Anime Blu-ray Review: Kimagure Orange Road The Complete OVA Series & Movie

Kimagure Orange Road The Complete OVA Series & Movie is a two-disc set. The first disc includes all eight of the OVAs, and the second disc has the movie, Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day. The release only has Japanese audio with English subtitles.

Kimagure Orange Road The Complete OVA Series & Movie
English Publisher: Discotek Media
Format: Blu-ray
Release Date: August 27, 2019

The eight OVAs included in this set were released between 1989 and 1991. The first OVA, white lovers, sees Kyosuke, Madoka, Hikaru, Kyosuke’s twin sisters, and Hatta and Komatus visiting Kyosuke’s grandparents for a skip trip. The youth are warned about not skiing with the person they’re in love with because of a tragic legend involving two lovers and a supposed curse. Kyosuke and Madoka end up skiing together and discover that there’s truth to the legend. They have to find a way to not have the tragedy repeat again while they find themselves in peril due to the spirit of one of the lovers. While I thought this was kind of an odd story, it does fit in with the feel of the television series, especially since Kyosuke’s family has ESP and supernatural abilities.

The second OVA sees Kyosuke, Madoka, and Hikaru in Hawaii, because Madoka’s parents are performing as part of a concert there. It turns out Hikaru has the same name as the daughter of a wealthy businessman, which makes her the target of a kidnapping scheme. It’s up to Kyosuke and Madoka to save her. When they begin their rescue attempt, Kyosuke makes a comment along the lines of, “This is America. What do we do if they have guns?” I found this particular line to be interesting, especially in the wake of recent mass shootings in America. If this line had been used in a recent anime, it wouldn’t have grabbed me as much. But it did jump out at me, knowing that this OVA was made in the late 1980’s. Did America already have this kind of a gun-toting reputation internationally at that point in time, or was it just a line that was put in here just because?

The third OVA sees Kyosuke’s grandfather coming to visit Kyosuke and his family, and bringing some gifts with him. One of the twins finds a rope, which turns out to have a property of switching people’s bodies if two people touch the ends of the rope. Due to an unfortunate accident, Kyosuke is touching one end of the rope, and the other end touches a goldfish that has been freed by Jingoro, the family cat. Kyosuke (as a fish) falls into a truck that’s passing by and happens to have fish tanks in it. He’s transported to the festival, where goldfish catching is taking place. The race is on to try to find Kyosuke in fish form, and we get to see Kyosuke’s journey from human to fish to cat and back to human again. It’s kind of a silly story, but again, it works for Kimagure Orange Road because of the all of the supernatural elements that are already part of the series.

The fourth OVA introduces, Akane Kasuga, Kyosuke’s cousin, who has the ability to use “The Power” to make people see illusions. With her power, she wreaks havoc by disguising herself as other people. She tries to push Kyosuke and Hikaru together, while at the same time developing a crush on Madoka. This is the first of two appearances that Akane makes in the OVA episodes. I have to admit that I really didn’t care much for Akane as a character. But then again, we only ever got to see her in two OVA episodes. From what I’ve read, Akane was more of a regular character in the manga. I’ve never read the manga, though, so all I have to base her character on are these two OVA appearances. Maybe I’d have a greater appreciation for her if I’d read the manga before watching these OVAs.

The fifth and sixth OVAs are a two-part story that sees a popular male idol singer coming to the area. Hikaru and Kyosuke’s twin sisters are helping to promote his upcoming appearance at a talent contest. Madoka is filling in on keyboards for the band she played with during the television episodes of Kimagure Orange Road. Due to an unfortunate event, Kyosuke and the idol singer end up switching bodies. Kyosuke has to try to figure out how to shake off rabid fans and deal with the pop idol’s old high school female friends. The pop idol, meanwhile, is trying to figure out how to live as a regular teenager again. But through the experience, both of the guys learn important lessons that they take back with them when they’re able to return to their regular bodies. At the contest, Madoka has to step up and do the lead vocals when the main female singer collapses before the performance. I liked getting to hear the song that appears during the second part of this story. This was a story that had to be told in two parts, because there was no way to do it any justice by trying to cram it all into one roughly 20-minute long episode.

“An Unexpected Situation” sees the return to Akane to wreak more havoc on the lives of Kyosuke and his friends. Akane’s friend are trying to pressure her into getting a boyfriend, and she says she already has one. Of course, she fibbed, so she asks Kyosuke to pose as her boyfriend. The two friends aren’t convinced, so they accompany them on dates to try to get “proof” that the two of them are dating. To be honest, this was one of my least favorites of the OVAs that were included in this collection.

In the final OVA, Madoka becomes confused about men when she suspects that her father is having an affair. This story is the one that seems to be the most grounded in reality and doesn’t fall into the trappings of relying heavily on supernatural abilities in order to make the plot work. While most of the OVAs fell into the supernatural trappings, this one really didn’t seem to. This was a nice change of pace.

It should be noted that at some point during there OVAs, there’s a time skip. The OVAs originally start out with the main protagonists still being in middle school, but at some point in the OVAs, the story jumps ahead to Kyosuke and Madoka being in the summer before their second year of high school (which would be the equivalent of the junior year of high school in America). These OVAs serve as a bridge between the 48-episode television anime series and the film, even though they were produced and released after the film. So it would make sense that a timeskip would exist during them, in order to get closer to the time that’s depicted in the film.

One thing I really liked about the OVAs is that after the first one or two, the character of Yusaku Hino disappears from the franchise. He’s the childhood friend of Madoka and Hikaru who was very possessive of Hikaru and served as a kind of romantic rival of Kyosuke. Yusaku always came across as an annoying character, and his obsession with Hikaru was almost toxic. I’m glad that the writers for the OVAs got rid of him very early on in these OVAs. I never liked him as a character, and it never felt like he added anything. He felt more like a “third wheel” than anything else.

The film, Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day, is set during Kyosuke and Madoka’s final year of high school. It tackles Madoka and Kyosuke getting ready for college entrance exams, as well as Hikaru auditioning for a play and hoping to get the lead role. This film sees the love triangle between Kyosuke, Madoka, and Hikaru come to a head, with Kyosuke finally making his choice as to which of the two girls he loves. After telling Hikaru that he’s in love with Madoka and that they shouldn’t see each other anymore, Hikaru doesn’t take it well and becomes clingy… which causes Kyosuke to try to push her away even more. He tries hard to maintain a friendship with her, but her obsession and clinginess make this impossible.

I thought that Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day was a nice way to end the anime franchise, and I thought it overall provided closure for the three main characters and their overarching story. I was glad to see Kyosuke finally make it clear which of the two girls he’s in love with, it was also a little sad to see the friendship between the three main characters fall apart. But this was a realistic way to handle this situation and bring the story of Kimagure Orange Road to a close.

The Blu-ray video for this set has 1.33.1 4:3 / 1080p High Definition for the OVAs, and 1.85.1 16:9 / 1080p High Definition for the movie. The audio is Japanese Linear PCM 2.0 (Dual Mono/Stereo). I had no complaints about either the video or audio quality of this release.

There were a handful of bonus features between the two discs in the set. The first disc includes OVA release promos and theatrical trailers. The second disc includes “Kimagure Talk Special” voice actor reunion, which saw Toru Furuya (the voice of Kyosuke), Hiromi Tsuru (the voice of Madoka), and Eriko Hara (the voice of Hikaru) reuniting and reminiscing about their time recording for Kimagure Orange Road. As I recall, this reunion would have happened in the late 2000’s, so about 10 years before Hiromi Tsuru’s sudden passing in 2017. Seeing this now and knowing that she is no longer alive, I’m glad these three voice actors had this opportunity to get together and reminisce about working on this show. From what they say and how they act, you can tell that these three voice actors enjoyed working on Kimagure Orange Road and have an appreciation for their respective characters. I’m glad Discotek Media decided to include this as a bonus feature on this release.

If you’re a fan of Kimagure Orange Road and want to own the OVA episodes and movie, then I would highly recommend getting Kimagure Orange Road The Complete OVA Series & Movie and adding it to your anime home video library.

Additional posts about Kimagure Orange Road:

Anime Film Review: Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day

Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day is a film released for the Kimagure Orange Road franchise that brings the story to a close.

Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day
Directed by: Tomomi Mochizuki
Written by: Kenji Terada
Starring: Toru Furuya, Hiromi Tsuru, Eriko Hara, Chieko Honda, Michie Tomizawa, Show Hayami, Maria Kawamura, Chiyoko Kawashima, Tomoko Maruo, Keiichi Nanba, Ken’ichi Ogata, Katsumi Suzuki, Naoki Tatsuta, Kei Tomiyama, Koichi Yamadera, and Yusaku Yara
Run Time: 69 minutes

The film opens in black and white and sees Kyosuke and Madoka going to find out if they made it into the college of their choice. As they head toward the listing, Kyosuke overhears someone talking about the drama club, and then can hear Hikaru asking him to see her in a play she’s in. This transitions us to a flashback, which takes up most of the film, with the ending returning to black and white for Madoka and Kyosuke’s visit to the college campus. I thought it was interesting to see the present being animated in black and white, with the flashback in color. But when you consider that the majority of the film is set in the flashback, it makes more sense for the flashback portion of the film to be in color.

The flashback opens at the beginning of Kyosuke and Madoka’s final year of the high school, and the two of them already thinking ahead to college entrance exams. Madoka convinces Kyosuke to sign up for a summer school designed specifically to get students ready for the entrance exams. Hikaru is going to audition for a play and is excited about it, and not recognizing how Kyosuke and Madoka are trying to prepare for exams. However, she wants to try to help Kyosuke, but she serves as more of a distraction than anything else. At one point, when she goes to see Kyosuke, she kisses him and then tells Madoka about it. This causes Madoka to become distant from Kyosuke and not go to the summer school. This event is what brings about the main conflict that persists throughout most of the film.

This film brings the love triangle between Kyosuke, Madoka, and Hikaru to a head. It gets to a point where Madoka demands Kyosuke tell her who he loves. He says that he’s always been in love with Madoka and wants to be with her. I wasn’t surprised that he said this, because while I watched the anime series, I always thought it was clear that he had feelings for Madoka and saw Hikaru more like a little sister. But for whatever reason, he just couldn’t tell Hikaru that he didn’t feel the same way, thus leading her on for a couple of years. But if there hadn’t been that indecisiveness, there wouldn’t have been a manga series to read or an anime series to watch, since this was the overarching story for these characters.

But when Kyosuke finally tells Hikaru that he’s in love with Madoka, she doesn’t want to believe it and doesn’t take it well, especially when he tells her that they shouldn’t see each other anymore. When Hikaru isn’t working on auditioning for the musical, she tries to find ways to see Kyosuke, such as going to his house and bringing him snacks for when he studies. When he forcefully tells her to stop coming to see him, Hikaru starts calling Kyosuke… a lot. He puts up with it at first, but eventually forcefully tells her not to call him anymore. Of course, Hikaru doesn’t take this well, either, and lashes out. Unfortunately, Hikaru just wasn’t picking up on the idea that the more she kept trying to latch onto Kyosuke, the more it was pushing him away. Honestly, I thought Hikaru was being very obsessive and nearly acting psychotic. While I had found Hikaru to be a bit of an annoying character prior to this movie, her actions in this film made me start to truly dislike her. I also found myself thinking that Kyosuke should have been trying to get a restraining order on her, if such a thing was possible in Japan back at the time this film was written and released.

While it’s never blatantly said or shown, the ending of this film seems to hint that Kyosuke and Madoka did ultimately end up together. While Hikaru didn’t get her happy ending with Kyosuke, at least she did get the lead role in the play she was auditioning for. So it’s not like Hikaru entirely got the short end of the stick here. In some respects, it was a little sad to see this group of three friends fall apart, but I was glad to see Kyosuke finally choosing one of the girls after the amount of time that passed over the course of the series.

Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day was a nice way to end the anime franchise, and I thought it overall provided closure for the three main characters and their overarching story. If a viewer wants to see the Kimagure Orange Road franchise, I would highly recommend that they watch this film in addition to the 48 episodes of the television anime series. The eight OVAs are a nice bonus, but they aren’t truly necessary to understanding the overarching story of the series.

Additional post about Kimagure Orange Road:

Anime Blu-ray Review: Kimagure Orange Road The TV Series Collection

Kimagure Orange Road The TV Series Collection is a five-disc set with all 48 episodes of the series included. The release only has Japanese audio with English subtitles.

Kimagure Orange Road The TV Series Collection
English Publisher: Discotek Media
Format: Blu-ray
Release Date: March 26, 2019

The main character of the series is Kyosuke Kasuga, a teenager in his final year of junior high. He and his twin sisters have supernatural powers, and they are forbidden from using their powers in public. The siblings live with their father, who is a photographer, as well as their cat, Jingoro. At the beginning of the series, the family has just moved into a new home after their powers had been discovered for the seventh time.

After starting at his new school, Kyosuke finds himself in a love triangle with Madoka Ayukawa (a beautiful delinquent who’s in his class) and Hikaru Hiyama (a childish girl who is in the same class as Kyosuke’s twin sisters). The love triangle is later made a little messier with the introduction of Yusaku Hino, who is childhood friends with both Madoka and Hikaru. He has feelings for Hikaru, but she is basically oblivious to them.

During the first half of the series, the emphasis is placed on Kyosuke trying not to use his power. Unfortunately, he does use it on occasion, but tries to be very discreet about it. However, at the halfway point, we are introduced to Kyosuke’s five-year-old cousin, Kazuya, who has telepathic ability. At this point, we see Kyosuke using his powers more. While people don’t figure this out, the use of his powers fuels some of the hijinks that Kyosuke endures during the second half of the series. This includes hypnotizing himself and “time slipping” (a kind of time travel).

There’s an interesting concept going into this anime, but it did get a little frustrating how the emphasis on the powers went from trying to not use the power to relying on them as a plot device in order to make stories happen. Something else I noticed about the second half is how the love triangle became less interesting. It became very obvious to the viewer that Kyosuke’s feelings were for Madoka, so more of the stories involved Hikaru walking in on the two of them, misunderstanding the situation, and becoming upset.

I give Kimagure Orange Road credit for the fact that it became an influential anime, especially for the romantic comedy genre. It isn’t a bad anime, but it just didn’t quite the reach the potential that it could have. Even with its faults, I would still recommend that anime viewers expose themselves to this property for its historical importance and to see how it inspired the romantic comedy anime that followed in its footsteps.

The Blu-ray video for this set has 1.33.1 4:3 / 1080p High Definition, while the audio is Japanese Linear PCM 2.0 (Dual Mono). I had no complaints about either the video quality or the audio quality.

The first four discs in the set have ten episodes and one bonus feature (translation notes), and the fifth disc includes eight episodes and the remaining bonus features. The translation notes that appear on each disc seem to be taken from the cards that would have been packaged with AnimEigo’s earlier release of the Kimagure Orange Road anime. The translations notes correspond with the episodes that appear on each disc. There’s a lot to read, but there’s also a lot of interesting facts and trivia included here. I know I learned a lot about this series by reading these notes.

The fifth disc also includes clean versions of all three openings and all three endings. There’s also a collection of TV Broadcast Promos, which ran for about six minutes. Unfortunately, there were quite a few that were very similar (with only minor changes to text or narration), so this feature became monotonous as it went on.

There is also Music Collection OVA: “Their Love Repertory.” This is basically a roughly half-hour feature that takes the various openings, endings, and insert songs and creates “music videos” for each one with footage from the show. However, it was obvious that not all of the songs appeared in their entirety. Some had definitely been edited to be shorter. To be honest, this is a bonus feature that I will likely never watch again. It simply didn’t keep my interest.

The final bonus feature is a Design Works Gallery, which includes promotional art and character model sheets for Kimagure Orange Road. This is a gallery where the viewer uses their remote to flip through the various pieces of art in the gallery.

I would definitely recommend Kimagure Orange Road The TV Series Collection to viewers who are fans of the series and want to add this classic title to their anime home video library.

Additional post about Kimagure Orange Road:

Anime Spotlight: Kimagure Orange Road

Kimagure Orange Road is an anime based on a manga by Izumi Matsumoto. The anime was directed by Osamu Kobayashi and was produced by Pierrot. The 48 episodes of the anime series aired on Japanese television from April 6, 1987-March 7, 1988. An anime film was released on October 1, 1988, eight OVAs were released between February 15, 1989 and January 18, 1991, and a second anime film was released on November 2, 1996. As of this writing, Discotek Media holds the North American license for the Kimagure Orange Road anime.

The main character of the series is Kyosuke Kasuga, a teenager in his final year of junior high. He and his twin sisters have supernatural powers, and they are forbidden from using their powers in public. The siblings live with their father, who is a photographer, as well as their cat, Jingoro. At the beginning of the series, the family has just moved into a new home after their powers had been discovered for the seventh time. While exploring his new neighborhood, Kyosuke meets a pretty girl who gives him her straw hat… and he falls in love with her at first sight.

When he starts his first day in his new class, he meets two boys named Seiji Komatsu and Kazuya Hatta. They’re both sex obsessed and bumblers, and they develop an interest in Manami and Kurumi, Kyosuke’s younger twin sisters. He also discovers that the girl he met is in his class and that her name is Madoka Ayukawa. It turns out, though, that she’s a delinquent. But as Madoka spends time around Kyosuke, Madoka starts showing more of a softer side.

However, things become complicated for Kyosuke. Hikaru Hiyama, a tough talking girl in Manami and Kurumi’s class, becomes entangled in his life when he accidentally kisses her while running away. This leads her to believe that he’s in love with her, and she starts calling him “Darling.” It turns out Hikaru isn’t as tough as she was initially portrayed. In fact, after she’s around Kyosuke, she starts acting more child-like.

This is the initial setup for the love triangle that persists throughout the series. Kyosuke is depicted as being indecisive, which explains why the love triangle persists. While Kyosuke cares about Hikaru, he cares about her more like an older brother than as a boyfriend. It’s made very clear throughout the series that Kyosuke has feelings for Madoka. The love triangle is later made a little messier with the introduction of Yusaku Hino, who is childhood friends with both Madoka and Hikaru. He has feelings for Hikaru, but she is basically oblivious to them. Yusaku views Kyosuke as a romantic rival and strongly dislikes him.

During the first half of the series, the emphasis is placed on Kyosuke trying not to use his power. Unfortunately, he does use it on occasion, but tries to be very discreet about it. However, at the halfway point, we are introduced to Kyosuke’s five-year-old cousin, Kazuya, who has telepathic ability. At this point, we see Kyosuke using his powers more. While people don’t figure this out, the use of his powers fuels some of the hijinks that Kyosuke endures during the second half of the series. This includes hypnotizing himself and “time slipping” (a kind of time travel).

There’s an interesting concept going into this anime, but it did get a little frustrating how the emphasis on the powers went from trying to not use the power to relying on them as a plot device in order to make stories happen. I was also torn about the addition of Kazuya. Right at first, he seemed like he would add an interesting layer, but after a while he became more of a distraction than anything else.

Something else I noticed about the second half is how the love triangle became less interesting. It became very obvious to the viewer that Kyosuke’s feelings were for Madoka, so more of the stories involved Hikaru walking in on the two of them, misunderstanding the situation, and becoming upset. I have to admit that after a while, Hikaru started grating on my nerves more and more as the series neared its conclusion.

When it came to character development, Madoka was the strongest. Kyosuke came in a close second. Hikaru, however, never really develops as a character, so she comes across feeling forced and fake at the end.

It should be noted that the story isn’t over at the end of the television anime series. In order to find out how the story ends, you have to see the Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day anime film.

Overall, the animation was pretty good for its time. However, there was one episode that stood out… in a bad way. In was an episode early on in the series’ run, and it looked like Pierrot had brought in their C or D-Team to animate parts of that particular episode. There were a few scenes where characters were off model. Fortunately, it was only that one episode that had any real issues with the animation.

Shiro Sagisu, who is also known for composing the score for the Neon Genesis Evangelion anime, also composed the score for Kimagure Orange Road. The score for this series is excellent and is the quality I would expect from Shiro Sagisu. The opening and ending themes, as well as the insert songs, were also well done. According to the translation notes in the Blu-ray bonus features, it mentions that these songs were written by some impressive Japanese songwriters.

I will give Kimagure Orange Road credit for the fact that it became an influential anime, especially for the romantic comedy genre. I read somewhere that the character of Madoka can be considered the “root” for the tsundere character type, and I can definitely see that in her. I also read that the stories in the anime are loosely based on their manga counterparts, so it’s possible that I might enjoy the manga more than the anime.

Kimagure Orange Road isn’t a bad anime, but it just didn’t quite the reach the potential that it could have. Even with its faults, I would still recommend that anime viewers expose themselves to this property for its historical importance and to see how it inspired the romantic comedy anime that followed in its footsteps.

Additional post about Kimagure Orange Road:

RetroCrush Announces Debuts for November 2020

Digital Media Rights has announced that it has licensed eight new anime titles for its RetroCrush streaming service. The company also announced the release dates for the anime titles that will stream on its RetroCrush streaming service in November 2020.

The titles will launch on consecutive Fridays in November 2020:

  • GoShogun: The Time Étranger – November 6, 2020
  • Kite: Liberator – November 6, 2020
  • Dragon Half – November 13, 2020
  • Yamibo – Darkness, the Hat, and the Travelers of the Books – November 13, 2020
  • Kimagure Orange Road – November 20, 2020
  • Kimagure Orange Road OAV – November 20, 2020
  • Kimagure Orange Road: The Movie – November 20, 2020
  • Cyborg 009 The Cyborg Soldier – November 20, 2020

Kite: Liberator will stream with an English dub only. The three Kimagure Orange Road anime will stream in Japanese with English subtitles. GoShogun: The Time Étranger, Dragon Half, Yamibo – Darkness, the Hat, and the Travelers of the Books, and Cyborg 009 The Cyborg Soldier will be available both with an English dub and subtitles.

RetroCrush is a free, ad-supported video-on-demand service available in the United States and Canada. The service has apps on iOS, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Roku, Apple TV, and smart TVs, in addition to being available on browsers. The service launched in March 2020.

Source: ANN

Crunchyroll Has Added Two More Anime Titles to Its Streaming Catalog

Crunchyroll has announced that it has added the Bludgeoning Angel Dokuro-chan and Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day anime to its catalog. Both anime began streaming in the United States and Canada on August 2, 2019.

Bludgeoning Angel Dokuro-chan is based on Masaki Okayu’s novel series. An eight-episode series of shorts aired in 2005, and then the Bokusatsu Tenshi Dokuro-chan Second OAV with four episodes launched in 2007.

Kimagure Orange Road: I Want to Return to That Day debuted in 1988 as a sequel of the 1987 Kimagure Orange Road television anime series.

Source: ANN

Crunchyroll Announces Four More Additions to Its Streaming Anime Catalog

Crunchyroll has announced that it has added the following anime to its streaming catalog:

  • Kimagure Orange Road (TV series and OVA)
  • Photon: The Idiot Adventures
  • Psybuster
  • The Adventures of the Little Prince

Psybuster, The Adventures of the Little Prince, and Kimagure Orange Road are available in the United States and Canada. Photon: The Idiot Adventures is available in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, and Iceland.

Photon: The Idiot Adventures and Psybuster are available with both an English dub and English subtitles.

Source: ANN

Discotek Media’s Announcements at Otakon 2018

Discotek Media has announced at Otakon that the company has acquired the following anime licenses:

  • Giant Robo OVA
  • Area 88 OVA
  • Lupin the 3rd: Blood Seal of the Eternal Mermaid film
  • Kimagure Orange Road
  • Galaxy Express 999
  • Psycho Armor Govarian
  • Bo-Bobo-Bo-Bobo-bo
  • Space Warriors Baldios
  • Voltes V
  • God Mars

Discotek will release all seven episodes of the 1992 Giant Robo OVA on Blu-ray Disc, in HD with Japanese audio, subtitles, and both English dubs. The release will also include the Gin Rei OVA.

The company will release Kimagure Orange Road in two Blu-ray Disc sets, one covering the television series and one covering the OVAs and finale movie. Both will be in Japanese with subtitles.

Discotek will release the Galaxy Express 999 television anime in three Blu-ray Disc sets. The show will be in Japanese with subtitles. It is an upscale, but not the same upscale that was released in Japan. Discotek said that its version “preserves more detail and film grain.”

The company will release Bo-Bobo-Bo-Bobo-bo as a standard definition Blu-ray Disc set that includes all 76 episodes both in English and in Japanese with subtitles.

Discotek will release the Lupin the 3rd: Blood Seal of the Eternal Mermaid (Lupin III: Chi no Kokuin Eien no Mermaid) television movie on Blu-ray Disc, and it will include both Japanese with subtitles and a brand new English dub featuring the cast of the Lupin III television series

The company will release the Psycho Armor Govarian television anime in a standard definition Blu-ray Disc collection that includes all 26 episodes in Japanese with English subtitles.

Discotek Media will release the entire Space Warrior Baldios television anime series on Blu-ray Disc in Japanese with English subtitles.

The Voltes V television anime will ship as a standard definition Blu-ray Disc release, and will include the entire series in Japanese with subtitles.

Discotek will release the God Mars science-fiction television anime as two standard-definition Blu-ray Discs. The complete collection includes the entire 64-episode series, the movie retelling, and the OVA sequel God Mars: The Untold Legend in Japanese with subtitles.

Discotek will release the Area 88 OVA on DVD. The DVD includes the three-part OVA, as well as the theatrical cut of the first two parts (the third part was the same in both its theatrical and home video release). It will be in Japanese with subtitles and dubbed in English. Extras includes detailed liner notes, the original Central Park Media dub of the first episode, and the ADV dub for the movie versions.

Source: ANN

Digital Manga Launches Kickstarter For Kimagure Orange Road Manga

Digital Manga Inc. has launched a Kickstarter campaign to publish Izumi Matsumoto’s Kimagure Orange Road romantic comedy manga in 3-in-1 omnibus form. Digital Manga Inc. plans to re-translate, re-edit, and re-letter the series.

Digital Manga Inc.’s initial goal of US$34,900 will be to publish the first omnibus volume, and the other five omnibus volumes will be stretch goals at the following amounts:

  • Omnibus volume 2: US$56,900
  • Omnibus volume 3: US$74,900
  • Omnibus volume 4: US$89,900
  • Omnibus volume 5: US$105,900
  • Omnibus volume 6: US$119,900

Backer tiers range from US$1 to US$1,500, and rewards include: digital or print editions of the manga, bookmarker magnets, a pub glass, USB drives, beach towels, sunglasses, eco bags, wall scrolls, signed soundtrack CDs, stickers, reproduction prints, reproduction shikishi boards, posters, and an artbook.

The campaign will end on May 10, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. EDT. As of this writing, the campaign has raised US$18,387.

Source: ANN