Future Card Shin Buddyfight Manga to End in February 2019

The February 2019 issue of Shogakukan’s Coro Coro Comics magazine has announced that Mitsuhisa Tamura’s Future Card Shin Buddyfight manga will end in the next issue on February 15, 2019.

Tamura launched the manga in the magazine on May 15, 2018. The first compiled book volume shipped on October 25, 2018.

The manga is part of a franchise inspired by Bushiroad’s trading card game of the same name.

Source: ANN

Future Card Buddyfight Manga Ends, New Series to Launch in May 2018

The May 2018 issue of Shogakukan’s Coro Coro Comics magazine has published the last chapter of Mitsuhisa Tamura’s Future Card Buddyfight manga. The same issue also announced that a new manga titled Future Card Shin Buddyfight will launch in the magazine’s next issue on May 15, 2018.

Tamura began the manga inspired by Bushiroad’s trading card game in 2013. Shogakukan shipped the manga’s 10th compiled book volume on November 28, 2017.

Source: ANN

Future Card Buddyfight Manga Is Ending in Coro Coro Comic Magazine

The February 2015 issue of Shogakukan’s Coro Coro Comic magazine is announcing that Mitsuhisa Tamura’s Future Card Buddyfight manga will end in the magazine’s March 2015 issue. Tamura began the manga, which was inspired by Bushiroad’s trading card game, in 2013.

The magazine also announced that a “shocking announcement” about the series will also be made in the March 2015 issue.

The manga is part of a franchise inspired by the Future Card Buddyfight card game. Crunchyroll is currently streaming episodes from the English-dubbed version of the anime series, and the dub is also streaming on YouTube and Hulu.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume Five

Article first published as Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume Five by Mitsuhisa Tamura on Blogcritics.

Bakegyamon Volume Five is a manga by Mitsuhisa Tamura. Viz Media released this manga in North America through its VizKids imprint in 2009. This series is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.

Bakegyamon Volume 5
Written by: Mitsuhisa Tamura
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: December 1, 2009

The main character of Bakegyamon is an energetic young man named Sanshiro who lives on a small island with his grandparents. He longs for adventure and wants to be an explorer like his father; however, his grandparents are not supportive of his dreams and goals. One day, after receiving a lecture from his grandparents, Sanshiro hears a mysterious voice asking if he wants an adventure. Suddenly, seals appear all over the room, and the voice instructs Sanshiro to peel one. After peeling one of the seals, he receives s “starter kit” for a game called Bakegyamon. A man named Fue also appears, and says that he is Sanshiro’s guide to the game. Fue takes Sanshiro to Backwards Japan, which is a place that is a backwards version of Japan. Sanshiro learns from Fue that whoever wins at Bakegyamon will be granted a single wish.

Over the course of the game, Sanshiro meets some of the other players, including: Mikiharo Kawaguchi (a boy who gets ahead in the game by tricking other players), Sayaka Oki (a girl who is friends with a monster who was taken away to be a card in Bakegyamon), Shu Satomura (a boy who believes he must always come in first and be perfect when doing it), and Toshio Sageusa (a boy Sanshiro nicknames “London” due to the Union Jack bandana that he wears on his head).

As Sanshiro progresses through the game, he comes to care about the creatures in the cards that the players use when they battle in Bakegyamon. When Sanshiro is in a battle, he’s always conscious about how he uses his creatures, and he tries to find ways to win his battles without harming his opponent’s creature.

There are several hidden truths about the game of Bakegyamon, and several of them are revealed in Volume Four of the series. Volume Five is the final volume of Bakegyamon, and all of the loose ends are tied up rather neatly. If you’ve read the preceding volumes of the series, then you will probably be satisfied with how it ends.

When it comes to the concept for the series, it felt like the creator of Bakegyamon took ideas from such series as Yu-Gi-Oh! and Pokemon and tried to put some new twists into those concepts. Unfortunately, the series continued to feel derivative until you reached Volume Four. By this point, the changes and information introduced in that volume felt as if it was “too little, too late.” It also left me with the impression that Tamura was realizing he was getting near the end of the story and needed to throw all of that exposition out there before concluding the series. This makes the final two volumes feel a bit rushed, and this probably could have been avoided if some of this exposition had been made a little earlier on.

Unfortunately, there also isn’t much in the art style of Bakegyamon to make it stand out from other “fighting” manga series. Personally, I felt that the character design for Sanshiro feels a little too similar to Ash Ketchum from Pokemon, except for the fact that Sanshiro wears his cap backwards. The similarity in their design is reinforced by Sanshiro’s energetic personality being similar to Ash’s. There was another character in the series whose face had a strong resemblance to Shikamaru Nara from Naruto. And since Bakegyamon is a shonen action/fighting series, it has plenty of the “busy” manga panels that are associated with this genre.

If you’re a reader who enjoys shonen “fighting” manga titles like Pokemon Adventures and Yu-Gi-Oh!, you might find some enjoyment in reading the Bakegyamon manga series.

I wrote this review after checking out Bakegyamon Volume Five through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bakegyamon:

Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume Four

Bakegyamon Volume 4 has the story and art done by Mitsuhisa Tamura, and the original concept for the series came from Kazuhiro Fujita. Vizkids, an imprint of Viz Media, holds the North American rights to distribute the manga in the United States. This English adaptation, which is presented as an “unflipped” release, was done by Stan!, with a translation done by Labaaman, HC Language Solutions, Inc. This edition of the manga was published in 2009. Bakegyamon is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.

Bakegyamon Volume 4
Written by: Mitsuhisa Tamura
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 6, 2009

Volume 4 begins with London starting into his next round. It turns out his opponent is Gen Ohkuma, an old friend of London’s who played music with him. This is followed by a battle between Yukinoshin and Shiori. Next, Sanshiro and Yukinoshin are set to do battle, and Yukinoshin helps Sanshiro understand one of his creatures (Enzan) better. After that battle is decided, this volume climaxes with revealing several hidden truths about the Bakegyamon game.

By the time you finish reading this volume, you can really sense that the story is quickly reaching its climax. For me, when I discovered one of the hidden truths while reading this volume, I thought to myself that perhaps I should have suspected something was off with this character a little sooner, especially since they just seemed to disappear after Volume 2. With some of the details that come out over the course of this manga volume, it helps to make this manga series to make a little more sense to the reader.

Once again, the art style is pretty consistent with the previous three volumes of Bakegyamon. There’s the usual “busy” panels earlier on in this volume; however, since the last third or so is exposition, the “busy” looking panels all but disappear.

This volume finally starts to give us a story that feels a little less “derivative” than the previous volumes in this manga series. Unfortunately, though, it feels like this change is “too little, too late.” By waiting to reveal as much as is revealed in this volume, it feels like Tamura was realizing he was getting near the end of the story, and needed to throw all of this information out there before concluding the series. If there had been some way to hint at more of this in earlier volumes, then it wouldn’t feel quite so rushed at this point. However, with the structure that Tamura used to tell the story, there probably wasn’t any real way to provide more hints in earlier volumes.

If you’re a manga reader who enjoys “fighting” manga titles like Pokemon Adventures and Yu-Gi-Oh!, you may also find enjoyment in reading the Bakegyamon manga series.

I wrote this review after checking out a copy of this manga volume through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bakegyamon:

Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume Three

Bakegyamon Volume 3 has the story and art done by Mitsuhisa Tamura, and the original concept for the series came from Kazuhiro Fujita. Vizkids, an imprint of Viz Media, holds the North American rights to distribute the manga in the United States. This English adaptation, which is presented as an “unflipped” release, was done by Stan!, with a translation done by Labaaman, HC Language Solutions, Inc. This edition of the manga was published in 2009. Bakegyamon is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.

Bakegyamon Volume 3
Written by: Mitsuhisa Tamura
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: August 4, 2009

This volume starts exactly where Volume 2 ended, with Sanshiro and Mohawk starting into a “Pushing Buns” contest. During the course of this volume, Sanshiro battles against Mohawk, London battles against Rio Ruijima, Shiori Fumizuki battles against an unnamed opponent, Mick battles against an unnamed opponent, Raiya Innami battles against an unnamed opponent, Yukinoshin Kaburagi battles against an unnamed opponent, Sanshiro battles against Toru Kureiri, Mitch battles against Sanshiro, the remaining players get to relax at a hot spring resort, and Sanshiro battles against Raiya. This volume is chock full of various battles, as the game of Bakegyamon heats up. Whenever Sanshiro is in a battle, he’s always conscious not only of his own creature, but he tries to find ways to win his battles without harming his opponent’s creature.

Even though I find Sanshiro’s feelings for the creatures admirable, it still reminds me a lot of Ash Ketchum from Pokemon. Overall, I still really don’t see much that makes Bakegyamon stand out from other “fighting” manga series.

The art style really hasn’t shown much change from the previous two volumes in the series. While some of the newer characters introduced still have a derivative-looking character design, I’m not coming up with other characters they resemble as easily as I did in the previous two volumes. Hopefully, this is a sign that Mitsuhisa Tamura started going to a little more effort at this point when it came to character design. And since there was a lot of battles included in this volume, there were more “busy” panels in this volume of the manga in comparison to Volume 2.

After reading this volume, there really wasn’t anything to make Bakegyamon feel less like a derivate work than the previous two volumes had. However, if you enjoy “fighting” manga titles such as Pokemon Adventures and Yu-Gi-Oh!, then you might also find enjoyment in Bakegyamon.

I wrote this review after checking out a copy of this manga volume through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bakegyamon:

Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume Two

Bakegyamon Volume 2 has the story and art done by Mitsuhisa Tamura, and the original concept for the series came from Kazuhiro Fujita. Vizkids, an imprint of Viz Media, holds the North American rights to distribute the manga in the United States. This English adaptation, which is presented as an “unflipped” release, was done by Stan!, with a translation done by Labaaman, HC Language Solutions, Inc. This edition of the manga was published in 2009. Bakegyamon is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.

Bakegyamon Volume 2
Written by: Mitsuhisa Tamura
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: May 5, 2009

This volume starts exactly where Volume 1 concluded, with Sanshiro trying to complete the stage of the game that he’s in. During the course of this volume, Sanshiro competes in two more stages; he’s just starting into a third when the volume ends. Sanshiro also meets some other players in the game: Mikiharo Kawaguchi (a boy who gets ahead in the game by tricking other players), Sayaka Oki (a girl who is friends with a monster who was taken away to be a card in Bakegyamon), and Shu Satomura (a boy believes he must always come in first and be perfect when doing it). We also get a little bit of backstory for Toshio Sageusa (a boy Sanshiro nicknames “London” due to the Union Jack bandana he wears on his head); this character was introduced in the first volume of Bakegyamon.

While this volume does present us some new characters and begins to provide a backstory for an already existing character, I still feel that Bakegyamon feels like a derivative manga property that’s simply taking elements from manga titles with similar themes and just adding a few twists in order to make it seem “different” from these other manga titles.

The art style hasn’t really changed from the first volume of the manga series. In both this volume and the previous volume, I’ve seen a background character who hasn’t been named with a face design that looks suspiciously similar to Shikamaru from Naruto. Sanshiro still has his look and personality that feels reminiscent to Ask Ketchum from Pokemon. However, most of the other characters that appear in this volume don’t look nearly as derivative as Sanshiro.

After reading a second volume of this manga, I’m still left with the impression that Bakegyamon feels like a derivative work. However, if you enjoy such manga titles as Yu-Gi-Oh! and Pokemon Adventures, then you might also enjoy Bakegyamon.

I wrote this review after checking out a copy of this manga volume through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bakegyamon:

Manga Review: Bakegyamon Volume One

Bakegyamon Volume 1 has the story and art done by Mitsuhisa Tamura, and the original concept for the series came from Kazuhiro Fujita. Vizkids, an imprint of Viz Media, holds the North American rights to distribute the manga in the United States. This English adaptation, which is presented as an “unflipped” release, was done by Stan!, with a translation done by Labaaman, HC Language Solutions, Inc. This edition of the manga was published in 2009. Bakegyamon is rated “A,” which means it is suitable for readers of all ages.

Bakegyamon Volume 1
Written by: Mitsuhisa Tamura
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: March 3, 2009

The main character of the series is Sanshiro, an energetic young man who lives on a small island with his grandparents. Sanshiro wants to become an explorer, like his father; he also longs for adventure. His grandparents, however, are not supportive of these dreams and goals. One day, after Sanshiro has received another lecture from his grandparents, he hears a mysterious voice asking if he wants an adventure. Suddenly, seals appear all over the room, and the voice instructs Sanshiro to peel one. When he peels off a seal, he receives a “starter kit” for a game; a man named Fue also appears, saying that he is Sanshiro’s guide to Bakegyamon. Fue takes Sanshiro to Backwards Japan, a place that is a backwards version of Japan. Fue also tells Sanshiro that whoever wins at Bakegyamon will be granted a single wish. After their arrival at Backwards Japan, the game begins!

Concept-wise, it feels like the creator of Bakegyamon took ideas from series such as Yu-Gi-Oh! and Pokemon and tried to put some new twists into the concept. Overall, I don’t really feel there’s much here to distinguish Bakegyamon from other similar “fighting” manga series aimed at the shonen audience. Perhaps future volumes of the series will find a way to distinguish itself from these other properties.

The art style also doesn’t have very much to make it stand out from other manga properties that have a similar premise. Like other shonen manga, this one also has its fair share of the “busy” panels, especially during action sequences. Personally, I thought the character design for Sanshiro feels a little too similar to Ask Ketchum (except for the fact that Sanhiro wears his cap backwards); these similarities in design are only reinforced by the characters’ similar enthusiastic personalities.

In the end, I was left with the impression that Bakegyamon felt like a derivative story. However, if you enjoy manga series such as Yu-Gi-Oh! and Pokemon Adventures, you might also find enjoyment in Bakegyamon.

I wrote this review after checking out a copy of this manga volume through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bakegyamon: