Double Decker! Doug & Kirill Anime to Get a Manga by Mizuki Sakakibara

It has been announced that the Double Decker! Doug & Kirill anime will get a manga adaptation that will run on both Shueisha’s Tonari no Young Jump website and the YanJan! app. The first chapter will debut at midnight on October 1, 2018. Mizuki Sakakibara is drawing the series.

Double Decker! Doug & Kirill is scheduled to premiere on Japanese television on September 30, 2018.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Eight

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Tiger & Bunny Volume 8 shows what happens to Wild Tiger and the other heroes as they try to stop Jake Martinez from taking over Stern Bild.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 8
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: November 10, 2015

Volume 8 has a strong emphasis on Wild Tiger and Barnaby as they try to extract information about Jake out of a NEXT that has sided with him but is now reconsidering his decision. But this leads to a confrontation with Jake, with Barnaby wanting revenge for the death of his parents. The fight between Jake and the two heroes shows a different side to Barnaby, and it gives Wild Tiger something to think about. During this section of the story, the reader also learns what happened to Rock Bison, since that had been left hanging at the end of Volume 7.

Meanwhile, Doc Saito figures out how to stop Kriem’s bears and exosuits, and the heroes who are available are sent out to plant jamming devices around Stern Bild. This part of the story leads to Blue Rose, Fire Emblem, and Dragon Kid being sent out to go after an armored vehicle which is believed to have a fleeing Jake Martinez in it. This pursuit of the armored vehicle, along with Wild Tiger and Barnaby’s fight with Jake, are the main times that action and superhero powers appear in this volume.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 8 continues to deviate from the anime series, and the most interesting deviation here is getting to see Jake Martinez have a flashback to his childhood. The flashback gave the reader insight into Jake as a character, and it helps to explain his motivations for what he’s been doing. I thought this was a nice touch, since the anime never addressed Jake’s backstory at all. When I watched the anime, I just had to assume that Jake was simply an evil person trying to antagonize Stern Bild for fun. The backstory presented for Jake in the manga almost makes him a sympathetic character.

The manga continues taking basic elements from the Tiger & Bunny anime but presents them in a different way. At first, I wasn’t entirely happy with the changes that were made, but at this point, I find I can better appreciate what the manga author is trying to do with the story. It may not be exactly the same as what was presented in the anime, but it’s still recognizable as Tiger & Bunny to readers who are already familiar with the series.

Even though the story may have evolved and changed from the anime, I appreciate that the art in Tiger & Bunny Volume 8 continues trying to remain as faithful as it can to the anime’s character designs. In some respects, it seems like there’s not quite as much detail being used in the art now compared to earlier volumes, but the change in quality doesn’t distract the reader too much from the story that they’re reading.

Readers who have read and enjoyed the previous volumes of the series should appreciate what they see in Tiger & Bunny Volume 8, especially the backstory that is provided for Jake Martinez.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Seven

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Tiger & Bunny Volume 7 continues the story of Jake Martinez’s attempt to take over Stern Bild and turn it into a nation of NEXT.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 7
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: July 14, 2015

Volume 7 seems to have a focus on the heroes having to make difficult choices. The best example of this takes place in Wild Tiger, Barnaby, and Rock Bison’s battle against Jake Martinez. Rock Bison, who is generally known for being more of an oaf in comparison to the other heroes, decides to take on Jake himself after both Wild Tiger and Barnaby’s powers have been depleted. On a tactical level, this was to give Wild Tiger and Barnaby a chance to escape. However, this was also an important choice for Rock Bison because of what it meant for character development. I was pleased to see Rock Bison do this, but at the end of the volume, I’m left wondering what exactly his fate is.

This volume also sees Origami Cyclone making the choice of believing in his old friend, Edward, who had been working under Jake Martinez. It was a big risk, but it showed that Origami Cyclone was actually willing to take a chance. Earlier in the series, he was the hero always trying not to do anything except get his face in front of the camera enough to get his sponsor some advertising. This storyline forced Origami Cyclone to act as a hero, which made for another great character development moment.

And speaking of character development, there was a great scene between Blue Rose and Dragon Kid in Volume 7 that really helped to show a dynamic between the two female members of the Hero TV heroes. This was something that really wasn’t touched on much in the original Tiger & Bunny anime series, so I give the author credit for touching on this aspect. Even Kriem, Martinez’s female assistant, was provided some brief backstory near the end of the volume as well.

While Tiger & Bunny Volume 7 seemed to focus on character development, it was woven into the action of the story in such a way where it didn’t simply come across as exposition and bog down the reader. It also helped that some of the character development, such as what was seen for Rock Bison and Origami Cyclone, aren’t blatantly stated. For those two characters, the reader realizes that this character development is there when they think back to how these characters had been portrayed in previous volumes of the series.

At this point in the series, the Tiger & Bunny manga has retained the characters and some of the situations from the anime, but it has really become its own story. But that’s not a bad thing, though. This “alternate universe” storytelling has kept the original concept and soul of the anime intact, but has found a way to tell its own story without making it come across as unrecognizable to readers who have already watched the anime series.

Readers who have read and enjoyed the previous volumes of the series should appreciate what they see in Tiger & Bunny Volume 7. And fans of American superhero comics might find something to appreciate in the superheroes and storytelling that appears in the Tiger & Bunny manga series.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Mizuki Sakakibara to Launch New Manga

The 177th issue of Kadokawa’s Kadokawa Niconico Ace online magazine has revealed that Mizuki Sakakibara will launch a new manga series titled Haira no SP -Ryubatsu-cho Chosa Shikkobu Dai-3-Ka (Haira no SP -Ryubatsu Agency Investigation Executives, Division 3) in the magazine’s next issue, which Kadokawa and Niconico Video will publish on April 14, 2015.

Sakakibara launched her manga adaptation of the 2011 Tiger & Bunny TV anime series in the Newtype Ace magazine in 2012. It then moved to the free digital magazine Kadokawa Niconico Ace in 2013. Kadokawa shipped the eighth compiled volume on November 10, 2014, and Sakakibara ended the manga in the same month. VIZ Media licensed Sakakibara’s manga adaptation in 2012 and shipped the sixth compiled volume in February 2015.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Six

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

Tiger & Bunny Volume 6
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: February 10, 2015

The series focuses on Kotetsu Kaburagi and Barnaby Brooks, Jr., who have become the first hero duo after Apollon Media buys out Kotetsu’s sponsor. Kotetsu (aka Wild Tiger) and Baranby may have the same superhero power, but they seem to be a mismatched hero duo.

Volume Six sees an escaped convict NEXT named Jake Martinez out of prison and working with a group of NEXT known as Ouroboros. We see that Ivan/Origami Cyclone’s friend, Edward, has escaped from prison with Jake and goes after Ivan for revenge. Edward blames Ivan for his ending up in prison instead of becoming a hero, because Ivan hesitated instead of backing him up when the two worked together as heroes. Ivan’s anguish is evident as he realizes that he has to fight against his former friend. Fortunately, he’s able to overcome that anguish and manages to get the upper hand. As he tries to talk to Edward, they’re interrupted by the arrival of an exosuit being piloted by a plush toy that’s controlled by Kriem, one of the members of Ouroboros. Ivan and Edward have to work together to take down the exosuit.

When Ivan and Edward’s fight takes place in the anime series, it’s depicted quite differently in this manga adaptation. In the anime, Edward escaped on his own and had no affiliation with Jake Martinez or Ouroboros. While this is a drastic change, I believe it works for the story that the manga is trying to tell. Since Edward now has a connection with Jake in this telling, it makes more sense for him to be appearing at this point in the story. Another difference is that in the anime, Edward is attacked by Lunatic, a NEXT who targets murderers. Here, they are attacked by one of Martinez’s exosuits because it was believed that Edward was turning against Ouroboros. Since Lunatic hasn’t played as major of a role in the manga, it made sense for the manga to make this change as well.

This volume also sees Jake Martinez storming into Justice Tower and holding everyone hostage. He also takes over the airwaves and encourages all the NEXT to gather at Justice Tower so they can establish a nation of NEXT.  Kotetsu, Barnaby, and Antonio/Rock Bison decide they need to disguise themselves as NEXT who are sympathetic to Jake’s cause in order to get inside Justice Tower to try to capture Jake or at least get footage of what’s going on inside. When they get there, they find three NEXT who have the power to sniff out danger, smell lies, and smell special powers. The heroes find they have to try to convince these NEXT that they aren’t heroes.

This section of the story is portrayed very differently here compared to the anime source material. But I have to say that the way the manga handled this adds more tension and action compared to the anime’s version of the story. Also, the three female NEXT who can sense danger, lies and special powers were the three villains who kidnapped the mayor’s child in the kidnapping story in the anime; in the manga telling, three men kidnapped the baby instead. Now that I see that these three female villains appear in this section instead, I have to admit that using their abilities here actually works better and helped to add tension to the story.

While I had noticed some differences between the anime and manga in Volume Five, this volume’s differences are much more drastic than in the previous volume. The changes in Volume Six aren’t necessarily bad, though… they’re just different. Where the changes in Volume Five weakened some of the character development and made me disappointed in that particular volume, I thought the changes in Volume Six helped to tighten up and strengthen the storytelling.

At this point, I look at the Tiger & Bunny manga as an “alternate timeline” version of the story, since the anime series served as the original source material. Now that I’ve seen these various changes, I’m very interested in reading future volumes in order to discover how much more the story will end up changing from the anime. I’m also curious to see how I will react to other changes that will inevitably have to be made due to the changes in the story that happened in this volume.

Reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

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Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Five

Tiger & Bunny Volume Five is a manga by Mizuki Sakakibara that is based on the anime series produced by Sunrise. This volume was published in North America by Viz Media in 2014. The series is rated “T” for teens; from seeing the television anime series I would agree with this rating.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 5
Written bu: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: June 10, 2014

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

The series focuses on Kotetsu Kaburagi and Barnaby Brooks, Jr., who have become the first hero duo after Apollon Media buys out Kotetsu’s sponsor. Kotetsu (aka Wild Tiger) and Baranby may have the same superhero power, but they seem to be a mismatched hero duo.

Volume Five continues the story where Dragon Kid is given the task of watching the mayor’s baby, who turns out to also be a NEXT. As I read the manga telling of the story, part of it just didn’t seem to match what I remembered seeing in the anime. So I sat down and re-watched episode nine, “Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child,” and discovered that more had been changed between the two tellings than I had remembered. The biggest of which is the fact that Blue Rose was not an integral character in this story in the anime.

Another big change is the fact that in the anime, three female NEXT successfully kidnap Dragon Kid and the mayor’s son and demand a ransom. In this telling, three men come up to Dragon Kid and Blue Rose and attempt to kidnap the baby; however, they are not successful because a member of Ouroboros arrives and creates a scene. I understand why this change was made in the manga, because they wanted to tie this storyline in with the next one that includes a bridge bombing and the escape of Jake Martinez, a member of Ouroboros.

Unfortunately, these changes ultimately watered down the story as it was originally presented in the anime. In the anime, the story with the mayor’s son was meant to be an episode that focused on Dragon Kid and to provide her with some character development; however, the changes that were made in the manga made it so this was no longer a true character development story for Dragon Kid since she has to share the spotlight with Blue Rose. Not only that, the humor that was present in the anime telling of this story is almost all but gone in the manga telling.

Another interesting change between this story in the anime and manga is the scene in Barnaby’s apartment where Kotetsu and Barnaby talk after the others have gone to sleep. In the anime, they’re going over the information Barnaby has found in regards to Ouroboros, and Barnaby goes into some detail about how he learned about Ouroboros in the first place. In the manga, Kotetsu is watching a news report about the NEXT Registration Act that she shuts off after Barnaby has checked to make sure the others are sleeping; we get a little bit of their conversation about Ouroboros here, but it’s not in as much detail as we got in the anime. While this isn’t as major of a change as reducing Dragon Kid’s role in the story, it’s still a noticeable change. I honestly have to say that this is the first time that I can think of in the manga where they made such drastic changes to the story.

The remainder of the volume focuses on the escape of Jake Martinez from prison and how he starts trying to take over Stern Bild in order to turn it into a nation of NEXT. This story incorporates the “Mad Bears,” which are rather ugly-looking teddy bears that the toy stores are selling and attempting to turn into the next fad. In the anime, we see Kotetsu goes and buys one for his daughter when he’s going to be heading home to visit her. However, this never happens in the manga, yet Kotetsu knows what the bears are when he sees one and scolds Agnes for not knowing the current toy trends. Without that scene of Kotetsu at the toy store, I have a hard time that he would know what they are, since he’s been portrayed as being rather clueless about the types of things that Kaede would like and the current trends for kids.

After realizing how different the story in this volume is in comparison with the anime, I found myself being a little disappointed with it. While I understand these changes were made in order to tighten up the story, I wish they didn’t have to be made at the expense of watering down what should have been a particular supporting character’s story. But now seeing the changes that were made in Volume Four, I wonder how many changes will continue to be made in the manga in future volumes. I’ll still keep reading, but at least I now know to anticipate that changes will potentially be made to the story.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Tiger & Bunny Volume Five that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Tiger & Bunny:

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Four

Tiger & Bunny Volume Four is a manga by Mizuki Sakakibara that is based on the anime series produced by Sunrise. This volume was published in North America by Viz Media in 2014. The series is rated “T” for teens; from seeing the television anime series I would agree with this rating.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 4
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: February 11, 2014

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

The series focuses on Kotetsu Kaburagi and Barnaby Brooks, Jr., who have become the first hero duo after Apollon Media buys out Kotetsu’s sponsor. Kotetsu (aka Wild Tiger) and Baranby may have the same superhero power, but they seem to be a mismatched hero duo.

In Volume Four, the superheroes fight against a NEXT named Lunatic, who goes around killing people who are accused of crimes. Unfortunately, the heroes can’t take down Lunatic whenever they encounter him, and this causes the anti-NEXT sentiments of the people to flare back up again.

In order to save Hero TV and fight against the anti-NEXT sentiment, the heroes are sent on various photo ops and events as part of a “Believe in Heroes” campaign. When Origami Cyclone is asked to give a special lecture to the students at his alma mater, the Hero Academy, he has a lot of doubts. Wild Tiger and Barnaby go with him, and during the scenes that take place at the academy, we get some good character development on Origami Cyclone that explains why he doesn’t really get involved with capturing the criminals and focuses on showing off his sponsor’s logo instead. But thanks to some advice he receives from Wild Tiger, Origami Cyclone decides to jump in and try to arrest the criminal.

I really liked getting this backstory for Origami Cyclone. Previous to this point, he simply came across as a loser who didn’t seem to take being a hero very seriously. But from seeing this backstory, it really does make sense why Origami Cyclone acts the way he does.

The final story that appears in Volume Four sees Dragon Kid being given the task of guarding the mayor’s son, who turns out to have NEXT abilities. Blue Rose and Wild Tiger help out, and it’s here that the others learn that Kotetsu is a widower with a 9-year-old daughter; this fact really catches Blue Rose off-guard. They end up watching the baby at Barnaby’s place.

Unfortunately, this story doesn’t conclude in this volume. Since I’ve seen the anime series already, I already know what’s going to happen; all I’m going to say is that the story arc with the mayor’s infant son is hilarious, and I’m looking forward to seeing how it’s presented in a manga format when I get the chance to read Volume Five.

While the first couple volumes of Tiger & Bunny were more on the light-hearted side, volumes Three and Four are both definitely more serious in nature. Learning Barnaby’s backstory about why he became a hero in the first place and the search he begins to take to look for his parents’ killer, encountering Lunatic, and the Origami Cyclone’s backstory are all very important to the series, and are also very serious in nature. At least the story with the baby in Volume Five will help provide a little bit of comic relief that’s been missing in both Volumes Three and Four. But the story with the baby isn’t just there for kicks, though; it’s also there to provide a little bit of backstory and character development for Dragon Kid as well.

Sakakibara continues to do a fantastic job of capturing the characters and storylines of the Tiger & Bunny anime series in this manga adaptation. Even though I already know the story from watching the anime series, I find myself still being drawn into the story as I read the manga.

If you’ve seen the Tiger & Bunny anime series and enjoyed it, then I would highly recommend checking out the manga adaptation of the series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Tiger & Bunny Volume Four that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Tiger & Bunny:

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Three

Tiger & Bunny Volume Three is a manga by Mizuki Sakakibara that is based on the anime series produced by Sunrise. This volume was published in North America by Viz Media in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from seeing the television anime series I would agree with this rating.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 3
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 8, 2013

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

The series focuses on Kotetsu Kaburagi and Barnaby Brooks, Jr., who have become the first hero duo after Apollon Media buys out Kotetsu’s sponsor. Kotetsu (aka Wild Tiger) and Baranby may have the same superhero power, but they seem to be a mismatched hero duo.

Volume Three sees Barnaby trying to get any leads he can on the peron who killed his parents when he was a child. He gets a clue when he learns that the meaning of the tattoo he saw on the killer’s hand represents that he was with Ouroboros. He then gets a call from someone claiming they have more information. On his way to the rendezvous point, he takes a taxi driven by Kotetsu’s former boss, Ben. Barnaby learns things about Kotetsu that he hadn’t known before.

When Barnaby gets to the rendezvous point, his informant is suddenly burned to death in front of him. Because it was a NEXT with fire ability, Fire Emblem is taken in as a suspect in the killing. Barnaby is then targeted by someone in a mecha. Kotetsu is able to come to the rescue, and after the fight’s finished, Kotetsu realizes the guy in the mecha was the one who planted the bomb in Volume Two. Later, the mecha attacks Fire Emblem and Agnes, and it’s up to Wild Tiger and Barnaby to save them.

Barnaby does some investigating on his own, and finds a warehouse where there’s more of the strange mecha. He convinces Agnes to have the heroes raid the warehouse for Hero TV, but they get a surprise when they go to get the mecha…

Volume Three is significant, because this is where we begin to see Kotetsu and Barnaby start to better understand one another and start working together a bit more as a team. While Barnaby learns a little bit about Kotetsu, Kotetsu also learns about the fact that Barnaby’s parents were killed when he was a child. This volume also hints at the fact that Karina (aka Blue Rose) may be developing feelings for Kotetsu.

Volume Three is a very action-oriented volume of the series, which helps to make it a quick read. Even though there’s a lot of action, there’s a bit of character development going on as well. The ending of Volume Three also introduces readers to a new villain known as Lunatic, who is also a NEXT.

I think that Sakakibara has done a great job capturing the characters and storyline from the Tiger & Bunny anime and presenting them in a manga format. Even though I already know the story from watching the anime series, I find myself still being drawn into the story as I read the manga.

If you’ve seen the Tiger & Bunny anime series and enjoyed it, then I would highly recommend checking out the manga adaptation of the series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Tiger & Bunny Volume Three that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Tiger & Bunny:

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume Two

Tiger & Bunny Volume Two is a manga by Mizuki Sakakibara that is based on the anime series produced by Sunrise. This volume was published in North America by Viz Media in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from seeing the television anime series I would agree with this rating.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 2
Written by: Mizuki Sakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: July 9, 2013

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

The series focuses on Kotetsu Kaburagi and Barnaby Brooks, Jr., who have become the first hero duo after Apollon Media buys out Kotetsu’s sponsor. Kotetsu (aka Wild Tiger) and Baranby may have the same superhero power, but they seem to be a mismatched hero duo.

Volume Two starts to give the reader a glimpse of Barnaby’s backstory, which starts to give the reader an understanding of why Barnaby acts the way he does. We learn that he’s out for justice to avenge the murder of his parents that happened when he was younger.

Most of the volume, however, focuses on Kotetsu and Barnaby’s issues with becoming a team. Things are only made wprse when Hero TV insists on doing a documentary on Barnaby and makes Kotetsu participate. Just as the tension between them reaches a boiling point, there’s a bomb threat at the restaurant they’re at. Kotetsu and Barnaby must work together in order to deactivate the bomb. It’s a tense situation, but they manage to work together to save the day.

Later, Kotetsu finds out that Barnaby’s birthday is coming up, and he decides he wants to do something. Kotetsu sets up a “crime” with the other heroes and forces Barnaby to come with him. Unfortunately, they find themselves in the middle of a real robbery in progress, and it’s up to the heroes to save the day. This story culminates with Kotetsu and Barnaby truly working together as a team for the first time.

Since reading the first volume of the Tiger & Bunny manga, I have gone on to watch all of the episodes of the anime series, as well as the first Tiger & Bunny anime film. While I already know what to expect and what’s coming up in the story from seeing the anime series, I’m still enjoying getting to see the story again in a different medium.

Volume Two also allows the readers to see a little more of the other heroes than the first volume did, especially during a scene where most of the heroes are in the gym. It’s revealed that Fire Emblem owns the company that sponsors him, and that Blue Rose wants to be a singer more than a superhero and is only allowed to pursue her singing career as her superhero alter ego.

Some wonderful characters were created for the anime series, and the manga does a great job of representing these characters. Their character designs also translated well for the manga format, and there are times where I almost think I’m looking at a black and white version of the anime.

I’ve really been enjoying the manga telling of the Tiger & Bunny series, and I’m looking forward to reading future volumes in order to see how the anime continues to be adapted for the manga medium.

If you’ve seen the Tiger & Bunny anime series and enjoyed it, then I would highly recommend checking out the manga adaptation of the series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Tiger & Bunny Volume Two that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Tiger & Bunny:

Manga Review: Tiger & Bunny Volume One

Article first published as Manga Review: ‘Tiger & Bunny’ Volume One by Mizuki Sakakibara on Blogcritics.

Tiger & Bunny Volume One is a manga by Mizuki Sakakibara that is based on the anime series produced by Sunrise. This volume was published in North America by Viz Media in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read so far, I would agree with this rating.

Tiger & Bunny Volume 1
Written by: Mizuki Sakakibara
Publisher: Kadokawa Shoten
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: April 9, 2013

45 years prior to the start of the series, superpowered individuals known as “NEXT” started appearing through a mysterious mutation. Some of them have become superheroes who protect Stern Bild, and each of the city’s famous superheroes work for a sponsor company. Their heroic activities are broadcast on the popular television show Hero TV, where they accumulate points for each heroic feat they accomplish. The best ranked hero of the season is crowned “King of Heroes.”

The main focus of the series is on Kotetsu Kaburagi, who is the real identity for the hero Wild Tiger. He’s a veteran superhero past his prime and has a total disregard for private property when he’s trying to nab the villains. During an episode of Hero TV, he ends up being rescued by Barnaby Brooks, Jr., a new superhero in the city. Unlike Wild Tiger and the others, Barnaby doesn’t even try to hide his identity for the audience, and Barnaby considers Kotetsu to be an old man.

Kotetsu and Barnaby have to become a team after their sponsor, Apollon Media, decides it wants to create the first superhero duo the world has ever known. The remainder of the volume focuses on the interactions between this mismatched duo of heroes.

One of the standout qualities of this manga volume to me was the art. The style stays true to the original anime series, and there’s some good use of detail in some of the panels. This manga is definitely very nice to look at, especially for readers who are already familiar with the Tiger & Bunny anime series.

I have to say that I really enjoy the story in Tiger & Bunny. Let’s be honest, having superheroes in Japanese manga isn’t a very common thing, so this concept is a bit more unique for manga. Having the superheroes participating in a reality TV show also adds a modern touch to the story, and this also helps to make the story of Tiger & Bunny feel rather unique in comparison to other manga series.

The character interactions are also a strong component of Tiger & Bunny, and in this volume, this is especially true for Kotetsu and Barnaby. They’re a perfectly mismatched duo and they serve as the perfect foil for the other. Their interactions are a major driving force of the story in this volume after they become a team.

Overall, I really enjoyed reading this first volume of the Tiger & Bunny manga series, and I didn’t want to put it down as I was reading it. The way the two main characters are built up in this volume, the reader becomes engrossed in the characters and their world; I definitely want to try to read the second volume of this series at such a time as I am able to.

And after reading this volume, I believe this is a series that could potentially appeal to readers who may read American superhero comics but don’t read manga. This is also a series that should hold appeal to readers who enjoy manga as well.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Tiger & Bunny Volume One that I checked out through the King County Library System.

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