional punch, Volume 11 did more to progress the story.

Fans of the series will be happy to receive another piece of the puzzle for the locket, key, and promise story. They will also want to read Nisekoi: False Love Volume 11 to see Onodera’s flashback. It’s really worth the wait, since the flashback appears in the final chapter in the volume.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume 10

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Nisekoi: False Love Volume 10 focuses on a high school boy named Raku Ichijo and the complications that arise with his pretend girlfriend, Chitoge Kirisaki. They’re forced into this relationship by their fathers in order to keep the peace between their rival yakuza gangs. But over time, Raku begins attracting other girls, which only complicates his already strange situation.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume 10
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: July 7, 2015

Volume 10 starts out with a couple of stories that are light-hearted in nature. The first one sees Raku going to a bath house because the plumbing is shot at his house. By coincidence, three of the girls from his harem also show up at that exact same bath house. The owner puts Raku in charge when she has to step out for a little while, which leads to hijinks that involve the girls. This is one of those stories in the Nisekoi: False Love series that exists simply to cause problems for Raku and doesn’t accomplish anything in the way of character or plot development. Unfortunately, I tend to not enjoy these particular stories in the series, because all they ever include is Raku ending up in strange or embarrassing situations with some of the girls in the harem. When you’ve seen one story like this, you’ve basically seen them all. Only the location and the types of situations Raku finds himself in are different.

The second story sees Raku’s homeroom teacher, Ms. Kyoko, rope him into pool cleaning duty at school. He rounds up his friends and they work together to get the job done. They’re allowed to use the pool afterward, and the reader gets to see the characters enjoying themselves. While this was a light-hearted story, it also did provide a little bit of character development for Paula. Up to this point, Paula hasn’t been very social with her peers, and both Raku and Haru encourage her to take a chance and try to have fun with the others. It also appears that Haru is trying hard to become friends with Paula, so this could be a plot point that continues as the series progresses.

The next three chapters encompass the most serious story in Volume 10. Of the stories that appear in this volume, this one is my favorite. First, it starts out with Raku learning that Shu has a crush on a girl and trying to figure out who the girl is. At the same time, it’s revealed that their homeroom teacher, Ms. Kyoko, is getting married and leaving the school. It turns out that these two stories are related to one another, and I appreciated how this story arc shows that Shu is more than the one-dimensional goofball that he’s appeared to be up to this point in the series. To me, Nisekoi: False Love is at its best when it either focuses on the overarching storyline of the promise and the locket or on development that takes a character to another level. It’s just too bad the series places more emphasis on the light-hearted stories and the hijinks.

The next story sees Ruri informing Raku that Onodera is sick and needs someone to look after her. When Raku gets to Onodera’s house, he finds that Haru is also there. This story ultimately has Haru learning that Raku isn’t the bad guy that she thought he was, and Raku gets the locket back that Haru took into her possession in Volume Nine. So this chapter ended up providing important character development for Haru and the relationship she has with Raku, as well as providing the potential for the overarching storyline of the promise and the locket to start moving forward.

The final three chapters in the volume see Chitoge becoming angry with Raku when he forgets her birthday is coming up, but Raku gets beaned in the head by a baseball and develops temporary amnesia. Unfortunately, the amnesia storyline isn’t resolved by the end of this volume. Personally, I’m not that impressed with this storyline, but something very important is discovered by one of the characters right at the end of the volume. I think the item that’s discovered is the only reason why this amnesia storyline exists.

I have to say that this is one of the better volumes that I’ve read for Nisekoi: False Love in a while. While I may not personally be a fan of this series, I only found a small amount of things to complain about this time. And if I was able to enjoy Nisekoi: False Love Volume 10 this much, I anticipate that fans of the series will have a strong appreciation for the storylines and the development that takes place for some of the characters.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Nisekoi: False Love Manga Takes One Week Break Due to Author’s Sudden Illness

A notice from the editorial department that Shueisha will publish in the 33rd issue of Weekly Shonen Jump reveals that Naoshi Komi’s Nisekoi: False Love manga will not appear in the issue due to the author’s sudden illness. The editorial department apologized to readers who were looking forward to reading the new chapter.

The editorial department also noted that the postcard included with the magazine for the weekly survey still lists Nisekoi: False Love as being published in the issue because, but due to the publishing schedule, the staff couldn’t remove the listing in time. The staff apologized for the error.

The notice states that Nisekoi: False Love will return in the 34th issue on July 18, 2015.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume Nine

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Nine focuses on Raku Ichijo and the complications he has from pretending to date Chitoge Kirisaki. Their fathers are the heads of rival yakuza gangs, and they hope by having their children pretend to date that it will keep the peace between their groups.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Nine
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: May 5, 2015

Volume Nine starts out with two chapters focusing on a big running event at Raku’s school. With all of the grumbling going on in the classroom, the teacher decides to sweeten the deal for the boys’ race by saying that the winner gets to kiss the girl of his choice. Of course, this fires the boys up, and Raku decides he has to win the race so no other guy could potentially kiss his crush, Onodera. The other boys gang up on Raku during the race, and this leads to quite a few hijinks. When I read this chapter and saw what the teacher did to encourage the boys to participate, I couldn’t believe that she had done that. Fortunately, there’s a twist at the end of the storyline that I hadn’t predicted, so it ended up not causing any real issues for anyone once the race was finished.

It’s now spring break, and Chitoge and Raku have one of their scheduled dates on April Fool’s Day. Chitoge has realized that Claude, who usually stalks the two of them on their dates, isn’t watching as much, so she and Raku don’t do romantic gestures like holding hands when they’re out. She decides to use April Fool’s Day to her advantage in order to force Raku to do some of those small gestures, but she gets more than she bargained for. The humor is derived from Raku going overboard, since Chitoge told a whopper of a lie to try to get what she wanted. But at least Chitoge learns a lesson once all was said and done.

A new school year begins, and Raku and his friends are now all second-year high school students. Onodera’s younger sister, Haru, is now a first-year at the school, and much of Volume Nine focuses on her interactions with Raku. When Haru is being accosted by some upperclassmen, Raku comes to her rescue. Unfortunately, she passes out so she doesn’t see her rescuer clearly. But she decides that her rescuer must be her “Prince Charming” and that she needs to find him. Haru has heard rumors about Raku, and when she officially meets him, Haru hates him. She also keeps insisting that Raku needs to stay away from her older sister.

With the hatred that Haru has for Raku, it’s not surprising that Komi kept trying to find ways for these two characters to have to interact with each other. But we see that the hate Haru has isn’t always a constant. At times when Raku tries to be friendly, Haru will sometimes start agreeing with him. When she realizes she’s doing this, though, she’ll become upset with herself and changes her tune. Haru also has Raku’s locket, because it had come off when he had taken her to the nurse’s office when he saved her. But poor Raku just can’t seem to convince Haru that it’s his. This element isn’t resolved by the end of Volume Nine, so I imagine that this will be a running thread for at least the next volume or two of the series.

The final story in Volume Nine sees Paula, another member of Chitoge’s father’s gang, trying to set Tsugumi up with Raku. Over the course of the final two chapters, Paula finds that the schemes she tries to pull backfire. Personally, this story and the two chapters about the race were my least favorite parts of this volume. When it comes to Nisekoi: False Love, I tend to like the stories that add a new element to the series or help aid in character development. The chapters that focus more on the hijinks than on advancing the characters tend to not do as much for me.

Even though I didn’t entirely enjoy Nisekoi: False Love Volume Nine, I think that long time readers and fans of the series will like getting to know Haru and seeing the various hijinks that Raku finds himself in due to all of his various potential love interests.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven focuses on Raku, the son of a yakuza boss. He made a promise 10 years earlier with a girl that they would get married someday. The girl gave him a locket, and she holds the key to open it. Raku hasn’t seen her in 10 years, and has no memory of who she is or what she looked like. He’s crushing on a girl named Kosaki Onodera, but he has to pretend to date Chitoge Kirisaki in order to keep the peace between their parents’ gangs. During the series, Raku acquires other love interests, who all just happened to make a promise with a boy 10 years earlier that included a locket and a key.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: January 6, 2015

Volume Seven introduces a new character named Paula. She’s a member of the Beehive, the gang that’s run by Chitoge’s father. Paula has come to settle a score with Tsugumi, and Raku finds himself being pulled right into the middle of Paula’s challenge. Not only is he brought into the middle of it, he becomes the goal: the winner of the challenge is the one who can steal a kiss from Raku first. Of course, this leads to hijinks as Raku tries to run away from the two of them as they’re shooting guns at each other and chasing him. For the most part, this particular story didn’t do much for me, but I have to give Tsugumi some credit for how she creatively wins the challenge.

Next is a story where the characters’ class grade point rankings are posted. Chitoge comes in fifth for their class, whereas Marika is near the bottom. Marika wants Raku to tutor her as a way to get him alone, but since Raku isn’t even in the Top 50 in the rankings, Chitoge decides to go along and help. This is yet another story where Marika plots to get “dearest Raku” alone, so that’s already a black mark against it for me. When you add in the fact that I really don’t care for Marika as a character, it made this chapter my least favorite one to appear in Volume Seven.

The next story sees Chitoge using lip gloss and Raku not noticing. She becomes frustrated and starts changing more noticeable things about her, and Raku still doesn’t seem to notice. It gets to the point that Chitoge becomes nearly obsessed with getting Raku to notice changes she makes. At the end of the chapter, Raku surprises Chitoge by what he says. While this was a decent story, it wasn’t the best one that appeared in Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven.

This is followed by a story that focuses on Ruri, which is rather uncommon in this series. Ruri loses her glasses, and Raku and Onodera try to help her find them. Ruri tries to get Onodera and Raku alone as they search, but her plan backfires. Shu ends up playing a role in this story as well. Having a story focusing on Ruri is a nice change of pace, especially since she’s one of the few females in this series that isn’t chasing after Raku.

Roughly the final third of Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven is set in the days leading up to Christmas. Chitoge’s mother, Hana, is coming to Japan for a visit, and Raku is asked to meet her. Chitoge’s mother is nothing like how I imagined her. Hana looks like she should be Chitoge’s older sister instead of her mother, and she doesn’t dress like I would expect such a successful businesswoman would.

This is a rather touching story, since you have Chitoge believing that Hana doesn’t love her, and Hana thinking that Chitoge hates her. Hana brings in Raku to serve as her secretary for a few days, and Raku does what he can to try and bring mother and daughter together. I liked seeing all the lengths Raku went to on Christmas Eve to try to get Chitoge to Hana before she has to leave. This, by far, was the best story to appear in Volume Seven. Not only did it provide some more backstory and development for Chitoge, it also genuinely tugged at the reader’s heartstrings. Not many stories in Nisekoi: False Love manage to accomplish this.

While Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven isn’t quite as strong as Volume Six, at least we get the storyline about Chitoge and her mother. It doesn’t quite make up for the Marika story being included, but it comes close.

While I’m personally not much of a fan of Nisekoi: False Love, I expect that readers who have been following and enjoying this series will appreciate Nisekoi: False Love Volume Seven much more than I did.

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Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume Eight

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Eight focuses on Raku, the son of a yakuza boss who made a promise 10 years earlier with a girl that they would get married someday. The girl gave him a locket, and she holds the key to open it. Raku hasn’t seen her since, and has no memory of her name or what she looked like. He has a crush on a girl named Kosaki Onodera, but he has to pretend to date Chitoge Kirisaki in order to keep the peace between his father’s gang and Chitoge’s father’s gang. During the series, Raku acquires other love interests, who all just happened to make a promise with a boy 10 years earlier that included a locket and a key.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Eight
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: March 3, 2015

Volume Eight starts out with Raku and his friends helping at a local shrine on New Year’s Eve. The priestess discovers there’s a demon haunting Raku that needs to be exorcised before the end of the year. If the demon isn’t exorcised, Raku’s life could be in danger. The chapter focuses on the hijinks and competition the girls in Raku’s harem experience as they try to be the one to exorcise the demon from him. This chapter would have been more amusing if I hadn’t already seen several stories in this series with a similar setup.

On New Year’s Day, Raku’s friends drop by his place to have lunch. Raku finds some candy that he offers to his guests, but he neglects to look at the wrapper to see that they’re whiskey bonbons. Raku’s love interests get drunk on the candy and act differently, making Raku uncomfortable. Komi tries to make it look like Raku had a dream, but the very last panel seems to show that Raku’s friends are hiding the truth from him. This story didn’t feel realistic, because I don’t think it’s possible for the girls to get this drunk off of eating candy with some alcohol mixed in.

Raku and his friends return to school after winter vacation, and their teacher decides it’s time to change seats. The entire chapter focuses on the members of Raku’s harem not being happy with their new seating arrangement, so the class is forced to go through the seat assignment process several times. The first couple of seat changes were kind of entertaining, but after that the gag lost all its humor.

The next two chapters focus on Valentine’s Day, and Raku’s love interests try making chocolate and give it to him. For Onodera and Chitoge, their biggest challenge is simply getting the chocolate made, since neither of them is good at cooking. While they succeed at that step, they still have to get up the courage to actually give it to him. Marika adds to the hijinks when she chases after Raku with her gift. The Valentine’s Day chocolate story is pretty standard, but in Nisekoi: False Love Volume Eight, the absurdity level is increased with this storyline. Of the various stories that appear in this volume, I would have to say that the Valentine’s Day one is probably the best.

Tsugumi is given experimental explosive handcuffs by Claude. Even though the Beehive intends to get rid of them, he suggests that she might have a use for them. For whatever reason, Tsugumi takes the handcuffs to school, but then decides she wants to get rid of them. Tsugumi accidentally bumps into Raku and somehow the handcuffs snap shut and trap the two of them. I had a hard time with this story, because the setup just felt forced. I also know that a similar setup to this is recycled in a later chapter of the series. As I read Nisekoi: False Love, I’ve picked up on the fact that Komi has a tendency to recycle story setups and gags on a somewhat regular basis.

The final chapter sees Raku and Chitoge going to a diner and discovering that Marika is working there. After they get there, members of both Raku’s father’s yakuza and Chitoge’s father’s yakuza arrive at the diner. Both groups are itching to have a fight, and things only get worse when the police arrive. The humor in this chapter is supposed to derive for Marika’s issues doing her job and from the gathering of the yakuza and the police. I didn’t care much for this chapter, because I’m not a fan of Marika. She’s my least favorite character in the series, because I can’t stand how manipulative she is.

With Nisekoi: False Love, it’s easy to see that Komi blatantly borrows concepts from other manga. For example, the promise with a girl years earlier that Raku doesn’t remember comes straight out of Love Hina. The relationship set up between two fathers, and the fact that the girl Raku’s set up with can’t cook, come straight out of Ranma 1/2.

Nisekoi: False Love isn’t necessarily a bad series, but it feels derivative to me since I’m familiar with other series with similar concepts. If I didn’t have knowledge of these other series, I might be able to enjoy it more. And the fact that Komi recycles story setups and gags from his own series doesn’t help matters. Readers who may not be familiar with series like Love Hina or Ranma 1/2 might be able to enjoy Nisekoi: False Love more than I do.

I may not have enjoyed Nisekoi: False Love Volume Eight very much, but I think readers who actively read and follow the series will like the hijinks and interactions that Raku goes through. The volume also contains the stories and humor that fans of Nisekoi: False Love have come to expect from this series.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Nisekoi: False Love Volume Six

Raku Ichijo, a high school boy from a yakuza family, made a promise 10 years earlier with a girl he knew then that they would get married someday. He has a locket that the girl gave him, and she has the key that will open the locket. Unfortunately, he hasn’t seen this girl since, and he has no memory of her name or what she looked like. He has a crush on a girl named Kosaki Onodera, but he has to pretend to date Chitoge Kirisaki in order to keep the peace between his father’s yakuza gang and Chitoge’s father’s gang. As the series has progressed up to this point, Raku has also acquired two more potential love interests: Marika Tachibana and Seishiro Tsugumi.

Nisekoi: False Love Volume Six
Written by: Naoshi Komi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: November 4, 2014

Volume Six picks up where Volume Five left off, with Raku and his friends off on summer vacation and spending time at the beach. Chitoge overhears Onodera asking Raku if he’d kiss her, and this bothers Chitoge. One night, Chitoge asks Raku if he thought it would work if they were really going out, and after some hesitation says it wouldn’t. This angers Chitoge, and she doesn’t speak to him for the rest of summer vacation. But during summer vacation, Raku finds himself thinking of Chitoge and berates himself for it because he’s in love with Onodera.

When they return to school after break, we find that Chitoge still doesn’t want to be around Raku. Chitoge’s question at the beach ends up playing an important role in the story that begins when they return to school. I have to say that Komi did a fantastic job of running this thread throughout most of the story in Volume Six, and that it helped to make this particular volume feel the most cohesive of the six that I’ve read up to this point.

The school festival is coming up, and Raku’s class decides to put on a play of Romeo and Juliet. Raku is cast as Romeo, and Chitoge is supposed to be Juliet, but she declines. Onodera ends up with the role, and Marika insists on being her understudy. The buildup to the play, as well as the play itself, ends up taking up most of the Volume Six. On the day of the performance, Onodera sprains her ankle and Marika is sick, so Raku has to convince Chitoge to fill in as Juliet at the last minute. The play ends up not going as originally written, thanks to hijinks and interruptions by various members of the cast. However, the end result is actually rather amusing and goes over really well with the audience watching it.

Romeo and Juliet is a popular play to see in manga, especially with the production turning into a comedy. Other series, such as Ranma 1/2 have done this trick, but I thought it worked well for Nisekoi: False Love. There’s a lot of parallels between the story of Romeo and Juliet and the situation that Raku and Chitoge find themselves in, so they’re able to pull off their roles in the play rather convincingly.

Chitoge is a major focus of Volume Six, with a thread running through most of it over her confusion about her feelings for Raku. But in the story immediately following the play, she finally admits to herself that she’s really in love with him. This realization is a big step forward for her, and it adds another layer to her character. This particular chapter also sees Raku getting his pendant back, but they can’t test the keys due to the fact that there’s something stuck deep inside the lock that keeps it from being opened. In order to get it out, the pendant would have to be destroyed. Well, this answers a question I had while reading the recent chapters in Weekly Shonen Jump as to why they simply haven’t tried unlocking the locket with the various keys. Now I can be a little less critical on this point going forward with the most recent chapters!

Overall, the final two chapters, which are stand-alone stories, aren’t quite as strong as the end of the summer vacation story and the story about the play. They brought down what was otherwise a rather strong volume up to that point.

I have to say that so far, this is the strongest volume of Nisekoi: False Love that I’ve read. Unfortunately, I already know from reading the most recent chapters that the quality that I saw in this volume doesn’t continue for the long term. But when Komi puts his mind to it, he can produce a story that’s compelling even though many of the elements of the series feel derivative.

I’m still going on with Nisekoi: False Love in order to continue filling in the gaps that I have from jumping into the series a few months back, but at least Volume Six was an enjoyable enough read. After reading this volume, I believe that if you’re a fan of Nisekoi: False Love and have enjoyed the previous five volumes, then you’ll definitely enjoy reading Volume Six.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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