Nagi no Asukara Is Now Streaming on Netflix

The Fandom Post is reporting that Netflix debuted the Nagi no Asukara anime under its localized name, A Lull in the Sea, on August 1, 2020. The series is in its original Japanese language and there is an English dub for it but it only has English subtitles.

NIS America released the series as a premium Blu-ray box set. Prior to this, the series was simulcast on Crunchyroll.

Source: The Fandom Post

English Cast for A Lull in the Sea

NIS America has announced the English cast for A Lull in the Sea (Nagi no Asukara):

  • Max Mittelman is Hikari Sakishima
  • Michelle Ruff is Manaka Mukaido
  • Bryce Papenbrook is Kaname Isaki
  • Brianna Knickerbocker is Chisaki Hiradaira
  • Chris Hackney is Tsumugu Kihara
  • Xanthe Huynh is Miuna Shiodome
  • Sarah Anne Williams is Sayu Hisanuma

NIS America will be bringing out the full 26 episode series on June 30, 2015 priced at US$179.99. The release will be Blu-ray only and will have the series dubbed in English as well as the original Japanese across three discs. On disc extras include the clean openings and closings as well as the original trailers. The box set premium edition includes two soundtracks (31 songs and 29 songs respectively) as well as a 76 page hardcover book.

Source: The Fandom Post

Nagi no Asukara to Receive an English Version

NIS America has announced that the home video releases for A Lull in the Sea (Nagi no Asukara) will have both the Japanese and English audio.

NIS America will release the 26-episode series as a Blu-ray premium edition on June 30, 2015 for US$179.99. The set will include a two-disk soundtrack, a 76-page art book, trailers, and clean openings and closings.

The series premiered in Japan on October 3, 2013. Crunchyroll simulcast the series as it aired, and Hulu is also streaming the anime.

Source: ANN

2014 In Review: Winter 2014 Season

Over the next few days, I’ll be publishing posts looking back at 2014. This first post takes a look back at the shows that I started watching during the Winter 2014 season. This post will also include series that I started watching in the Fall 2013 season that were still running with Winter 2014 started.

Log Horizon: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. This was a series that I admit to not being sure about when it first started in October 2013, but fortunately, I stuck with it and was rewarded with a series that made itself stand out from other anime series about characters who get stuck in a video game. I fell in love with this series by the time it finished airing in March 2014, and was overjoyed when the end of the final episode announced that there would be a second season that would begin airing in Fall 2014. I spent a lot of the year eagerly anticipating the second season because the first season had built such a strong foundation for the characters and their story.

Noragami: Noragami ended up being a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed the first four episodes, but then with Episode Five, I started feeling like the series wasn’t as strong as it was when it first started. My opinion improved a bit with Episode Six, and it kept improving through Episode 11. However, I was never entirely sure how I felt about Episode 12, because I couldn’t tell if it was meant to be a series finale or a season finale. As of this writing, there has been no word about a second season for Noragami, so I have to believe this was meant as a series finale. Unfortunately, there were enough loose ends that were left hanging which made it an unsatisfying note to end a series on. The manga for Noragami started being published during 2014, so I may need to start reading it at some point  and see if it might improve my opinion of the series.

Tokyo Ravens: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. When I first watched this series, I thought it had a slow start; however, enough elements were established in the first episode to interest me enough to come back to see more. With the second episode, I felt it was a little heavy on the “info dumping” side, but I was still willing to come back because the story that was developing showed a lot of promise. By the time I hit episode five, I found myself genuinely interested in Tokyo Ravens and decided that I’d see it through until the end. I ended up being interested in Tokyo Ravens for most of its 24 episode run; unfortunately, I started becoming a little disappointed in the series after a particular plot twist in Episode 23. I also ended up feeling rather let down and disappointed with how the final episode ended. FUNimation Entertainment, who had streamed the series as a simulcast, has recently announced that it has acquired the home video rights for Tokyo Ravens; unfortunately, I have no plans to purchase their release to add it to my anime home video library because of my disappointment with the final two episodes of the series.

D-Frag!: This is an anime I watched because the previews made it look like it’d be really hilarious. While there was humor in the first episode, there wasn’t as much as I had expected. And from humor I did see in the episode, I saw the potential for the series to rely on the same gags every week; unfortunately, I ended up being right with that assumption. And the gags that the series relied so heavily upon weren’t terribly funny the first time they showed up, and they wore out their welcome rather quickly. With episode two, I saw that maybe D-Frag! had potential with its story, but sadly, that potential never materialized. It also didn’t help that the series already started feeling stagnant by Episode Four. When I reached the halfway point, I decided I’d stick it out, but that the second half of the series really couldn’t go fast enough for my taste. The final episode didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress had been made on the loose threads that were out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes earlier. And the final episode was the worst of the drudgery that I saw for that show. After that episode ended, all I could think was, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!”

Yowamushi Pedal: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. After watching the first episode, I thought I could see some potential in the series. Even though I’m not a fan of cycling, I found myself getting hooked on Yowamushi Pedal the more I watched of it. I especially found myself being riveted to the action that takes place during the racing scenes. I also liked how the characters developed over the course of the series. The main focus of the first half was on developing the members of the Sohoku team, with occasional development on members of the other two teams. However, the development for the other two teams tended to take place during the Inter-High race. The main selling point of this series to me ended up being the characters and the development they go through. While the pacing of Yowamushi Pedal was pretty typical for a shonen sports anime, it’s something I got used to with each race that appeared in the series. I was happy to hear that there would be a second season for the series in Fall 2014, especially since this season ended before the winner of the second day of the Inter-High was determined.

Hamatora: After watching the first episode of Hamatora, I felt that the series showed a bit of promise; however, I was little turned off by the character of Hajime, because it appeared her gluttony was going to be a major source of humor for the series. It turns out we learn later on why Hajime is such a glutton, and it also turned out that there was more in the way of humor than just Hajime’s gluttony. It was ultimately the second episode that sold me on Hamatora. I enjoyed seeing the various mysteries that came Hamatora’s way, and how several of the episodes were able to take what appeared to be two unrelated plots and find a way to weave the two together rather successfully by the end. Overall, I enjoyed the series except for Episode Five and Episode Eight. But when I saw that there was a cliffhanger ending and that there would be another season of Hamatora coming in the future, I was looking forward to seeing more episodes in order to find out how the story continued from the cliffhanger.

Nagi no Asukara: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that after watching the first episode, I had some mixed feelings. On the one hand, I kind of liked the story, although I was finding Hikari to be a bit on the annoying side. However, I was having problems with using my willing suspension of disbelief about people being able to live underwater; it turns out that the concept of Ena, which allows them to breathe underwater, hadn’t been properly introduced by the end of the first episode. I decided to continue watching the series, and went into the second episode using my willing suspension of disbelief and focusing on the storytelling. It’s a decision I’m glad I made, because I found myself being more impressed with the series and becoming genuinely interested in the characters and their stories. I’d become so riveted with the series that when the first half reached its climax with the Ofunehiki, I was a little frustrated that I had to wait two weeks in order to find out what happened. When the second half of the series started, I have to admit that it was a bit of an adjustment to get used to the fact that a five-year timeskip had happened between the two episodes and that some of the cast members were noticeably older. I appreciated how there was a focus on the confusion for both those who returned from the surface after a five-year hibernation and those who stayed on the surface and aged five years. There’s a lot of raw emotion that’s prevalent in the second half of the series, but I found these emotions and reactions to be believable. I have to admit that for the most part, I had basically predicted what directions the various relationships would go in. However, I still found the conclusion of the series to be satisfying and enjoyable.

Samurai Flamenco: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. At the end of the first episode, I thought that between the animation and the storytelling, there seemed to be enough there to keep my interest and make me want to come back week after week to watch more of Samurai Flamenco. I have to admit that when the King Torture arc was introduced and caused the major tonal shift for the series, I wasn’t entirely sure that I liked it. It didn’t help that it was also at that point that the animation quality went down noticeably, and that “off model” shots started becoming more prevalent and noticeable. By the end of the King Torture, arc, though, I had become so accustomed to the change in tone that I started enjoying the series a bit more again. Overall, though, I did enjoy Samurai Flamenco when all was said and done.

Magical Warfare: After watching the first episode, I thought the series had some potential. After the second episode, I thought it plodded a bit due all of the exposition included, but I still thought that the overall concept still showed promise. At the end of episode three, I said that while Magical Warfare wasn’t one of my favorite series of Winter 2014, I couldn’t say that it was the worst one I was watching, either. By the end of episode four, I was already at a point where I wasn’t looking forward to watching the series week after week. As the series continued to progress, I became frustrated with how the series was paced, the fact that the villains weren’t very well defined by the halfway point of the series, and how the character development wasn’t where it needed to be for me to truly care about these characters. The final episode was a major letdown, due to how little was explained for what was happening throughout it. The ending of the final episode was so vague that the viewer was left having to make a lot of assumptions just to figure out what the heck was going on. Honestly, the way Magical Warfare ended was just so vague and bizarre that it makes the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion seem like it makes sense. And considering the reputation the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion has, it’s really saying something. All in all, I have to say that Magical Warfare ended up being a steaming pile of poo and I think it was easily one of the worst series I watched during 2014.

Strike the Blood: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that I wasn’t entirely sure about Strike the Blood after watching the first episode, but I decided to give it a chance and continue watching it. After watching the second episode, though, I was more impressed with the series than I thought I’d be. The cliffhanger ending for episode three ultimately sold me on the series. As the series progressed through the various story arcs, more characters were introduced. Most of them seemed to have an importance to the series, although there were a couple of characters who were only truly important for one or two story arcs, and then basically all but vanished from the series. After making it through all 24 episodes of Strike the Blood, I have to say that overall, I was satisfied with how the series progressed and ultimately came to its conclusion. It was a series I came to look forward to watching.

Wizard Barristers: At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series. By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. The viewer was left with the responsibility of assuming what happens.

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha: I have to admit that at the end of the first episode, I wasn’t entirely sure if I was going to like Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha. However, I decided to keep watching to see if the story would improve. After finishing episode two, my opinion of the series started becoming more favorable. As the episodes went on, I continued to enjoy the series more and more; I’m so glad I didn’t let my initial unsure impression keep me away from this series. Overall, I thought the series was good, although the last couple of episodes felt a bit rushed compared to the other episodes; I have to say that Episode 10 had more issues with being rushed than Episode Nine did.  The action in the first half of Episode 10 felt stretched out, and then the story in the second half ended up feeling rushed. In the final episode, I appreciated the fact that it demonstrated just how much Inari has grown as a character over the course of the series. In a lot of ways, when Inari returned Uka’s divine power at the end of Episode 10, it symbolizes that Inari had grown up and no longer needs the “crutch” that she thought the power was giving her. In a lot of respects, though, there is some vagueness at the end of the final episode. Do Inari and Koji ever end up together? Is Touka still able to see Uka even though Inari no longer can? It appears that the manga series is still ongoing in Japan, so that might explain why the ending of the anime is a bit ambiguous.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

Anime Spotlight: Nagi no Asukara

Nagi no Asukara is an anime series produced by P.A. Works and is directed by Toshiya Shinohara. The series aired on Japanese television from October 3, 2013-April 3, 2014. As of this writing, NIS America holds the North American home video license for Nagi no Asukara.

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series focuses on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they must attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka meets Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village.

Even though the sea village may be sending its students to the surface, it doesn’t mean that the people of the sea and the surface necessarily get along. At first, Hikari adopts a rather negative attitude toward the kids from the surface, but as he gets to know them, he starts softening his attitude. Hikari’s older sister, Akari, has fallen in love with a man from the surface named Itaru who has a young daughter, and their father disapproves of the relationship. Miuna, the man’s daughter, doesn’t want Akari to be with her father at first.

While all this is going on, we see various love issues arrive. Hikari has a crush on Manaka, Manaka is torn between Hikari and Tsumugu, Chisaki has a crush on Hikari, Kaname has a crush on Chisaki, and Miuna’s friend Sayu develops a crush on Kaname.

Uroko-sama, a scale of the Sea God that looks over the sea village, warns of an impending disaster and that the people of the sea will need to hibernate. Hikari and his friends decide they’ll do everything they can to avoid the hibernation.

During the first half of the series, Hikari makes it his goal to coordinate a ceremony called the Ofunehiki. The fishermen on the surface are excited for the idea, but the people of the sea don’t want any part of it. In the end, the Ofunehiki is held as part of Akari and Itaru’s wedding. Tragedy strikes during the Ofunehiki, which ultimately causes Manaka, Hikari, and Kaname to end up in the sea and hibernating with the others.

Then there’s a five-year timeskip in the series. Chisaki, the only one of the kids from the sea village to remain on the surface, has aged five years and is now living with Tsumugu and his grandfather. Chisaki is studying nursing, and Tsumugu is off at college in the city to study oceanography. Miuna and Sayu are now middle school students and have the same teacher that Hikari and the others had five years earlier.

Hikari and Kaname awaken from their hibernation and reappear on the surface. Not only do they have to adjust to the fact that everyone around them has aged five years and they haven’t, but Chisaki and Tsumugu have their own feelings to wrestle with.

Later, Hikari and Kaname go to search for Manaka. Right around the same time, several surprising things take place and revelations are made. It all culminates into an emotional conclusion for the series.

I admit that after watching the first episode, I had some mixed feelings. On the one hand, I kind of liked the story, although I was finding Hikari to be a bit on the annoying side. However, I was having problems with using my willing suspension of disbelief about people being able to live underwater. It turns out that the concept of Ena, which allows them to breathe underwater, hadn’t been properly introduced by the end of the first episode.

I decided to continue watching the series and went into the second episode using my willing suspension of disbelief and focusing on the storytelling. It’s a decision I’m glad I made, because I found myself being more impressed with the series and becoming genuinely interested in the characters and their stories.

I’d become so riveted with the series that when the first half reached its climax with the Ofunehiki, I was a little frustrated that I had to wait two weeks in order to find out what happened. When the second half of the series started, it was a bit of an adjustment to get used to the fact that a five-year timeskip had happened between the two episodes and that some of the cast members were noticeably older.

I appreciated how there was a focus on the confusion for both those who returned from the surface after a five-year hibernation and those who stayed on the surface and aged five years. There’s a lot of raw emotion that’s prevalent in the second half of the series, but I found these emotions and reactions to be believable.

For the most part, I had basically predicted what directions the various relationships would go in. However, I still found the conclusion of the series to be satisfying and enjoyable.

Nagi no Asukara was quite a ride over its 26-episode run, and it’s a series I’d like to rewatch again at some point.

Since NIS America has acquired the home video rights for Nagi no Asukara, this means that we should be able to expect some kind of home video release in the future. I’m very curious to see what kind of release NIS America ultimately gives to this series.

Additional Anime Spotlights:

Nagi no Asukara: Episode 26 – “The Color Of The Sea. The Color Of The Land. The Color Of The Wind. The Color Of The Heart. Your Color. ~Earth Color of a Calm~”

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series started out by focusing on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they had attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka met Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village. At the beginning of episode 14, five years have passed and a lot of things have changed.

This episode sees Chisaki bringing Manaka back up to the surface. Kaname and Chisaki discover that Manaka now has her Ena back.

Meanwhile, Miuna has been taken by the Sea God and placed where Manaka had been in the Ojoshi-sama graveyard. Hikari tries to free Miuna but he keeps being repelled by the covering that surrounds her. After thinking about Miuna’s feelings for him, Hikari starts crying and telling the Sea God to take his ability to fall in love with someone. We hear Miuna’s thoughts, and apparently, so does the Sea God.

Uroko-sama has brought the sacred fire to the sea village, because the Sea God wanted him to. The sacred fire suddenly grows bigger and begins going all over the sea. When it reaches the Ojoshi-sama graveyard and begins burning the wooden Ojoshi-samas. During this scene, the Sea God finally understands Ojoshi-sama’s true feelings from what was left of them in the sea. As the Sea God comes to this realization, Hikari manages to free Miuna.

After this, we see Hikari’s father approach the graveyard, and then Hikari, Miuna, Tsumugu and those in the sea village who have awakened go up to the surface. The rest of the episode shows what has happened to not only the characters, but to the surface and the sea village as well.

First off, I do have to say: Is it just me, or was the title of this episode a major mouthful?

Overall, I have to say that this was a satisfying ending for the series. Admittedly, while there are hints about the various couples that could form by the end of the series, none of them were truly established at the end; you have to assume that they’ll officially become couples after the point where the series ended. While we may not have necessarily seen these couples become definitive, I still found the ending to be enjoyable. And I have to say that for the most part, the series pretty much ended as I expected it to; however, there were still several moments of “feels” in the episode.

Nagi no Asukara ended up being quite a ride, and it’s a show I really looked forward to watching every Thursday. With both this and Samurai Flamenco ending this season, my Thursdays are going to very different going into the Spring 2014 season. I’m really going to miss Nagi no Asukara.

Since NIS America has acquired the home video rights for Nagi no Asukara, this means that we should be able to expect some kind of home video release in the future. I’m very curious to see what kind of release NIS America ultimately gives to this series.

Additional posts about Nagi no Asukara:

Nagi no Asukara: Episode 25 – “Love is Like the Sea”

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series started out by focusing on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they had attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka met Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village. At the beginning of episode 14, five years have passed and a lot of things have changed.

At the beginning of the episode, the final preparations are being made for the Ofunehiki. Akira goes over to see the Ojoshi-sama when Miuna, Tsumugu, Kaname, and Sayu are working on it. Miuna holds Akira up to see it up close, and he notices Manaka’s pendant. When Miuna tells Akira that the pendant is filled with Manaka’s love, he suddenly snatches the pendant and runs off. Akira trips, and the pendant falls into the water. Miuna and Tsumugu jump in after it. When Miuna finds it and grabs it, she hears Manaka’s voice saying, “I love Hii-kun.” Tsumugu comes over and says that he knew it.

Tsumugu has a flashback of a scene we had seen earlier in the series, except the scene goes beyond where it ended originally. It turns out that during that conversation, she admitted to Tsumugu that she was in love with Hikari, but was concerned because she knew that Chisaki liked him, too.

Kaname has an important talk with Tsumugu about Chisaki, and then Tsumugu sees Chisaki that night. He tells her that Kaname told him about Chisaki’s feelings for Tsumugu, and he also tells her about Manaka being in love with Hikari. After some back and forth, Tsumugu asks if he can hold her. When she doesn’t say anything, he tentatively puts his arms around her. While he embraces her, Chisaki feels guilty because she feels happy and her friends don’t.

Also that night, Manaka starts hearing the sea loudly again when she thinks about love. Manaka covers her ears, and then Miuna puts her hands over Manaka’s hands; when she does, the sound stops. Later, Miuna gets up in the middle of the night and sees Hikari going out. Miuna follows him, and when she catches up, she asks him if he loves Manaka. After a slight hesitation, he says he does. Miuna pushes him to say that he loves Manaka more. After some fighting, he declares it several more times. Miuna starts crying and says she’s going home. She thinks that the love she feels for Hikari hurts, and that she needs them to hurt more and more so she can push them to the breaking point and throw them away.

The Ofunehiki takes place the next day, and all of the main characters are involved in the ceremony. After the Ojoshi-sama is sent into the sea, the same phenomenon that happened during the first Ofunehiki happens again. A large wave comes and knocks Manaka off of the boat she’s on, and the characters who have Ena jump in to try to save her. The ending of the episode is both climactic and a little surprising.

The various relationship threads seem to be headed in the directions that I thought they would. It looks like Chisaki and Tsumugu will end up together, there’s a chance for Sayu and Kaname, and it turns out that Manaka and Hikari are interested in each other. I can’t really comment on Miuna, because a surprising event involves her at the end of this episode. If you ‘ve noticed a particular image in the most recent version of the opening, you might be able to have some kind of idea as to what happened to Miuna at the end of the episode.

I’m really looking forward to seeing Episode 26 of Nagi no Asukara. I hope that everything will turn out as best as they can under the circumstances presented at the end of Episode 25.

Additional posts about Nagi no Asukara:

Nagi no Asukara: Episode 24 – “Detritus”

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series started out by focusing on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they had attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka met Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village. At the beginning of episode 14, five years have passed and a lot of things have changed.

At the beginning of episode 24, Tsumugu talks to Chisaki and says he feels that her feelings are for him now. Tsumugu grabs Chisaki in a hug, but she pushes him away and says she doesn’t love him. Later, when Chisaki returns home, she has various flashbacks of times she and Tsumugu spent together over the past five years. She seems to realize that she’s developed feelings for him. Kaname comes up at that moment, and he admits that he knows she’ll never love him back, and he also tells her that she needs to be honest about her feelings for Tsumugu.

Meanwhile, Akira gives Manaka a letter he wrote in kindergarten, which reads, “I Love Manaka.” Manaka doesn’t know how to react and runs off to her own room. She starts crying, because she has no idea what it means. At the same time, she can also hear the sea rather loudly.

Tsumugu runs into the younger cast members as they’re walking home from school, and he asks to talk to Kaname and Hikari “man-to-man.” The three of them go to see Uroko-sama. Tsumugu comes up with the idea of having another Ofunehiki and putting the pendant that Manaka is wearing around a wooden Ojoshi-sama’s neck to try to make the Sea God believe that Manaka has returned. Uroko-sama surprises them by saying that he’ll give a hand.

As the preparations get going for the Ofunehiki, Kaname overhears Chisaki and Tsumugu having a conversation while Sayu watches Kaname. Kaname heads out for a walk. Sayu comes up to him and tells him that she knows about his feelings for Chisaki. Kaname says he realizes that he’s been an outsider and that Chisaki’s eyes have always been looking elsewhere. Sayu tells him that he’s acting like Chisaki, and says how she’s been watching him and had him in her heart during the five years he was in hibernation. Kaname begins crying and is honest about his feelings: when he returned to the surface, he felt lonely because he thought no one had been waiting for him. At the end of this conversation, Kaname says he’ll start looking at Sayu as a girl his age instead of as a little girl. While this may not have quite been what Sayu had been hoping for, it’s really the best she can get at this point. But perhaps he’ll have feelings for Sayu that blossom over time.

There ended up being quite a focus placed on Kaname in this episode. I was glad to see him finally be honest about how he’s been feeling. I’d had a nagging feeling that he wasn’t entirely being honest with everyone and was wearing a false smile to hide the truth. I was also glad to see him come to the realization that he doesn’t stand a chance when it comes to Chisaki and is starting to open up to the idea of moving on.

Poor Manaka is starting to realize there’s something missing, in large part due to Akira’s letter. There’s a couple of scenes after this where she tries to talk to Hikari about who he loves, and both times, it becomes a rather awkward conversation. Hikari finds ways to give her some generalities about love and then change the subject.

The upcoming Ofunehiki sees characters returning who haven’t been seen in a while. The most notable is their classmate, Egawa, who comes with his pregnant wife. Several of their other former classmates also return to help get ready for the Ofunehiki.

With how much emphasis was being placed on the upcoming Ofunehiki near the end of episode 24, I’m wondering if the actual Ofunehiki will take place in the next episode, or if it’ll happen in the final episode of the series. I’m really curious to see if Tsumugu’s plan with the Ofunehiki will work or not and what any repercussions will be whichever way it goes.

Additional posts about Nagi no Asukara:

Nagi no Asukara: Episode 23 – “Who Do These Feelings Belong To?”

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series started out by focusing on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they had attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka met Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village. At the beginning of episode 14, five years have passed and a lot of things have changed.

A lot of this episode focuses on Hikari and his wish to find a way for Manaka to have the ability to love someone again. At one point, Hikari talks with everyone except Manaka, and they seem to be split into two factions. Hikari, Miuna, and Sayu believe that something needs to be done to help Manaka. Tsumugu, Kaname, and Chisaki believe there’s nothing they can really do. This causes Sayu to yell at Kaname, and she leaves in a huff. Miuna and Hikari go after her.

Later, when Manaka meets up with Hikari, Miuna, and Sayu, Manaka sees something shiny in the water. Manaka points it out, and Hikari goes after it. It’s a white rock spit up by a red-bellied sea slug. The white rock means the wish of the person who talked to it will come true. Manaka remembers talking to a red-bellied sea slug, but doesn’t remember what she said. Hikari believes this is Manaka’s rock, and he gives it to her and tells her to take care of it. Later, Miuna affixes it to a pendant so Manaka won’t lose it.

Hikari believes that Manaka was in love with Tsumugu before the Ofunehiki, so he goes to talk to Tsumugu. He believes that if Tsumugu stimulates Manaka’s feelings that her ability to love someone will return. Tsumugu refuses, saying there’s no proof that Manaka is in love with him and that people’s feelings shouldn’t be messed with. Hikari starts trying to fight Tsumugu, and Chisaki sees what’s going on. When Tsumugu tells Hikari that he won’t do it because he’s in love with Chisaki, she overhears him. Chisaki runs off and jumps into the sea, and Tsumugu jumps in after her. Something surprising happens while Tsumugu is in the water…

Emotions ride very high through episode 23. In addition, some movement is being made in regards to some of the potential relationships in the series. The most obvious is Chisaki learning about Tsumugu’s feelings for her and panicking. I have to admit that when Tsumugu made his declaration, I found myself thinking, “Finally!” OK, this wasn’t the best way to Chisaki to find out, but at least his feelings are out in the open now.

Also in this episode, Sayu declares to Miyu that she’s going to ask Kaname out; she says she doesn’t care how it turns out, as long as she can come to terms with it. With this declaration, I expect to see Sayu taking action on this declaration at some point within the next couple of episodes.

I was just so riveted as I watched this episode, and I was sad when it came to an end. And from what’s seen in the preview for episode 24, it looks emotions are going ride even higher than they did in this episode, so I’m really looking forward to seeing it in order to find out how this story will be progressing!

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Nagi no Asukara: Episode 22 – “Something Lost”

Nagi no Asukara is set in a world where long ago, human civilization lived on the ocean floor. However, there were humans who wanted to live above the surface and moved to land, and this created a separation between the humans. The series started out by focusing on four middle school students who live in the ocean named Hikari, Manaka, Chisaki, and Kaname. Because their middle school shut down, they had attend a school on land. During the first episode, Manaka met Tsumugu, one of their new classmates. He’s from a family of fishermen and has an interest in the underwater village. At the beginning of episode 14, five years have passed and a lot of things have changed.

Quite a bit of the episode focuses on Hikari and the others trying to locate Uroko-sama. During the course of their search, Hikari starts discovering that Manaka has lost bits and pieces of her memories from before she went into hibernation.

As time passes in the episode, the salt-flake snow begins falling more frequently, and it’ s also falling in towns and cities far from the sea as well. Because of the salt-flake snow, Mihashi has to go back to the university earlier than expected; however, Tsumugu decides to stay behind for now.

After Hikari realizes that Manaka has no memory of him confessing his feelings to her, he becomes upset and runs off. Miuna follows after him. As she follows him, the two discover a small shrine that they didn’t know existed; it turns out Uroko-sama is at the shrine. The remainder of the episode sees Uroko-sama finally filling in the information for both the characters and for the audience in regard to what’s happening with Manaka.

Finally we get some explanations as to what’s been going on up until this point. Unfortunately, getting the answers is rather bittersweet, because it’s rather heartbreaking for Hikari. It turns out that when Manaka was taken from the Ojoshi-sama graveyard, she lost more than just her Ena. I don’t want to say what that is in order to avoid providing a spoiler, but I’ll say that if you’ve been watching Manaka closely since she returned to the surface, there had been subtle hints dropped about it. Also, losing this also explains why she’s lost the particular memories that she has.

I would suspect that the remaining episodes of Nagi no Asukara will deal with Hikari dealing with the knowledge that he has acquired from talking with Uroko-sama. There’s also the various feelings that characters have for each other that will hopefully be resolved before the series comes to an end. With four episodes still remaining, the series should be able to wrap up most, if not all, of the loose threads that are still out there.

I’m looking forward to watching episode 22 in order to find out how Nagi no Asukara will continue to progress.

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