FUNimation Entertainment Adds the Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic and the Magi: The Kingdom of Magic Anime to Its Catalog

FUNimation Entertainment has announced that it will begin streaming the Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic and Magi: The Kingdom of Magic anime with an English dub and subtitles on December 17, 2019.

The Magi: The Labyrinth of Magic anime premiered in Japan in October 2012. The second anime, Magi: The Kingdom of Magic, debuted in October 2013.

Source: ANN

Magi: Adventure of Sinbad Spin-off Manga Ends

Shinobu Ohtaka and Yoshifumi Ōtera’s spin-off manga Magi: Sinbad no Bōken (Magi: Adventure of Sinbad) manga ended in Shogakukan’s Manga ONE app on April 25, 2018. The manga’s 18th and 19th compiled book volumes are scheduled to be released in July 2018.

The manga is a spin-off of Ohtaka’s Magi manga. The series takes place 30 years before the events of Magi and focuses on Sinbad’s journey to become king.

Source: ANN

Manga Review: Magi Volume 16

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Magi Volume 16 focuses on Aladdin, a young man who is a Magi and has the ability to gather the Magoi of Rukh.

Magi Volume 16
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: February 9, 2016

Volume 16 focuses exclusively on Aladdin and his time at the Magnoshutatt Academy. While Aladdin is one of two students able to advance to Year 2, he discovers that he’s not the top student. The announcement of the top student brings about the introduction of a new character: Titus Alexius.

When we first see Titus, the character design had me convinced that this character was female. But from something Aladdin does, it’s made clear that Titus is actually a guy. While having this kind of a “trap” character can be amusing in manga, I didn’t think that this element enhanced Titus’ character at all.

At first, Aladdin and Titus start out as rivals. Their rivalry leads to a magical sparring competition between the two of them, which provides some exciting action for this volume. It turns out that both of them know some rather impressive magic, which makes their sparring match even more interesting to read. It turns out that Titus has a secret, but when Aladdin learns about it, this ties the two of them together and they work at becoming friends. The “rivals becoming friends” element is a rather common trope, so it wasn’t terribly surprising when Aladdin and Titus’ rivalry evolved into friendship.

Aladdin, Titus, and fellow student Sphintus gain new privileges, and get to see some sections of the city they have never seen before. With this access, they are able to view the lives of some of the non-magical people. With Aladdin on a quest to stop potential fighting between magical and non-magical people that could destroy the world, this is a great opportunity for him. But the three students discover a startling secret and decide to investigate, knowing there’s a chance they could be expelled if they’re discovered.

Magi Volume 16 keeps the reader interested from the front cover to the back cover. The two secrets that play an important role in this story are intriguing and keep the reader’s interest. I know that as I started learning about these secrets, I found myself wanting to keep reading in order to find out everything there was about them. But of the two secrets, I have to say that the one that Aladdin and the other two students stumble upon is the more interesting one.

Readers who have been reading and following this series from the beginning won’t want to miss Magi Volume 16. The character of Alexis adds a new layer for Aladdin and his mission, and the two secrets revealed in this volume will be of interest to readers.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional post about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume 15

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Magi Volume 15 features a young man named Aladdin, who is a Magi that has the ability to gather the Magoi of Rukh.

Magi Volume 15
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: December 8, 2015

Roughly the first half of Volume 15 focuses on Alibaba and his attempts at getting into Shambal Ramal’s gladiator training school so he can learn Magoi manipulation from the Yanbara tribe. Unfortunately, before he arrived, he was robbed and arrives at the school weak from hunger. A woman at the school named Toto turns him away, especially after she challenges him to a sword duel and he loses so easily due to his weakness. But Alibaba has a surprise reunion and is able to regain his strength. Through a chance encounter and another sword duel with Toto, Alibaba makes it into the school. And Alibaba learns something important about his Magoi.

I, along with Alibaba, was shocked to see what the colosseum battle at the school really is. I was just as surprised as he was when he suddenly found himself in a fight with a monster. This fight really keeps the reader on the edge of their seat, especially since there are a couple of occasions where it looks like Alibaba isn’t going to survive. But this fight in the colosseum serves a very important purpose for Alibaba’s overall character development.

The other major focus of Magi Volume 15 is the Kou Empire and the politics that flare up after the unexpected death of their emperor. Hakuryu plays an important role in this section of the story, and it looks like he’s going to find himself embroiled in the tumult that is taking place in the royal family. Also, it’s very strongly hinted during this volume that the death of the emperor could lead to war breaking out and potentially destroying the other lands that the reader has come to know through Aladdin’s travels.

We also get to see a little bit of what’s going on with Morgiana during her journey. We see just enough of her trying to reach where the other Fanaris are, and her encounter with someone warning her about the Kou Empire and the war that seems to be destined to happen. Between this scene, a scene with a new character named Scheherazade, and what is shown of the Kou Empire, I truly believe that Ohtaka is going to have the story head toward the direction of a war being launched by the Kou Empire.

Aladdin also shows up briefly right at the end of the volume. I really didn’t mind the fact that he didn’t appear much in this volume, since there was such a strong focus on him back in Volume 14.

For the most part, it seems that the major purpose for Volume 15 is to lay the groundwork for a forthcoming war. However, there was also some important information and backstory revealed for Alibaba, which seems to be setting the course for what he’ll be doing next after he finishes training at the gladiator school.

When it comes to the art, there are a couple of panels that stand out of the monster during the duel with Alibaba. Also, I thought the panels introducing Scheherazade also stood out, because it seemed like Ohtaka went to some effort to give her an almost radiant and blinding look.

Readers who have enjoyed reading the previous volumes of the series will want to read Magi Volume 15 in order to see what has happened to the protagonists after they have gone their separate ways to pursue their own journey. Also, it seems that this volume will potentially mark a turning point for the series and start taking the story in a new direction. With this potential shift, fans of the series won’t want to miss out on Volume 15.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume 14

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Magi Volume 14 features Aladdin, a young man who is a Magi and has the ability to gather the Magoi of Rukh to power his magic.

Magi Volume 14
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 13, 2015

Volume 14 picks right back up from where Volume 13 ended. Madaura, the woman who has the ability to make children think she’s their mother, appears to have all of the protagonists under her control. But Aladdin is able to avoid being tricked since he never knew his mother, and it’s up to him to save the others. But Hakuryu doesn’t respond to Aladdin and the others, and instead begins attacking Alibaba.

This portion of Magi Volume 14 includes quite a bit of backstory for Hakuryu. While some of it had been mentioned in passing in earlier volumes, we get to see complete flashbacks here. It turns out he has a rather tragic past, and as he realizes the truth about something, his personality changes to the point where he’s hardly anything like the Hakuryu we’d come to know up until now. He becomes obsessed over both revenge and Morgiana. Around halfway through the volume, Hakuryu and the other go their separate ways, but his confession to Morgiana has an effect on her. The flashbacks were riveting to read, and I appreciated all the backstory they contained for Hakuryu.

Not too long after this, Aladdin, Alibaba, and Morgiana go off in three different directions in order to try to accomplish the missions that they have been given. The remainder of the volume focuses on Aladdin as he heads to Magnoshutatt in order to study magic at the academy there.

During Aladdin’s travels, the audience is introduced to a new character named Koha Ren. Koha is the third prince of the Kou Empire. Not surprisingly, Koha is a stuck up and pampered prince, and doesn’t seem to think much of Aladdin. The only reason Koha spends time with him is due to the fact that they’re traveling in the same carriage and heading to the same location. In the end, we don’t see Koha for very long in this volume, but I suspect he’ll likely reappear at some later point in the series.

When Aladdin makes it to Magnoshutatt, he finds himself being placed in the lowest class for the first years at the academy, since he has to hide the fact that he’s a Magi and can gather Rukh. To start off, Aladdin and his class are put through a lot of physical training, and it’s run almost like a military boot camp. Some of what happens during Aladdin’s physical training is amusing. And it turns out that it’s not too surprising what ultimately motivates Aladdin to keep going during all of the physical training. But Aladdin is amazed to see how all of the physical training helps him to improve his magic without the Rukh.

A lot of character development and plot progression takes place over the course of Magi Volume 14. Hakuryu gets the character development, and Aladdin sees the plot progression. This ended up being an enjoyable read, and the story kept my interest throughout the volume. But with the way Volume 14 ends, it looks like the series will be shifting its focus away from Aladdin and onto another one of the protagonists for Volume 15.

When it comes to the art, there are some very impressive action panels during the fight between Hakuryu and Alibaba. And after Hakuryu goes through his change in attitude, I can see that Ohtaka made changes to the way his expressions are drawn. You can just tell by looking at Hakuryu’s face that his demeanor has changed. I thought this was a very nice touch.

Fans of the series won’t want to miss Magi Volume 14, because it introduces several changes for the characters and their situations. Readers will appreciate seeing Hakuryu’s backstory, as well as seeing Aladdin going through all of the rigors of the magic academy.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume 13

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Magi Volume 13 focuses on a young man named Aladdin, who has discovered that he’s a Magi and has the ability to gather the Magoi of Rukh to power his magic.

Magi Volume 13
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: August 11, 2015

Volume 13 sees Morgiana becoming closer with Hakuryu after learning that they learn about each other’s childhood. It appears that Hakuryu may be developing feelings for Morgiana.

We also get to see Sinbad and Kougyoku performing a full-body djinn equip, which leads to them having an impressive sparring match. While they both drastically change their appearances, Kougyoku has a much more noticeable change in her demeanor in this state. Alibaba, who has been struggling with only being able to weapon equip, is impressed by what he sees. But he also feels discouraged at the same time. But Sinbad gives him some information and advice that ultimately leads Alibaba to make an important decision.

Not too long after this, Sinbad and his friends decide to leave Sindria. While they’ll travel together at first, their ultimate goal will be to go their separate ways to accomplish what they need to do. At first, it seems that Alibaba isn’t going with them. However, it’s revealed that Alibaba has stowed away on their ship, and this leads to a scene of comic relief leading up to the revelation to the others that he’s actually on board. This comic relief scene was needed after the seriousness of the character interactions and the intensity of the action that takes place before then.

This comic relief moment ultimately leads to a storyline of the group being attacked by pirates. But they’re not attacked by ordinary pirates. They’re children under the control of a woman who has the ability to make them think that she’s their mother in order to make them do what she wants. This leads to an interesting predicament for Morgiana and Alibaba right at the end of the volume.

There were some great character development moments sprinkled throughout Magi Volume 13. Morgiana and Hakuryu had their scene, Alibaba had a scene with Kougyoku, and the storyline with the child pirates also struck a nerve. And if this wasn’t enough, the ending of the volume has a strong cliffhanger that makes readers want to continue with the story in order to find out what will happen to the characters.

To me, the art in Magi Volume 13 was at its strongest during the sparring sequence between Sinbad and Kougyoku. It drew the reader into the action, and it seemed to have some of the best use of detail. Ohtaka also seemed to put a lot of effort into the design for Madaura, the “mother” of the child pirates.

Magi Volume 13 should be a satisfying read for fans of the series with the mixture of character development, action, and humor that it provides.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume 12

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

Magi Volume 12 focuses on Aladdin, a young man who is a Magi and has the ability to gather the Magoi of Rukh to power his magic.

Magi Volume 12
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: June 9, 2015

Volume 12 opens with Yamraiha finishing off a battle with a member of Al-Thamen. How Yamraiha brings about the conclusion of this battle is actually rather surprising, but it turns out to be very effective.

However, a lot of Magi Volume 12 actually focuses on Sinbad and what he goes through. He is being surprised by the arrival of Judar, a Magi working for Al-Thamen as the oracle of the Kou Empire. The two of them exchange heated words, with Judar declaring that he wants to destroy Sindria. As a representative of the Kou Empire, this could be perceived as the empire declaring war on Sinbad. This event creates a tense undercurrent that basically runs throughout the rest of the volume.

A princess of the Kou Empire has fled to Sindria and is being protected by Sinbad. We see several interactions between Sinbad and the princess throughout this volume, and these scenes almost lead the reader to believe that perhaps Sinbad might have an interest in her. Unfortunately, there’s a scene near the end of the volume that appears to squash this potential relationship.

Aladdin and the others return to Sindria, and shortly after their arrival, Hakuryu suffers a side effect from being bitten by a snake: his hand falls off and Ithnan manifests himself from the hand. Ithnan casts a curse on Sinbad and Alibaba. Yamraiha discovers the curse is just corruption being caused by magic, but she doesn’t know the formula to dispel it. Even though he is cursed, Sinbad is able to chase down and defeat Ithnan. But even with Ithnan’s defeat, it ultimately takes Aladdin’s power to heal Alibaba.

At the end of Volume 12, Aladdin makes a big decision that will have a major impact on the direction that the story is headed.  This decision includes both heading to a new location and leaving his current friends behind. But after what happened in Sindria, it’s really not surprising that Aladdin decides to take this step.

Magi Volume 12 has some emphasis on action, but the majority of the story focuses more on interactions between characters. A lot of the character interactions focus on Sinbad, which I thought was a good thing. I appreciated getting to see more of Sinbad, because it helped me to start better understanding him as a character. I also thought that the Kou Empire princess, along with her brother who is in Sindira with her, added interesting layers to the story.

When it comes to the art, it appears that many of the newer characters introduced into the series have more detail to their designs than Aladdin. However, I noticed in this volume that Alibaba’s design feels different compared to how he looked in earlier volumes of the series. Perhaps this noticeable change in his design is to signify that he has changed and progressed as a character.

Magi Volume 12 should be able to captivate long time readers of the series, especially when it comes to Sinbad’s various character interactions. This volume makes some important revelations and introduces forthcoming changes that should make the story an interesting read for the fans.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume 10

Originally written for WatchPlayRead.com

The story of Magi is set in an alternate recreation of the ancient Old World with several regions and nations bearing some resemblance with their real-life counterparts from that time. This world includes several magic castles full of treasures and traps that are known as “Dungeons,” and each of them is the home of a powerful magic being called a Djinn. Those who overcome the trials of the Dungeon earn the allegiance of its Djinn and gain the ability to use its powers infused in a personal item of theirs.

Magi Volume 10
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: February 10, 2015

Aladdin and his friends have been sent by King Sinbad to Tran Island to explore the Dungeon known as Zagan. On this quest, Aladdin is joined by Alibaba, Morgiana, and Hakuryu Ren, a prince of the Kou Empire who is visiting Sindria. Their first obstacle is getting the permission of the Tran Village Elder to visit the Dungeon. He refuses at first, until he learns that this is a request from King Sinbad. But the Elder will only agree to let them go if they will take one of his grandchildren to help them navigate the reefs. Three merchants also arrive to get the elder’s blessing, and I swear that these three characters almost looked as if they walked straight out of the Bleach manga series.

One of the elder’s granddaughters guides the group to Zagan and wants to go with them to rescue her parents. Hakuryu says she can’t and that he will either find her parents or avenge her parents’ deaths for her. As soon as I read this scene, I knew that she was going to find some way to enter the Dungeon without their knowledge and somehow cause trouble for the group. Sure enough, I was proven right later in the volume.

As they enter the Dungeon, Alibaba has an encounter with a Djinn named Amon, who offers to lend his strength to his master to help him defeat the twisted Djinn Zagan. When the reader sees the inside of the Dungeon, it looks rather beautiful and awe-inspiring, so it’s hard to believe that there could be anything wrong. But looks are deceiving when some of the flowers and cute critters start saying they want to eat the humans. When one of the creatures becomes angry and attacks, Aladdin and Alibaba defeat it.

And then Zagan suddenly appears, looking so flamboyant that it’s almost frightening. We then see that Zagan truly is as twisted as Amon claimed he was. Zagan takes the Tran Elder’s granddaughter hostage. The others try to rescue her, but the Djinn says he’ll only free her if they can reach the treasure room.

The remainder of Volume 10 focuses on Aladdin and the others trying to make it past the various traps and obstacles that Zagan has put in their way in order to prevent them from reaching the treasure room. During these battles, Hakuryu sees how strong his companions are and feels he has to rely on the others too much. Hakuryu tries asking them to not help him, but Alibaba encourages him to rely on the others. This becomes a point of contention more than once over the course of Volume 10, but Alibaba teaches the prince a lesson that makes him change his stance. As a reader, I appreciated seeing Hakuryu evolve from the proud prince that first enters the dungeon into someone who isn’t afraid to ask for help and rely on his companions.

Near the end of Volume 10, Aladdin and the others learn the fate of the Tran Villagers who disappeared, and their mission becomes more than just capturing a Dungeon. I have to say that Ohtaka did a great job depicting the characters’ disgust at this news in their facial expressions.

This volume of Magi is very action-oriented once Aladdin and his friends enter the Dungeon and begin encountering Zagan’s creatures and traps. But there’s also the occasional character development moment as well. Hakuryu is the primary character with these moments, but an argument can also be made that Morgiana has some development in Volume 10.

While the art in the Magi series may still not be anything terribly special, Ohtaka has made some improvements in her style between Volume One and Volume 10. Newer characters, such as Zagan and Hakuryu, seem to have more detail in their designs than Aladdin and the other characters that have been in the series since the beginning. Her art style isn’t bad, it’s just that there hasn’t been very much that jumps out at me as being something that stands out in comparison to other manga that I’ve read.

For fans of Magi who have been following the series since the very beginning, Volume 10 should be a compelling read, especially when it comes to Hakuryu’s character development.

The reviewer was provided a review copy by VIZ Media

Additional posts about Magi:

Manga Review: Magi Volume One

Magi has an Arabian Nights theme, and it features Aladdin and Alibaba as the main characters.

Magi Volume 1
Written by: Shinobu Ohtaka
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: August 13, 2013

The story of Magi is set in an alternate recreation of the ancient Old World with several regions and nations bearing some resemblance with their real-life counterparts from that time. This world includes several magic castles full of treasures and traps that are known as “Dungeons,” and each of them is the home of a powerful magic being called a Djinn. Those who overcome the trials of the Dungeon earn the allegiance of its Djinn and gain the ability to use its powers infused in a personal item of theirs.

A boy named Aladdin travels the world, and while on his journey, he meets a merchant named Laylah, and Sasha, the daughter of a caravan leader. They first meet when a hungry Aladdin eats up the fruit that Laylah was going to sell, and Laylah forces Aladdin to work three days for her for free to make up for it. Aladdin carries around a flute, which turns out to be the vessel for a Djinn named Ugo. When the caravan is attacked by bandits, it’s revealed that Laylah was working for them; however, we see that Laylah truly came to see Sasha as a friend and didn’t want to follow through on her mission. When the caravan leaves, Laylah knows they’re heading for a trap, and it’s up to her and Aladdin to save them.

This first story is basically here to establish the character of Aladdin, as well as the fact that he has a Djinn. It’s revealed rather quickly that while Aladdin may look like a little kid, he’s actually very perverted. He gets rather “friendly” with Sasha at one point during the story, and we also see Aladdin’s pervy side in action later in the volume.

Aladdin doesn’t stay with Laylah and Sasha for long, and he continues on his journey in a carriage being driven by Alibaba. A wealthy wine merchant, along with a woman and her daughter, are also passengers on the carriage. The carriage gets into an accident, and the merchant is more concerned about his wine than with the little girl who falls toward a carnivorous plant known as a desert hyacinth. Prior to this point, Ohtaka had already made it clear to the audience just how despicable, arrogant and annoying the wine merchant was, so it really wasn’t a surprise when he acted like this during the accident. Alibaba gives the merchant a much deserved punch, and he jumps toward the plant to save the girl. Aladdin reveals that his turban can be used as a magic carpet, which he uses to dump all of the merchant’s wine to save Alibaba and the girl. Of course, this angers the merchant, and now Alibaba has racked up a debt he has to pay off for the wine that Aladdin took.

We learn that Alibaba want to capture a Dungeon in order to claim its riches in order to pay off his debts and become wealthy. After discovering that Aladdin has a Djinn in his flute, he decides that he needs Aladdin with him in order to have access to the Djinn. However, as the volume progresses, we see that Alibaba does think of Aladdin as more than just someone to have around because of his Djinn. I don’t think you can entirely say they’re friends yet by the end of Volume One, but they seem to be heading in that direction.

The wine merchant makes another appearance in this volume, when he witnesses Aladdin using his Djinn to free a slave, which is against the law. The merchant tries to get Aladdin and Alibaba in trouble with Jamil, the lord of the oasis of Qishan. Fortunately, they manage to get away and make it into the first Dungeon. Their adventure in the dungeon is just getting going as the volume ends.

I have to admit that generally, stories with an Arabian Nights theme tends to not do much for me. However, I was surprised to find that I was enjoying what I was reading in Magi, with the exception of a couple of “fanservice” moments, such as Aladdin nuzzling himself into Sasha’s breasts and Aladdin and Alibaba’s visit to a hostess establishment. There’s no actual nudity shown in these scenes, though, so it’s not as bad of fanservice as it could have been.

When it comes to the art, though, I have to admit that there really isn’t much here to make it stand out to me. The occasional close-up panel may have a little more detail than the rest of the art in the volume, but that’s about it. It’s not that the art is bad, because it isn’t. It’s just that very little jumps out at me as being something that stands out in comparison to other manga that I’ve read.

Magi has an interesting story going for it, even with the average art, so it’s a series I’m definitely willing to try to read more of in the future. If you enjoy stories with an Arabian Nights theme or are set in an ancient Old World setting with magical elements, then you might enjoy reading the Magi manga series.

The reviewer wrote this review after reading a copy of this item that was checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Magi:

VIZ Media Opens December and the Holiday Season With a New Digital Manga Update and Launches Special Sale Promotions

VIZ Media announces extensive digital manga updates along with a trio of new title debuts for the first-half of December. Holiday season announcements include the launch of a special digital manga sale running through the entire month, as well as a digital bundle sale that features special pricing on several popular series. In addition, a new mystery series debuts in Weekly Shonen Jump as part of the Jump Start initiative – Gakkyu Hotei: School Judgment – featuring crazy courtroom battles and amazing art by Takeshi Obata!

Readers can highlight their manga reading with the digital launch of Assassination Classroom, a humorous and action-packed story about a class of misfits who are trying to kill their new teacher – an alien octopus with bizarre powers and super strength! The teacher has just destroyed the moon and is threatening to destroy the earth – unless his students can destroy him first. What makes things more complicated is that he’s the best teacher they’ve ever had!

VIZ Media’s Cyber Monday Sale opened on December 1, 2014 and runs through December 30, 2014 on VIZManga.com and the VIZ Manga App. The sale offers introductory pricing of only $1.99 (U.S. / CAN) on Volumes 1-2 of the following series. Subsequent series volumes will be $4.99 (U.S. / CAN) each.

FOOD WARS, Volumes 1-2 ($1.99 each); Volumes 3-4 ($4.99 each)

JOJO’S BIZARRE ADVENTURE PART 3, Volumes 1-2 ($1.99 each); Volumes 3-15 ($4.99 each)

YUYU HAKUSHO, Volumes 1-2 ($1.99 each); Volumes 3-19 ($4.99 each)

Fans also shouldn’t miss the opportunity to stock up on entire story arcs of several additional popular titles with a special Digital Bundle Sale available on VIZManga.com as well as ComiXology (check the app for specific pricing).

ONE PIECE, East Blue Volumes 1-11; Price: $44.00 (U.S. / CAN) for the entire bundle at $3.99 per volume, usually $6.99 each

NARUTO, (The Test of a Ninja) Volumes 1-16; Price: $64.00 (U.S. / CAN) for the entire bundle at $3.99 per volume, usually $6.99 each

BLEACH, (The Reaper’s Road) Volumes 1-21; Price: $64.00 (U.S. / CAN) for the entire bundle at $3.99 per volume, usually $6.99 each

SHAMAN KING (Spirit Voyage), Vols. 1-15; Price: $60.00 (U.S. / CAN) for the entire bundle at $3.99 per volume, usually $6.99 each

ZOMBIE POWDER, Volumes 1-4; Price: $8.00 (U.S. / CAN) for the entire bundle at $1.99 per volume, usually $6.99 each

Additional December updates include new releases of 14 other VIZ titles, including the riveting series finale of Millennium Snow (Volume 4) as well as the latest volumes of other popular series such as Deadman Wonderland (Volume 6), Seraph of the End (Volume 3), Happy Marriage?! (Volume 9), Magi (Volume 9), Naruto (Volume 68), Toriko (Volume 25) and many more!

The Jump Start Weekly Shonen Jump, publishing the chapter in Weekly Shonen Jump on the same day of that issue’s general print release in Japan. Gakkyu Hotei: School Judgment, written by Nobuaki Enoki with art by Takeshi Obata, asks the question, “Who has time for class when there are cases that needs solving?!”

Readers can enjoy all of these new manga titles that are available on VIZManga.com and the VIZ MANGA App for the iPad®, iPhone® and iPod® touch, Android-powered smart phones and 7” tablets. The titles may also be purchased through the NOOK, Kindle, Kobo, ComiXology, iBooks and Google Play stores. These dynamic digital platforms offer fans the opportunity to explore and enjoy a massive catalog of new and classic manga titles that span more than 2,400 volumes across over 210 different series.

ANSATSU KYOSHITSU © 2012 by Yusei Matsui/SHUEISHA Inc.

GAKKYU HOTEI © 2014 by Nobuaki Enoki, Takeshi Obata/SHUEISHA Inc.