Case Closed: Episode 1044 – “The Deadly Pork Soup Signal”

The episode opens with Kogoro and Conan walking down the street, and Kogoro mentioning that Megure has commented about how often the two of them just happen to come across their police investigations. And guess what? Just then, Kogoro and Conan come across an investigation.

This time, a woman has been murdered inside her apartment. Takagi and Chiba are investigating, and they fill Kogoro and Conan in on what they’ve found so far, which includes three sets of fingerprints that don’t belong to the victim. First, they talk to the woman’s boyfriend, whose fingerprints were found at the murder scene. It turns out he has an alibi for the time of the murder. However, the boyfriend mentions that his girlfriend’s boss has been making advances on her that she’s been rejecting and he suggests checking the boss out.

So Takagi, Chiba, Kogoro, and Conan visit the victim’s boss, and it turns out his fingerprints were also at the crime scene. From the moment they begin questioning this man, he just came across with a vibe that I just didn’t trust him. This became especially true after he was being so flippant with the police and accusing them of needing to spend time on more important matters like investigating particular pieces of evidence at the scene. He was so specific, it was like he knew more than he should have. It turns out that this evidence wasn’t there, and they press the boss for his alibi. He gives one, then tells them to go talk to his wife so she can confirm it.

When they visit his wife and start questioning her, Conan notices that her reactions aren’t normal and that she keeps looking at a particular statue. He picks up on the fact that there’s a microphone attached, and he texts Takagi and Chiba to let them know. Also, Conan notices a particular piece of art hanging on the wall and the date that’s on it. Takagi tries letting the wife know that they know the room is bugged without letting the husband know, and she tries to use the ingredients she’s using for a pork soup to tell them something important. The husband appears at that time and shoos Takagi, Chiba, Kogoro, and Conan away. But before they leave, Conan leaves a “good luck charm” with the wife.

I really can’t go into any more detail because it’ll provide direct spoilers for the episode. However, I do have one gripe about how Conan reveals the truth to Takagi and Chiba. He uses the stun dart and bowtie trick while in the backseat of a moving car, and I have a hard time believing that neither Takagi nor Chiba noticed anything going on in the back. I had a hard time using my “willing suspension of disbelief” for this scene.

This was an OK one-episode murder mystery. While I’ve seen stronger ones, I’ve also seen weaker ones as well. Like I said, my main issue was how the stun dart and bowtie trick were utilized in this episode. If it wasn’t for that, I probably would have a little better opinion of this episode.

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Case Closed: Episode 1043 – “The Figure of Revenge”

The episode opens with a group of four people who are part of a club that designs figures. When it’s said that the Detective Boys are coming over to visit, one of the members (Shirahashi) becomes upset because the group is trying to finish their designs before the deadline for an upcoming contest. It turns out that Shirahashi has a lot on the line if he wins the contest and they’re cutting it close to the deadline. So when the Detective Boys first appear, Shirahashi is quite rude to them. The kids are taken to a nearby living room and shown a display of Masked Yaiba figures.

Leading up to the crime, Conan manages to overhear a couple of important conversations. One is of Shirahashi talking on the phone with someone he’s made a deal with. The other is between two of the other members of the club, who reference another member named Yuri who had killed herself a year earlier.

As the group is taking a break (except Shirahashi, because he wants to work on his design uninterrupted), the power goes out and explosions are heard in the studio. Shirahashi is trapped inside the room, and when the police come, they find he has died from smoke inhalation. When Shirahashi was introduced and was portrayed as being a jerk, I knew right away that he was going to be the victim of the crime.

The rest of the episode sees Conan wandering around and picking up pieces of information while the police are conducting their investigation. When it seems like the police have figured out who the guilty party is, Dr. Agasa comes at Conan’s request and thanks to the bowtie trick, Conan uses Agasa to reveal the last piece of information needed to truly reveal who was guilty of the crime.

Unfortunately, if I go into any more detail, I run the risk of giving away spoilers. Ultimately, this was an OK episode for a one-episode murder mystery, although Genta got on my nerves a little. Sometimes, it seems like the writers of the anime like to depict Genta as a kid with little to no common sense, and they used this portrayal a couple of times in this episode. And once again, this was a story featuring the Detective Boys where Ai wasn’t involved, and her absence wasn’t acknowledged. It seems like that, most of the time, the writers of the non-canon filler episodes that feature the Detective Boys forget that Ai even exists. Oh well.

Next week is another one-episode mystery, and hopefully it’ll be stronger than this one. “The Figure of Revenge” wasn’t a bad episode, per se, but it wasn’t quite as strong as it could have been.

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Case Closed: Episode 1042 – “Police Academy Arc Wild Police Story CASE. Hagiwara Kenji”

This is another episode that focuses on Rei’s time at the police academy. From the title, you can already tell that Kenji is going to be the focus of the episode. But it turns out that Jinpei, Hagiwara’s childhood friend, has an important development in this episode as well, when the two of them are approached about joining the riot police’s bomb squad. Jinpei is all for it, while Kenji is unsure. Because of witnessing his father’s shop going bankrupt after things were going so well, Kenji is hesitant about moving forward when things are looking good (or, as he says, he “puts on the brakes”).

We also get a brief bit for Morofushi’s story, and it seems he might be getting closer to getting a lead on the man who killed his parents. Unfortunately, before he can go any further, a runaway truck with a car attached to the back of it on accident, comes flying by. Morofushi and Wataru start out trying to follow the truck, and discover that the driver of the truck is unconscious. Since it’s a runaway truck, Morofushi calls Rei for assistance, since he’s closer than the police or fire departments. Rei, Kenji, and Jinpei go to help. Jinpei, of course, comes up with reckless ideas on how to try to bring the situation under control. During the climax, Kenji remembers what Jinpei said earlier about “stepping on the gas,” and uses this as the way to get himself and Rei out of the situation that they find themselves facing.

This episode ended up being important to develop Kenji’s character. Not only did the audience get to learn a little more about his past, but the offer to join the bomb squad and Kenji’s interactions and conversations with Jinpei make him realize that he’s been holding himself back. Also, seeing Jinpei being approached to join the bomb squad is an important development, because this becomes a major aspect of his character after he graduates from the academy. Having this episode air so close to when the Detective Conan: The Bride of Halloween anime film was released in Japanese theaters also makes sense, since Jinpei and his being part of the bomb squad during his career is an important aspect of that film.

I thought this was another good episode about Rei’s time in the police academy. We still need an episode that focuses on Morofushi’s story, and I expect we’ll get that story at some point in the future. There have been enough hints dropped about it in the three police academy stories we’ve already seen, as well as the fact that the other three characters had episodes focusing on them, so it seems safe to say that Morofushi will get his own episode as well.

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Case Closed: Episode 1041 – “The Unstated Alibi”

The episode opens with Conan, Ai, and the other Detective Boys out and about in Beika City. A police officer on a bicycle suddenly rushes by, and Ai thinks he’s heading toward an incident. So, of course, the kids go to check it out. Apparently, an old woman was pushed down some stairs. As the police officer asks if anyone witnessed anything, the gathered crowd says they didn’t. One of the Detective Boys notices a man off to the side, trying to stay out of sight. The Detective Boys ask if he saw anything. It seems like he’s going to answer, but then quickly says he didn’t see anything and leaves. The kids find this suspicious, so Genta and Mitsuhide start following him. The others start asking people nearby if they know anything about him.

Conan eventually finds out that the man had been in a nearby cafe earlier. They learn he received a phone call there, which gives them a last name and the location he’s from as potential clues to his identity. When the others meet up with Genta and Mitsuhide, they find out the man seemed to be going out of his way to make himself noticed before getting onto a train that takes him to a location further away than the location that he’s supposed to be from.

The Detective Boys follow him to the city he headed to, and quickly discover he has been taken into police custody by Inspector Megure, Takagi, and Chiba. Apparently, he’s a person of interest in an attack that happened in this city. It’s discovered this man has a different name than the one he claimed to have when he was in the cafe, and he keeps insisting that he wasn’t in Beika City, although the time he was in Beika City coincided with the time the attack took place in this city. Conan and the other kids are confused as to why he refuses to say he has an alibi, so Conan looks up the last name that they were given at the cafe, and found there’s only one person with that last name in the city that he’s supposed to be from.

At this point, all I will say is that when the kids go to check up on this person, they stumble into information that ultimately solves two mysteries. At the end of the episode, they solve three mysteries. And after the closing credits, the post-credits scene reveals the truth behind the old woman and the incident that got this whole story in motion.

All in all, I have to say that for a story that focuses on the Detective Boys, this one wasn’t too bad. I’ve definitely seen much worse stories that focused on them. I have to admit that I hadn’t figured out the truth behind the main mystery in this story until Conan spelled everything out. Maybe I should have been able to guess one of the important aspects of the truth behind the mystery, but I didn’t. Also, I have to say that for a one episode mystery, this was pretty decent.

The next episode returns us to Amuro’s time at the police academy, so I’m looking forward to it. I have to admit that these special episodes provide a nice break from the main Case Closed story, especially during times when the main story is focusing more on filler stories than on canon material that progresses the overarching story about the Black Organization.

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Discotek Media Announces Anime Releases for July 2022

Discotek Media has announced that it will release the Heart and Yummie (You Are Umasou), Lupin III: Prison of the Past, Holmes of Kyoto, Case Closed: The Fist of Blue Sapphire, (Detective Conan: Fist of Blue Sapphire), and Violence Jack anime on Blu-ray Disc on July 26, 2022. The company will release the Powered Armor Dorvack anime on standard definition Blu-ray Disc on the same day.

The company’s release of Heart and Yummie will be a limited edition collection, and there will only be 2,000 copies total. The Blu-ray Disc will include both the movies and television anime shorts in Japanese with English subtitles.

Discotek’s release of the Lupin III: Prison of the Past television anime will include the original Japanese version with English subtitles and a new English dub. The special premiered in Japan in November 2019.

The company’s release of Holmes of Kyoto will include all 12 episodes in 1080 HD in Japanese with English subtitles. The Blu-ray Disc will be limited to 1,500 copies. The television anime adaptation of Mai Mochizuki’s Holmes at Kyoto Teramachi Sanjō mystery novel series premiered in July 2018. Crunchyroll simulcast the series as it aired in Japan.

Discotek’s release of Detective Conan: Fist of Blue Sapphire will include the original Japanese version with English subtitles and a new English dub. The movie is the 23rd Detective Conan anime film and it opened in Japan in April 2019.

The company’s release of Violence Jack will feature a new 2K transfer of the uncensored version of the anime, marking the first completely uncensored release of the anime anywhere. Episodes 2 and 3 will release in both 16:9 and 4:3 formats. Discotek released the OVA series on home video in 2015.

Discotek’s SDBD release of Powered Armor Dorvack will include all 36 episodes in standard definition, a promo clip, two short films, and a music video. The series aired in Japan from October 1983 to June 1984.

Source: ANN

Case Closed: Episode 1040 – “The Case of Ayumi’s Illustrated Diary 2”

I liked how this episode opened by acknowledging the previous episode about Ayumi’s illustrated diary, complete with the child-like drawings from Ayumi’s diary. In fact, we get to see Ayumi’s drawings show up several times throughout the episode for the new illustrated diary that she does in this episode. Whenever Ayumi’s drawings appear, we get to hear Ayumi narrating what’s happening.

The new story opens when the Detective Boys (minus Ai, who is once again absent but her absence isn’t acknowledged) are on a drive with Professor Agasa. They stop when they see a crowd standing around a building, and flashes of light are coming from a window. Ayumi deduces that it’s Morse Code, and Conan picks up that it’s an “SOS” signal. Professor Agasa and the Detective Boys make it into the building and find a man tied up and using his feet to make the light source by him create the Morse Code. The man says he’s a delivery driver, and that he was captured when the person he was making a delivery to had a gun drop out of his pocket. The man also claims he overheard his captors say they had planted a bomb in the building.

The police are called, and the bomb squad is brought in. However, all they find is an alarm clock inside a cardboard box. As this sequence was playing out, I had my suspicions about the delivery driver. It turns out Conan also had similar suspicions as well. As the investigation is winding down, the police learn of an armed robbery at a jewelry shop… and it’s the same jeweler who was robbed in the first episode about Ayumi’s illustrated diary. That poor jeweler just can’t seem to catch a break.

Thanks to some quick thinking, Conan had attached a tracker to the delivery driver’s motorcycle, and Conan uses the signal to lead Dr. Agasa and the others to it. They find the delivery driver has been attacked, and that there’s dash cam video in his bike showing what happened, as well as showing a getaway car and it’s license plate number. Conan relays the information to Detectives Takagi and Chiba, and the chase is on. In the end, it’s Conan who ultimately catches the thieves.

I can’t really go into much more detail without providing major spoilers for the episode. While it may not have been the best Case Closed episode I’ve ever seen, it wasn’t bad for what it was. For a story that’s revolving around Ayumi’s illustrated diary, the writers couldn’t really do anything drastic, such as a murder case. But I have to say that occasionally including Ayumi’s drawings and her narration did help provide some levity for the episode, and it was a nice occasional break from what was happening. I definitely wouldn’t mind another episode utilizing Ayumi’s illustrated diary, but if that ever comes to pass, hopefully there would be another significant break like there was between this episode and the first episode about Ayumi’s illustrated diary.

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Case Closed: Episode 1039 – “The Flying Jack-o-lantern”

If you can’t tell by the title, this episode ties in with Halloween. While it may seem strange for a Halloween episode to air in April, this episode ties in with the film that was just released in Japan (which is also set at Halloween).

The episode opens with a couple of men walking down the street at night and going around a construction project. They are surprised when they see “flying Jack-o’-lantern ghosts,” and it turns out others see the “ghosts,” with one witness sharing a video online.

The next day, Conan goes to Cafe Poirot, because Kogoro and Ran have gone out. Azusa, the owner, has closed the cafe temporarily so she can carve Jack-o’-lanterns. Conan helps her, and the two talk about Halloween and its origins. I thought this was kind of interesting. But as they work, three of the cafe’s regulars arrive, and explain that their Jack-o’-lanterns have been stolen.

Azusa and Conan take on the case, which causes Azusa to close the cafe for the day. It turns out the three patrons are all neighbors, so they’re able to start the investigation in their neighborhood. Another neighbor has a video camera, and it turns out he’s in charge of the shopping center’s Halloween festivities. Unfortunately, his camera footage doesn’t provide anything that’s obviously useful. But later, Conan learns something about what this man is doing for the Halloween festivities, and this allows Conan to deduce the truth behind who stole the Jack-o’-lanterns. But it’s revealed that there were good intentions behind the theft. This doesn’t entirely excuse the theft, though.

Compared to a lot of the Case Closed mysteries, this is actually rather tame. No murder, no attempted murder, and the tone pf the episode was rather light. While this may not be a “hard hitting” case for Conan, it’s actually a nice change of pace. If it wasn’t for the fact that the episode being set at Halloween was tied in with a movie with a serious tone, we probably wouldn’t have gotten an episode like this. And it was nice to see that even though this was a more light-hearted episode, that the writers didn’t try to incorporate the Detective Boys into the story. To be honest, with the way this mystery was handled, including them just wouldn’t have worked.

The preview for the next episode shows that we will be seeing the Detective Boys again, and that it’s a second episode that somehow ties in with “Ayumi’s Illustrated Diary.” However, from the preview, the tone of the next episode appears to be more serious than the first “Ayumi’s Illustrated Diary,” so it’s going to be interesting to see how the writers pull this off.

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Anime Blu-ray Review: Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno

Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno is the 19th film released for the Case Closed franchise, and it was released to Japanese theaters on April 18, 2015.

Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno
English Publisher: Discotek Media
Format: Blu-ray
Release Date: January 25, 2022

The focus of the film is on Van Gogh’s seven “Sunflowers” paintings. At the beginning of the film, Sonoko and her uncle, Jirokichi Suzuki, win one of the “Sunflowers” paintings at an auction in New York City. At a press conference, Jirokichi announces a plan to gather all seven of Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” paintings from around the world for a grand exhibition. The conference is interrupted by a card being thrown onto the platform, and it’s from none other than Kaito Kid. Inspector Charlie, a New York Police Department professional who is part of the team to protect the “Sunflowers” chases after Kaito Kid but loses him. As the film progresses, we see that Charlie has made it his mission to catch Kaito Kid and take him down.

It turns out that Kogoro Mori is part of Jirokichi’s seven specialists to oversee the exhibition and protection of the “Sunflowers,” and this is how Conan gets involved with the story. The action really gets going when the plane that Sonoko, her uncle, the “Sunflowers” they purchased, as well as some of the seven specialists are on has an explosion and needs to make an emergency landing. It looks like Kaito Kid is behind it, yet he makes sure to rescue the “Sunflowers” and put it in a safe spot to be found. Charlie is insistent that Kaito Kid is behind what happened and will do anything to get his hand on the “Sunflowers,” but Conan doesn’t believe it. What’s happened up to this point doesn’t fit with Kaito Kid’s M.O.

Meanwhile, another one of the “Sunflowers” is currently being exhibited at a museum in Tokyo, and Kaito Kid sends a warning card about this “Sunflowers” being stolen. But when the police go to transport this one to safety, another Kaito Kid card is found on the lid that declares that the original has already been taken and replaced with a fake. Just when it seems like one of the seven specialists will be taking the painting to examine it at her workshop, Kaito Kid reveals that he’s there in disguise and takes the painting. A ransom is placed on the painting in order to get it back, and there’s quite a scene to get it back.

The film culminates with Jirokichi’s “Sunflowers” exhibit, where an action-packed climax ultimately reveals the truth about Kaito Kid and the real culprit behind everything that has happened. There’s also an interesting reveal that takes place regarding one of the “Sunflowers.”

I was riveted as I watched Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno. The opening scenes establish what the story is going to be about, and they also get Kaito Kid involved right from the get-go. I also thought that, overall, the story found ways include action and excitement as the story built without it feeling forced. I also liked the fact that the story utilizes Kaito Kid. He’s a character in the series that I like, but he doesn’t show up a whole lot in what I’ve seen. Getting to see Kaito Kid play a major role in one of the films was a treat.

When it comes to the Blu-ray release, it has 1.77.1 16:9 / 1080p High Definition video. The audio includes English DTS-MA 5.1, Japanese DTS-MA 5.1, and Japanese LPCM 2.0. I had no complaints with either the video or audio quality for this release.

For bonus features, there were two teaser videos, a trailer for the film, and a textless version of the ending credits. The first teaser for the film threw me off, though. While the footage that appears in the teaser appears the film, most of the dialogue is exclusive for the teaser. The second teaser was consistent with what was seen in the film. The trailer is a standard movie trailer.

It should also be noted that the outer slipcase labels the release as Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno, but the cover artwork on the Blu-ray box itself and the Blu-ray Disc labels the film as Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno.

If you’re a fan of the Case Closed anime and are trying to acquire home video releases for the series, I would recommend acquiring this release of Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno for your anime library.

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Anime Film Review: Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno

Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno is the 19th film released for the franchise.

Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno
Directed by: Kobun Shizuno
Written by: Takeharu Sakurai
Starring: Minami Takayama, Kappei Yamaguchi, Wakana Yamazaki, Rikiya Koyama
Run Time: 112 minutes

The film opens at an auction house in New York City, where a painting that has been declared to be one of Vincent van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” (which was thought to be destroyed during a U.S. air raid in Japan in World War II) is up for auction. At the auction is Jirokichi Suzuki and his niece, Sonoko, and it turns out Jirokichi wins the auction. At a press conference, Jirokichi announces a plan to gather all seven of Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” paintings from around the world for a grand exhibition. The conference is interrupted by a card being thrown onto the platform, and it’s from none other than Kaito Kid. Inspector Charlie, a New York Police Department professional who is part of the team to protect the “Sunflowers,” chases after Kaito Kid but loses him. As the film progresses, we see that Charlie has made it his mission to catch Kaito Kid and take him down.

When it comes to the section that takes place in New York, it was interesting to note that everyone in these scenes spoke Japanese. In the past, when events take place in America, there are at least some characters (usually the Americans) speaking English. To see that the Americans are all speaking fluent Japanese rang a little false to me, especially knowing that other times in the franchise, Americans are depicted speaking English. I know it’s a slight nitpick, but this really jumped out at me.

It turns out that Kogoro Mori is part of Jirokichi’s seven specialists to oversee the exhibition and protection of the “Sunflowers,” and this is how Conan gets involved with the story. The action really gets going when the plane that Sonoko, her uncle, the “Sunflowers” they purchased, as well as some of the seven specialists are on has an explosion and needs to make an emergency landing. It looks like Kaito Kid is behind it, yet he makes sure to rescue the “Sunflowers” and put it in a safe spot to be found. Charlie is insistent that Kaito Kid is behind what happened and will do anything to get his hand on the “Sunflowers,” but Conan doesn’t believe it. What’s happened up to this point doesn’t fit with Kaito Kid’s M.O.

Meanwhile, another one of the “Sunflowers” is currently being exhibited at a museum in Tokyo, and Dr. Agasa takes the Detective Boys to see it. At the exhibit, Ai talks to an old woman who is sitting looking at “Sunflowers,” and it’s revealed she comes every day to look at that painting. Kaito Kid sends another card, warning about the theft of this “Sunflowers.” But when the police go to transport this one to safety, another Kaito Kid card is found on the lid that declares that the original has already been taken and replaced with a fake. Just when it seems like one of the seven specialists will be taking the painting to examine it at her workshop, Kaito Kid reveals that he’s there in disguise and takes the painting. A ransom is placed on the painting in order to get it back, and there’s quite a scene to get it back.

The film culminates with Jirokichi’s “Sunflowers” exhibit, where an action-packed climax ultimately reveals the truth about Kaito Kid and the real culprit behind everything that has happened. There’s also an interesting reveal that takes place regarding one of the “Sunflowers.”

I was riveted as I watched Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno. The opening scenes establish what the story is going to be about, and they also get Kaito Kid involved right from the get-go. I also thought the story found ways include action and excitement as the story built without it feeling forced. In some respects, though, the final danger for Conan during the climax felt like it was a little overboard, but this is something I’ve come to expect from the Case Closed films. And especially after all the excitement from some of the previous scenes, they had to find a way to top that.

Before writing up this review, I did some quick research on Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers.” The writer of the film obviously did their homework, because I found a lot of the basic facts concerning the paintings presented in the film matched what I found while looking online. Obviously, the plot point about one of the “Sunflowers” almost being destroyed in an air raid in World War II was created for the film, but this had to be done in order to make the story work.

Another thing I really liked about this film is the fact that it utilizes the character of Kaito Kid. He’s a character in the series that I like, but he doesn’t show up a whole lot in what I’ve seen of the series. Getting to see Kaito Kid play a major role in one of the films was a treat.

Case Closed: Sunflowers of Inferno is worth viewing at least once for fans of the Case Closed franchise.

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Crunchyroll Announces Simulcasts for the Spring 2022 Anime Season

Crunchyroll has announced its anime simulcast lineup for the Spring 2022 season.

Spy x Family
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Kaguya-sama: Love is War -Ultra Romantic-
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

The Rising of the Shield Hero Season 2
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Ascendance of a Bookworm Season 3
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Estab Life: Great Escape
Airtime: March 23, 2022 at 4:00 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Shenmue the Animation
Airtime: Saturdays at 9:00 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Love After World Domination
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

A Couple of Cuckoos
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

AOASHI
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

BUILD DIVIDE -#FFFFFF- CODE WHITE
Airtime: TBA
Available in: United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and LATAM

Dance Dance Danseur
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Date A Live IV
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, CIS, and India

Don’t Hurt Me, My Healer!
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Fanfare of Adolescence
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

In the Heart of Kunoichi Tsubaki
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Die Neue These – Collision
Airtime: Thursdays at 4:00 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Nordics, and LATAM

Love All Play
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Magia Record: Puella Magi Madoka Magica Side Story Final Season
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Latin America (South and Central America including Mexico), Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, Europe, MENA, and India

MAHJONG SOUL PON☆
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Requiem of the Rose King
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Science Fell in Love, So I Tried to Prove It R=1-SIN0
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Shikimori’s Not Just a Cutie
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Skeleton Knight in Another World
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Sony Music AnimeSongs Online 2022
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

The Dawn of the Witch
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

The Greatest Demon Lord Is Reborn as a Typical Nobody
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Tomodachi Game
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Trapped in a Dating Sim: The World of Otome Games Is Tough For Mobs
Airtime: TBA
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Boruto: Naruto Next Generations
Airtime: Sundays at 2:00 a.m. PDT
Available to: Crunchyroll members worldwide excluding Japan, and Premium members in French-speaking territories

Case Closed
Airtime: Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. PDT
Available in: United States and United States territories, Canada, the United Kingdom and United Kingdom territories, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand

Cue!
Airtime: Fridays at 11:30 a.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Delicious Party Pretty Cure
Airtime: Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Latin America including the Caribbean, South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa

Digimon Ghost Game
Airtime: Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Dragon Quest The Adventure of Dai
Airtime: Fridays at 6:00 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

One Piece
Airtime: Saturdays at 6:00 p.m. PDT
Available in: North America, South America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, American Samoa, Guam, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, US Minor Outlying Islands, Europe, Russia, Middle East, and Africa

Salaryman’s Club
Airtime: Saturdays at 11:30 a.m. PDT
Available in: North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and CIS

Source: Crunchyroll