Fw:Hamatora Compilation Anime Film to Open in Japan on November 14, 2015

Avex Pictures is now streaming a theatrical preview to announce the Fw:Hamatora anime film. The film will open in Japanese theaters on November 14, 2015, and it will compile the 24 episodes of Hamatora and Re:_Hamatora with new additional narration by the characters Nice and Murasaki. The film screening will also include a completely original SD anime film Gekijōban Mini Hama (Minimum Hamatora Film Version).

The film will screen in four theaters in Japan for two weeks. Tickets go on sale on October 31, 2015.

The Mini Hama anime will also air as a series on AT-X and dTV. The show will premiere on dTV on November 1, 2015, and on AT-X on November 2, 2015. The film and the series will both feature the same voice cast as the previous two Hamatora anime series. Mini Hama follows the characters from the series at the private “Hamatora Academy.” Lerche is producing the film and series’ animation.

Hatano is singing the theme song “Rolling life” for the Fw:Hamatora part of the film, and Hatano and Ohsaka are singing the “Little Crazy” theme song for the Gekijōban Mini Hama part of the film. The two songs will ship on a HAMATORACKS CD on December 23, 2015.

Source: ANN

English Cast for Hamatora

Sentai Filmworks has announced the English voice cast for Hamatora:

  • Adam Gibbs is Nice
  • David Wald is Murasaki
  • Leraldo Anzaldua is Art
  • Nancy Novotny is Koneko
  • Blake Shepard is Birthday
  • Andrew Love is Ratio
  • Christina Kelly is Hajime
  • Carl Masterson is Master
  • Margaret McDonald is Honey
  • George Manley is Three
  • Luis Galindo is Gasuke
  • Mike Yager is Mao
  • Chris Patton is Moral
  • Carli Mosier is Momoka
  • Greg Ayres is Theo
  • Juliet Simmons is Rei
  • David Harlan is Edogawa
  • Rob Mungle is Weight
  • Cara Duncan is Azusa<>/li>
  • Clint Bickham is Young Master
  • Tiffany Grant is Head Maid
  • Houston Hayes is Kitizawa
  • Scott Gibbs is Kojima
  • Gabriel Regojo is The Outsider/Takahiro
  • Shelley Calene-Black is Itou
  • Luke Patterson is Yajuta
  • Jay Hickman is Nakada
  • Allison Sumrall is Minowa
  • Jay Hickman is Arata
  • Gabriel Regojo is Prince
  • Kasi Hollowell is Chiyuu
  • Katelyn Barr is Misty
  • Houston Hayes is Nashihara
  • Clint Bickham is Shiratori
  • Scott Gibbs is Aragaki
  • Ned Gayle is Ooki
  • Ty Mahany is Shuujii
  • Luke Patterson is Shuuichi
  • Mark X Laskowski is Karasawa
  • Allison Sumrall is Nel
  • John Swasey is Masayoshi
  • Joel McCray is Wakabayshi

Chris Ayres is directing.

Sentai Filmworks will release Hamatora on Blu-ray and DVD on September 22, 2015.

Source: ANN

Sentai Filmworks Licenses Hamatora

Sentai Filmworks has announced that the company has acquired the license the Hamatora anime series. The company plans to release the series digitally and on home video.

The multimedia Hamatora project was announced in 2013, and it has spawned a manga series, two stage plays, and a Nintendo 3DS game by FuRyu. Crunchyroll simulcast the anime and the sequel series, Re:␣Hamatora, as they aired in Japan.

Source: ANN

2014 In Review: Winter 2014 Season

Over the next few days, I’ll be publishing posts looking back at 2014. This first post takes a look back at the shows that I started watching during the Winter 2014 season. This post will also include series that I started watching in the Fall 2013 season that were still running with Winter 2014 started.

Log Horizon: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. This was a series that I admit to not being sure about when it first started in October 2013, but fortunately, I stuck with it and was rewarded with a series that made itself stand out from other anime series about characters who get stuck in a video game. I fell in love with this series by the time it finished airing in March 2014, and was overjoyed when the end of the final episode announced that there would be a second season that would begin airing in Fall 2014. I spent a lot of the year eagerly anticipating the second season because the first season had built such a strong foundation for the characters and their story.

Noragami: Noragami ended up being a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed the first four episodes, but then with Episode Five, I started feeling like the series wasn’t as strong as it was when it first started. My opinion improved a bit with Episode Six, and it kept improving through Episode 11. However, I was never entirely sure how I felt about Episode 12, because I couldn’t tell if it was meant to be a series finale or a season finale. As of this writing, there has been no word about a second season for Noragami, so I have to believe this was meant as a series finale. Unfortunately, there were enough loose ends that were left hanging which made it an unsatisfying note to end a series on. The manga for Noragami started being published during 2014, so I may need to start reading it at some point  and see if it might improve my opinion of the series.

Tokyo Ravens: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. When I first watched this series, I thought it had a slow start; however, enough elements were established in the first episode to interest me enough to come back to see more. With the second episode, I felt it was a little heavy on the “info dumping” side, but I was still willing to come back because the story that was developing showed a lot of promise. By the time I hit episode five, I found myself genuinely interested in Tokyo Ravens and decided that I’d see it through until the end. I ended up being interested in Tokyo Ravens for most of its 24 episode run; unfortunately, I started becoming a little disappointed in the series after a particular plot twist in Episode 23. I also ended up feeling rather let down and disappointed with how the final episode ended. FUNimation Entertainment, who had streamed the series as a simulcast, has recently announced that it has acquired the home video rights for Tokyo Ravens; unfortunately, I have no plans to purchase their release to add it to my anime home video library because of my disappointment with the final two episodes of the series.

D-Frag!: This is an anime I watched because the previews made it look like it’d be really hilarious. While there was humor in the first episode, there wasn’t as much as I had expected. And from humor I did see in the episode, I saw the potential for the series to rely on the same gags every week; unfortunately, I ended up being right with that assumption. And the gags that the series relied so heavily upon weren’t terribly funny the first time they showed up, and they wore out their welcome rather quickly. With episode two, I saw that maybe D-Frag! had potential with its story, but sadly, that potential never materialized. It also didn’t help that the series already started feeling stagnant by Episode Four. When I reached the halfway point, I decided I’d stick it out, but that the second half of the series really couldn’t go fast enough for my taste. The final episode didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress had been made on the loose threads that were out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes earlier. And the final episode was the worst of the drudgery that I saw for that show. After that episode ended, all I could think was, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!”

Yowamushi Pedal: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. After watching the first episode, I thought I could see some potential in the series. Even though I’m not a fan of cycling, I found myself getting hooked on Yowamushi Pedal the more I watched of it. I especially found myself being riveted to the action that takes place during the racing scenes. I also liked how the characters developed over the course of the series. The main focus of the first half was on developing the members of the Sohoku team, with occasional development on members of the other two teams. However, the development for the other two teams tended to take place during the Inter-High race. The main selling point of this series to me ended up being the characters and the development they go through. While the pacing of Yowamushi Pedal was pretty typical for a shonen sports anime, it’s something I got used to with each race that appeared in the series. I was happy to hear that there would be a second season for the series in Fall 2014, especially since this season ended before the winner of the second day of the Inter-High was determined.

Hamatora: After watching the first episode of Hamatora, I felt that the series showed a bit of promise; however, I was little turned off by the character of Hajime, because it appeared her gluttony was going to be a major source of humor for the series. It turns out we learn later on why Hajime is such a glutton, and it also turned out that there was more in the way of humor than just Hajime’s gluttony. It was ultimately the second episode that sold me on Hamatora. I enjoyed seeing the various mysteries that came Hamatora’s way, and how several of the episodes were able to take what appeared to be two unrelated plots and find a way to weave the two together rather successfully by the end. Overall, I enjoyed the series except for Episode Five and Episode Eight. But when I saw that there was a cliffhanger ending and that there would be another season of Hamatora coming in the future, I was looking forward to seeing more episodes in order to find out how the story continued from the cliffhanger.

Nagi no Asukara: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that after watching the first episode, I had some mixed feelings. On the one hand, I kind of liked the story, although I was finding Hikari to be a bit on the annoying side. However, I was having problems with using my willing suspension of disbelief about people being able to live underwater; it turns out that the concept of Ena, which allows them to breathe underwater, hadn’t been properly introduced by the end of the first episode. I decided to continue watching the series, and went into the second episode using my willing suspension of disbelief and focusing on the storytelling. It’s a decision I’m glad I made, because I found myself being more impressed with the series and becoming genuinely interested in the characters and their stories. I’d become so riveted with the series that when the first half reached its climax with the Ofunehiki, I was a little frustrated that I had to wait two weeks in order to find out what happened. When the second half of the series started, I have to admit that it was a bit of an adjustment to get used to the fact that a five-year timeskip had happened between the two episodes and that some of the cast members were noticeably older. I appreciated how there was a focus on the confusion for both those who returned from the surface after a five-year hibernation and those who stayed on the surface and aged five years. There’s a lot of raw emotion that’s prevalent in the second half of the series, but I found these emotions and reactions to be believable. I have to admit that for the most part, I had basically predicted what directions the various relationships would go in. However, I still found the conclusion of the series to be satisfying and enjoyable.

Samurai Flamenco: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. At the end of the first episode, I thought that between the animation and the storytelling, there seemed to be enough there to keep my interest and make me want to come back week after week to watch more of Samurai Flamenco. I have to admit that when the King Torture arc was introduced and caused the major tonal shift for the series, I wasn’t entirely sure that I liked it. It didn’t help that it was also at that point that the animation quality went down noticeably, and that “off model” shots started becoming more prevalent and noticeable. By the end of the King Torture, arc, though, I had become so accustomed to the change in tone that I started enjoying the series a bit more again. Overall, though, I did enjoy Samurai Flamenco when all was said and done.

Magical Warfare: After watching the first episode, I thought the series had some potential. After the second episode, I thought it plodded a bit due all of the exposition included, but I still thought that the overall concept still showed promise. At the end of episode three, I said that while Magical Warfare wasn’t one of my favorite series of Winter 2014, I couldn’t say that it was the worst one I was watching, either. By the end of episode four, I was already at a point where I wasn’t looking forward to watching the series week after week. As the series continued to progress, I became frustrated with how the series was paced, the fact that the villains weren’t very well defined by the halfway point of the series, and how the character development wasn’t where it needed to be for me to truly care about these characters. The final episode was a major letdown, due to how little was explained for what was happening throughout it. The ending of the final episode was so vague that the viewer was left having to make a lot of assumptions just to figure out what the heck was going on. Honestly, the way Magical Warfare ended was just so vague and bizarre that it makes the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion seem like it makes sense. And considering the reputation the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion has, it’s really saying something. All in all, I have to say that Magical Warfare ended up being a steaming pile of poo and I think it was easily one of the worst series I watched during 2014.

Strike the Blood: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that I wasn’t entirely sure about Strike the Blood after watching the first episode, but I decided to give it a chance and continue watching it. After watching the second episode, though, I was more impressed with the series than I thought I’d be. The cliffhanger ending for episode three ultimately sold me on the series. As the series progressed through the various story arcs, more characters were introduced. Most of them seemed to have an importance to the series, although there were a couple of characters who were only truly important for one or two story arcs, and then basically all but vanished from the series. After making it through all 24 episodes of Strike the Blood, I have to say that overall, I was satisfied with how the series progressed and ultimately came to its conclusion. It was a series I came to look forward to watching.

Wizard Barristers: At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series. By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. The viewer was left with the responsibility of assuming what happens.

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha: I have to admit that at the end of the first episode, I wasn’t entirely sure if I was going to like Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha. However, I decided to keep watching to see if the story would improve. After finishing episode two, my opinion of the series started becoming more favorable. As the episodes went on, I continued to enjoy the series more and more; I’m so glad I didn’t let my initial unsure impression keep me away from this series. Overall, I thought the series was good, although the last couple of episodes felt a bit rushed compared to the other episodes; I have to say that Episode 10 had more issues with being rushed than Episode Nine did.  The action in the first half of Episode 10 felt stretched out, and then the story in the second half ended up feeling rushed. In the final episode, I appreciated the fact that it demonstrated just how much Inari has grown as a character over the course of the series. In a lot of ways, when Inari returned Uka’s divine power at the end of Episode 10, it symbolizes that Inari had grown up and no longer needs the “crutch” that she thought the power was giving her. In a lot of respects, though, there is some vagueness at the end of the final episode. Do Inari and Koji ever end up together? Is Touka still able to see Uka even though Inari no longer can? It appears that the manga series is still ongoing in Japan, so that might explain why the ending of the anime is a bit ambiguous.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

Hamatora Anime Returning in Summer 2014

It has been confirmed that the Hamatora television anime series will be returning to Japanese television in July 2014, and that new episodes will be broadcast under the title, Re:_Hamatora.

Seiji Kishi will be directing Re:_Hamatora, and Masaomi Ando will be the assistant director. Chief animation director Keiko Kurosawa joins Yuu Wazu on character design. Lerche takes over the production.

Source: ANN

Anime Spotlight: Hamatora

Hamatora is an anime produced by Naz and directed by Seiji Kishi and Hiroshi Kimura. The series aired on Japanese television from January 7-March 25, 2014. As of this writing, Sentai Filmworks holds the North American rights for the series.

Hamatora is set in Yokohama in 2014. In the world of this series, humans with supernatural abilities have been discovered; they are referred to as Minimum Holders. Two Minimum Holders named Nice and Murasaki have formed a detective agency called Hamatora, and they rent out a table at the Nowhere Café and call it their office. Their friends, Birthday and Ratio, who are also Minimum Holders, are also part of the Hamatora team.

Nice and Murasaki have a friend named Art, who is the superintendent of the Yokohama Police Department. Art is investigating a string of serial murders, and the murderer’s sole target is Minimum Holders. Art asks for Honey and Three to assist him on the case; both characters are Minimum Holders.

It’s revealed during the series that several of the Minimum Holder characters were students at Facultas Academy, which is a place that trains Minimum Holders to develop their potential. We also learn that Nice was the top graduate of the academy, with Murasaki being the second top graduate.

Art discovers that the suspect in the serial murders is Moral, a former professor at Facultas Academy. His motive is to give everyone Minimums in order to achieve equality. In order to do this, he had to kill several Minimum Holders and use their brains to unlock the Minimums. It’s up to Art and to Hamatora to try to stop Moral before he can succeed with his plan.

After watching the first episode of Hamatora, I felt that the series showed a bit of promise. However, I was little turned off by the character of Hajime, because it appeared her gluttony was going to be a major source of humor for the series. It turns out we learn why Hajime is such a glutton, and that there was more in the way of humor than just Hajime’s gluttony.

The second episode ultimately sold me on Hamatora. I enjoyed seeing the various mysteries that came Hamatora’s way, and how several of the episodes were able to take what appeared to be two unrelated plots and find a way to weave the two together rather successfully by the end.

Overall, I enjoyed the series, although I thought that episode five was on the strange side (this is the episode that takes place in a hot spring with the guy who had a Minimum that made people fall in love with him). The only other episode that I didn’t entirely enjoy was Episode 8; that’s the one where Nice and Murasaki take an assignment which leads them to Okinawa and they find themselves in a triathlon competition that arises between two high schools.

Overall, I enjoyed Hamatora quite a bit, even with this season having a “WTF?” ending. It’s been my favorite of the six new shows I started during Winter 2014, and for the most part, I don’t see that any of the remaining three Winter 2014 series I have yet to complete will beat Hamatora out.

Additional post about Hamatora:

Hamatora: Episode 12 – “File 12: Resolve (Ego)”

Hamatora is set in Yokohama in 2014. In the world of this series, humans with supernatural abilities have been discovered; they are referred to as Minimum Holders. Two Minimum Holders named Nice and Murasaki have formed a detective agency called Hamatora, and they rent out a table at the Nowhere Café and call it their office.

A lot of this episode focuses on Moral and Nice. Before getting onto a boat and meeting up with Nice, Moral injects something into his neck. When they meet, Nice activates his Minimum and tries to attack Moral; unfortunately, Moral has gained the power of teleportation and is able to move out of Nice’s way. We learn that Moral has the Type 0 Minimum, which he claims is power that is said to be akin to being a god.

Moral then goes on and on with his long-winded speeches, which includes him going on and on about the plan that he’s going to launch once the boat reaches its destination. At one point, Moral mentions Art’s death and how insignificant it was. When the battle reaches its climax, Nice finds a way to keep up with Moral and gets a rather impressive blow in on him.

After Moral falls to the ground, he starts vomiting up blood. Art suddenly appears and chides Moral for trying to possess two Minimum abilities. And with this, Art shoots and kills Moral. After Nice asks Art if he really needed to kill Moral, Art does something very unexpected… which ends the episode on a major cliffhanger.

I have to say that the ending of this episode made me go, “WTF just happened?” Art’s sudden reappearance from the dead without any explanation was puzzling in and of itself, but then Art’s final action to end the episode just compounded the confusion at the end.

Fortunately, there’s a short bit after the ending credits that says Hamatora is to be continued. Unfortunately, there’s been no word as to when a second season will air. While I’m grateful to know that more episodes will be coming so the series doesn’t end on such a cliffhanger, I wish I knew when I can expect to hopefully get some answers as to what exactly took place at the end of Episode 12.

Overall, I enjoyed Hamatora quite a bit, even with this season having a “WTF?” ending. It’s been my favorite of the six new shows I started during Winter 2014, and for the most part, I don’t see that any of the remaining three Winter 2014 series I have yet to complete will beat Hamatora out.

Additional posts about Hamatora:

Hamatora: Episode 11 – “File 11: Flight of the Victor”

Hamatora is set in Yokohama in 2014. In the world of this series, humans with supernatural abilities have been discovered; they are referred to as Minimum Holders. Two Minimum Holders named Nice and Murasaki have formed a detective agency called Hamatora, and they rent out a table at the Nowhere Café and call it their office.

At the beginning of the episode, Nice and Moral arrive at the Nowhere Café and sit down to have drinks. Quite a bit of the episode takes place here, with Moral explaining to Nice why he’s been doing the things that he’s been doing. After Moral explains that he’s trying to save Nice from his loneliness, Nice begins laughing and tells him that he never asked for Moral to save him. This leads to a confrontation that ends with Moral holding Koneko hostage.

Murasaki, Hajime, and Takahiro are involved in the other major portion of the episode. First. Murasaki finds himself fighting against other Minimum Holders who are rioting; however, after the rioters start going to the civic center and going after Director Itoh from the Association for the Health, Protection, and Equality of Youths, Takahiro goes to try to save his mother. Takahiro, with help with Murasaki, Hajime, and eventually Nice, are able to quell the rioters. However, after it appears that Director Itoh will finally be able to reconcile with her son, Moral does something really despicable. Moral’s actions piss off both Nice and Hajime, and it appears that this will set the scene for Episode 12.

In addition to these two plots, there are also occasional references to Birthday and Ratio with Chiyuu at the hospital and to Three and Honey; however, the other two plots took up the majority of the episode. The intercutting between the various story plots illustrates just how hectic and dangerous that Yokohama has become because of Moral’s actions.

I haven’t liked Moral since he was first introduced, but by the end of episode 11, I came to really dislike this character. He’s just so out of touch with reality and has such a god complex, that it’s rather sickening. At this point, I want to see Moral taken down, and taken down hard in episode 12!

The intensity of the episode, as well as the actions that take place during this episode, make it clear that the series is about to reach its climactic conclusion. After seeing episode 11, I’m very intrigued about how the writers for Hamatora will ultimately bring the series to a close. I really hope that I don’t end up being disappointed, because the stage has really been set for the series to potentially have an epic ending.

Additional posts about Hamatora:

Hamatora: Episode 10 – “File 10: March of the Weak”

Hamatora is set in Yokohama in 2014. In the world of this series, humans with supernatural abilities have been discovered; they are referred to as Minimum Holders. Two Minimum Holders named Nice and Murasaki have formed a detective agency called Hamatora, and they rent out a table at the Nowhere Café and call it their office.

At the beginning of the episode, Takahiro, the boy who Professor Moral turned into a creature earlier in the series, approaches Hamatora. He says his mind and his voice have returned, but he would like to have Hamatora help him find a way to return his body to normal. Nice has no interest, but Murasaki says he’ll take this on without Nice’s help.

Meanwhile, information about the Minimum Holders has suddenly become public, including a register of all former students of Facultas Academy. The Minimum Holders find themselves being discriminated against, and this especially causes problems for Three and Honey as they’re trying to run the orphanage. Later, Takahiro’s mother, along with other members of the association for the Health, Protection, and Equality of Youths, get permission from the authorities to take the children out of their custody. When this scene was going on, I swear that I really wished I could bitch slap Takahiro’s mother, due to her attitude and the fact that she was taking these kids away.

Moral, along with his florist accomplice, begin the next phase of the plan. Whenever someone posts something disparaging about the Minimum Holders online, a link that shows a map of the commenter’s house suddenly appears. Minimum Holders use these maps to track down the commenters and do various things, such as slapping them with lawsuits, setting houses on fire, etc.

We also see Nice trying to contact Art again, but still not getting a hold of him. When he finally goes to visit Art, he’s not there; however, Nice notices something that shouldn’t be there and runs out. At the end of the episode, Nice has a very unexpected encounter…

One of the things that really stood out to me in this episode is the “man on the street” interviews that the media is doing about people’s feelings on the Minimum Holders. As expected, there’s a wide range of responses: they’re people just like us and I don’t hate them for their powers, wondering if they’re like monsters, they didn’t want to be that way so they shouldn’t be discriminated against, they’re all freaks, etc. The most interesting response, though, comes from Nice when he gets a microphone and camera shoved into his face. To me, this section of the episode felt very realistic, because these are the same kinds of reactions people in the real world would give if they were sharing their opinions on something that is unknown and foreign to them.

Episode 10 definitely raises the stakes for the characters, and it’s obvious at this point that the series is just about to reach its climax.

I can’t believe that Hamatora is almost over, too. I’ll be watching the remaining episodes in order to see how the series will ultimately be brought to its end, and to see whether or not there are any more unexpected surprises in store.

Additional posts about Hamatora:

Hamatora: Episode 9 – “File 09: Little Beauty and the Beast”

Hamatora is set in Yokohama in 2014. In the world of this series, humans with supernatural abilities have been discovered; they are referred to as Minimum Holders. Two Minimum Holders named Nice and Murasaki have formed a detective agency called Hamatora, and they rent out a table at the Nowhere Café and call it their office.

Episode nine sees Professor Moral, disguised as Art, removing Three and Honey from the Professor Moral case. However, most of the episode focuses on providing backstory for Three. We learn that he used to be a mercenary known as the Bloody Beast, and that he had killed people. However, he now runs an orphanage in Japan, where he raises the kids of the people he killed; he teaches them that it is not a sin to exact vengeance on those who attack you, try to take something away from you, or took something from you. He expects that once the children are older and learn who killed their families, that they will want to exact their revenge on him.

A client comes to see Hamatora about investigating Three, and that’s how a lot of this information comes to light. This was a very well-done story, and I found myself feeling a bit emotional as Three’s storyline played out.

Mixed in with this is Nice trying to find who’s been profiting online lately, since that’s how Professor Moral’s crimes work. We see him investigating a florist, and Nice thinks he may be on to something. The audience, however, learns that Nice was indeed on the right track, and that the florist does have a connection with Professor Moral.

Right at the end of the episode, it appears that Moral is finally putting his plan in motion. From seeing the title for the next episode, it appears that Moral’s plan will be the focus of episode 10.

So it looks like episode eight was meant to be an overall light-hearted episode before hitting the intensity of episode nine. And knowing we’re so close to the end of the series, I suspect the remaining episodes are also going to be intense. This increase in intensity reinforces the idea that the series is getting closer to reaching its climax.

It’s hard to believe that Hamatora is getting closer to reaching its conclusion. With a couple of exceptions, I think at this point that it’s been a rather solid and consistent series. I look forward to watching Hamatora each week, and I’ll miss the series when it’s finished.

Additional posts about Hamatora: