Anime Blu-ray Review: Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small

Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small was a television special for the 20th anniversary of the Case Closed (aka Detective Conan) anime. The special, which aired on Japanese television in 2016, is a re-telling of the first episode and part of the second episode of the anime series.

Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small
English Publisher: Discotek Media
Format: Blu-ray
Release Date: July 28, 2020

With a 94-minute runtime, additional scenes were added to expand out the story. To me, the new scenes helped to flesh out the story and add more detail that wasn’t available to the viewer originally. These new scenes include Sherry doing an experiment on the poison that becomes important in the story, another scene of Black Organization members Gin and Vodka to help establish them as characters before they appear at Tropical Land, and a scene at Sonoko’s house that helps to explain the murder at the party that opened the original series.

Another thing I appreciated was the references to characters who didn’t exist originally in the story but came about later in the series. As a viewer who has seen the more recent episodes of Case Closed, it was kind of exciting to see these characters making appearances in this story.

Even though the story that takes place at Tropical Land, as well as what happens after Shinichi shrinks down because of poison, is similar to what was seen in the original, there were still the occasional difference. Probably the most notable difference was the fact that the decapitation scene on the roller coaster is a little more gruesome than what was depicted originally.

The ending credits for the special include some of the footage from the original episode, and it really emphasizes just how much the character designs and animation has changed over 20 years. I have to say that the character designs and animation are much cleaner in the later episodes than in the earlier ones. It’s not to say that these elements were bad early on, it’s just that they look just so different after watching more recent episodes of the franchise over the past few years.

I really enjoyed the Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small special. I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect of this remake of the establishing story of the series, but it exceeded my expectations. If you’re a fan of Case Closed and haven’t already seen the Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small, I would highly recommend it.

When it comes to the Blu-ray release, it has 1.77.1 16:9 / 1080p High Definition video. The audio includes English DTS-MA 5.1, Japanese DTS-MA 5.1, and Japanese LPCM 2.0. I was surprised and impressed that this release included Japanese 5.1, because that isn’t common for North American anime releases. I had no complaints with either the video or audio quality for this release.

Unfortunately, the only bonus feature included on this release is a clean opening. Normally, this would disappoint me, but with how hard it had been to get Case Closed releases in the United States after FUNimation lost the license, I’m grateful to have the chance to even have this release be available for North American fans.

It should also be noted that the outer slipcase labels the release as Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small, but the cover artwork on the Blu-ray box itself and the Blu-ray Disc labels the special as Detective Conan Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small.

If you’re a fan of the Case Closed anime and are trying to acquire home video releases for the series, I would recommend acquiring this release of Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small for your anime library.

Additional posts about Case Closed:

Anime Special Review: Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small

Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small was a television special for the 20th anniversary of the Case Closed (aka Detective Conan) anime. It’s a re-telling of the first episode and part of the second episode of the anime series.

Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small
Original Japanese airdate: December 9, 2016
Directed by: Yasuichiro Yamamoto
Runtime: 94 minutes

The special opens with Sherry working on an experiment for the Black Organization. It turns out what she’s working on is an experimental poison. This is then followed up by two members of the Black Organization, Vodka and Gin, approaching a man at a bar to discuss a “rat problem” in the organization. After their conversation, the man is seen getting into a car that explodes. These two scenes are completely new for this special, and I appreciated the inclusion of both. The audience already knows who Sherry will end up being in the series and her connection with the poison that becomes important in this story, so getting to see this was a nice touch. And I also thought having this new scene with Vodka and Gin worked as an introduction for these two characters, so they don’t just appear out of the blue like they did in the original story.

We also see Ran losing her new smartphone down a grate, because she wasn’t aware that it was in her hood. Shinichi admits to putting it there after using it to figure something out for a case, and she insists that he buy her a new phone. Later, Shinichi also finds himself making a promise to take Ran to Tropical Land if she wins her next karate tournament. On the day they’re supposed to buy the new phone, Sonoko comes over and drags Ran and Shinichi to her place so they can try some new confection. But while they’re at Sonoko’s house, they discover her parents have a visitor. The man, Takanori Sewa, is in a wheelchair, and he talks about threatening letters he has received before his New Year’s Party. Shinichi offers his assistance as a high school detective who has helped the police, but Sewa declines. The meeting with Sewa was also a newly added scene for this special, and I appreciated that Shinichi and Sewa have this introduction and connection to lead up to Shinichi being involved with that storyline later.

During Ran’s karate match, Shinichi receives a call from Inspector Megure about a case, and he has to leave in the middle of the match. Ran, who’s up against a strong rival, sees Shinichi mouth to her that he’s leaving. She gets upset and then ends up winning the match… which ultimately sets up the main storyline that takes place at Tropical Land.

Shinichi arrives at the crime scene, which is at Takanori Sewa’s party. One of the guests was found murdered, and the police are trying to figure out who committed the crime. This is actually the case that opened the first episode of Case Closed, and Shinichi figures out the culprit. In this version, he ended up getting his first clue during his initial meeting with Sewa at Sonoko’s house. This case brings major attention to Shinichi in the media, and he starts getting fan letters and being recognized. Unfortunately, this means that this is also bringing his name to the attention of the Black Organization.

We then get the same story at Tropical Land that was shown at the beginning of the Case Closed anime. The main difference here is that the scene where the head is decapitated on the roller coaster ride is a little more gruesome than it was in the original telling. Also, everything from Shinichi being given the poison to being taken to live with Ran and her father, Kogoro, is pretty similar.

But then, we start getting scenes that move the story ahead in time. I recognized some of them from the anime episodes that FUNimation Entertainment released, but there were also a few scenes that I didn’t know or recognize, which I’m sure come from the episodes between the last one FUNimation released and the first episode that Crunchyroll began streaming. The most interesting of these was the one of Sherry breaking into Shinichi’s home and finding the evidence she needed to put two and two together that Shinichi and Conan are the same person. The final scene sees Sherry going onto a computer and finding a list of persons who need to be investigated. She changes Shinichi’s status from “Unknown” to “Dead.”

For the ending credits, there are shots from the early episodes of Case Closed incorporated into it, and this shows just how much the animation style changed over the course of 20 years. I have to say that the character designs and animation are much cleaner in the later episodes than in the earlier ones. It’s not to say that these elements were bad early on, it’s just that they look just so different after watching more recent episodes of the franchise over the past few years.

I have to say that I really enjoyed the Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small special. I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect of this remake of the establishing story of the series, but it exceeded my expectations. It preserved all the important material from the original story and added scenes to help flesh out that material. As a viewer who has seen some of the episodes that are much later in the franchise, I also appreciated the references to characters who weren’t introduced until later in the story.

If you’re a fan of Case Closed and haven’t already seen the Case Closed Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small, I would highly recommend finding a legal way to do so. It’s definitely worth it.

Additional posts about Case Closed:

Case Closed: Episode 998 – “The Frying Pan of Hatred”

The episode opens with Naoyuki Omura, the president of a venture company, criticizing a frying pan made by Masakazu Koshiro, the R&D chief. This leads to the two of them getting into a heated argument, which is broken up by two employees: Tomi Mizusawa and Tetsuo Taguchi. But right from the get-go, we can see a hint of where this story will be headed.

Ran, along with Kogoro and Conan, attend a demonstration of the company’s new frying pan, which is being hosted by Tomi and Tetsuo. Right at first, I was wondering why they were there, and it wasn’t until later in the episode that Ran mentions that she volunteered to be a reviewer for this new frying pan. I kind of wish this explanation had been made earlier, so I wouldn’t have found myself questioning why they were at the demonstration in the first place. When the demonstration reaches a point where there’s supposed to be a word from the president, he doesn’t enter the room. A nearby scream reveals that Omura has been stabbed. Kogoro and Conan rush into the nearby room and declare that Omura is dead. Kogoro calls out to someone to call from an ambulance, but he didn’t specifically call out Ran this time… shocking! But a jar of sleeping pills and some kind of valve are discovered on a nearby table. The guess at this point is that Omura was the victim of a robbery, since his wallet is missing and it appears someone escaped from the room out of an open window.

When the police arrive and ask if all the parties are gathered, Tomi and Tetsuo mention that there’s an adjoining building where the research team works. Just as Megure tells someone to gather those people in with the others, the research building explodes. Kogoro and Conan find Koshiro laying on the floor, and he’s also dead. Conan notices a wallet and a bloody knife nearby. The wallet is determined to be Omura’s, and that the blood on the knife has been identified as Omura’s. A suicide note is also found in the research building.

On the surface, it looks like Kohiro murdered Omura and then killed himself. But I thought this explanation was too easy, especially since we still had a significant amount of the episode remaining. Conan seemed to think so, too, especially after some information that Tomi and Tetsuo relayed to the police. Naturally, Conan takes it upon himself to do some of his own investigation, and he stumbles across a couple of things. Surprisingly, the police already noticed, and Conan claims to Detective Takagi that Kogoro wants access to the reports on these things.

When Conan figures out the truth, he gets lucky that Kogoro comes by at the right moment. A shot from the stun gun later, Conan is able to use his voice-changing bowtie to relay what he’s deduced and eventually get the guilty party to admit their guilt. With this case, there really could only be two potential suspects, since there were only two employees focused on in addition to Omura and Kohiro. It was just a question of which one of them it was. I had been leaning toward the eventual culprit, since the other one didn’t seem to be acting when it came to their emotions about the deaths of the two victims.

For a one-episode murder mystery, this wasn’t bad. A tad predictable, maybe, but it wasn’t bad. It was definitely a more enjoyable episode than last week’s. But then again, just about anything would be a better and more enjoyable episode than last week’s!

Additional posts about Case Closed:

Classic Episode That Will Be Remade as Detective Conan’s 1,000th Episode Is Revealed

Detective Conan (aka Case Closed) will be airing its 1,000th episode on March 6, 2021. To celebrate, a classic episode is being remade, and it has been announced which episode will get this honor. The rebooted mystery will be Episodes 11-12, “The Moonlight Sonata Murder Case.”

The mystery is notable for multiple reasons, amongst them its status as a fan favorite. It’s also the first double-length mystery the anime adaptation ever released. It also marked an important turning point in the plot of the series: it was the case that kicked off Conan’s vow to never let a culprit die.

It was also announced that classical pianist Aimi Kobayashi will be performing “Moonlight Sonata” for the remade episode. The 25-year-old musician has won multiple awards since her childhood debut, and played with orchestras around the world from the Salle Cortot to Carnegie Hall.

Source: Crunchyroll

Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno Anime Film Is Now Available in North America via Digital Distribution

The Fandom Post is reporting that the Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno anime film is available in North America through digital distribution.

The film can be purchased on Amazon in Japanese with English subtitles for $14.99 or rent for $3.99 or the English dub for the same. iTunes has it where both languages are available with rental or purchase for $4.99 or $14.99 respectively. Google Play has it for $3.99 and $12.99 in both languages and Microsoft has it in their store for $4.99 and $14.99, again with both languages.

The story of Detective Conan: Sunflowers of Inferno is described as:

When Sonoko’s grandfather wins the final bid for Van Gogh’s Sunflowers that was long thought to be destroyed, he announces to open an exhibition to display a complete collection of Van Gogh’s Sunflowers. But the excitement is brought even higher when suddenly they discover a calling card warning of an imminent heist left by the infamous thief known as Kid the Phantom Thief.

Source: The Fandom Post

Anime Soundtrack Review: The Best of Detective Conan

The Best of Detective Conan is a 16-track CD of theme songs from the Detective Conan anime series.

The Best of Detective Conan
Publisher: Zain Records
Release Date: November 29, 2000

This CD includes five opening theme songs from the Detective Conan (aka Case Closed) anime, eight ending theme songs from the anime series, and theme songs from three of the Detective Conan anime films.

The first track on the CD is “Mystery” by Miho Komatsu, and it was used as the third opening theme for the Detective Conan anime. It appeared in episodes 53-96. This is another upbeat and iconic theme song from the series. In fact, this theme song was so iconic that years later, a new version was recorded and used as an opening theme. It’s one of those songs that a Detective Conan fan will instantly recognize from its opening notes. It appears in its full-length version on this disc, instead of the shortened version that was used in the anime. I think this song is just as strong in its full-length version as it is in its shortened version.

The next song on the CD is “Spinning the Roulette Wheel of Destiny” by ZARD, which was used as the fourth opening theme song from the anime series. It appeared in episodes 97-123. The opening flamenco guitar grabs the listener’s interest because it’s not something you’d expect to hear from an anime theme song. After a slow vocal intro, it becomes a midtempo song. This is another standout theme song because of these choices.

It should be noted that the fifth opening theme song, “TRUTH ~A Great Detective of Love~” by TWO-MIX was left off this collection. I find this to be rather puzzling, especially when you factor in that one of the members of TWO-MIX is the voice actress for Conan Edogawa.

This means that the next track on the disc is “Just Barely Chop” by B’z, which was the sixth opening theme for the anime. It appeared in episodes 143-167. This would be the first opening theme on this disc I’m not familiar with, since this is past the point that FUNimation Entertainment released the series in North America. This theme song rocks, though. Musically, it kind of makes me think of Queensryche, and there are times that the lead vocalist kind of sounds like he’s trying to emulate Geoff Tate, the lead singer of Queensryche.

This is followed by “Mysterious Eyes” by GARNET CROW, which was used as the seventh opening theme song for the Detective Conan anime series. It was used in episodes 168-204. This one has a pop rock feel to it, and it’s a midtempo track. I really like how this track feels musically, and I think it sounds like a good opening theme song for an anime.

Next is “This Love Is Thrill, Shock, Suspense” by Rina Aiuchi, which was used as the eighth opening theme for the series. It appeared in episodes 205-230. This one is an upbeat track, and it sounds like an anime opening theme from the late 1990’s/early 2000’s. That doesn’t mean it’s a bad song, though. It’s enjoyable enough, even though it sounds dated now.

The next song on the CD is “Romance of Light and Shadow” by Keiko Utoku, which was the third ending theme song for Detective Conan. It appeared in episodes 52-70. Musically, it relies on an acoustic guitar. It’s a slow-to-midtempo track, and it has a mellow sound to it. It’s a memorable ending theme, and I recognized it instantly when I heard it while listening to this disc.

This is followed by “The Summer Without You” by DEEN, which was used as the fourth ending theme for the anime series. It appeared in episodes 71-83. This is another midtempo track, which has an emphasis on piano. In some respects, the instrumental intro to this song kind of makes me think of Trans-Siberian Orchestra for some reason. This is another ending theme I recognized instantly when I heard it on this disc.

Next is “Just One Wish” by Miho Komatsu, which was used as the fifth ending theme for Detective Conan. It appeared in episodes 84-108. This is a midtempo track that has an emphasis on piano and strings, although there is some percussion and electronic elements included. This is another memorable ending theme song from the anime.

The next song on the CD is “Like Standing on Ice,” which was also performed by Miho Komatsu. This was the sixth ending theme song, and it appeared in episodes 109-131. Unlike the previous song, this one is more upbeat. Miho Komatsu has the voice to pull off both of these songs, and this ending theme is just as memorable as “Just One Wish.”

This is followed by “Still For Your Love” by Rumania Montevideo, which was used as the seventh ending theme song for the Detective Conan anime. It appeared in episodes 132-152. This is the first ending theme to appear on this disc that I hadn’t heard before, since it started in an episode that wasn’t released in North America by FUNimation Entertainment. When it starts, it sounds like it’s going to rock out, but then it becomes a midtempo song. Just when it seems it’s not going anywhere, it starts to rock at about a minute-and-a-half. It’s not a bad song, but it takes it a while to go anywhere musically.

Next is “Free Magic” by WAG, which was used as the eighth ending theme for the anime series. It appeared in episodes 153-179. This one is a rock song that sounds like it took some inspiration from The Beatles’ material from the late 1960’s. It’s not a bad song, but it sounds like a typical anime song for a shonen anime that’s trying to sound a little different by channeling The Beatles.

The next song on the CD is “Secret of My Heart” by Mai Kuraki, which was used as the ninth ending theme for the anime. It appeared in episodes 180-204. Musically, it makes me think of something that would have been recorded in the West by one of the teen pop stars of the late 1990’s/early 2000’s. However, I like the flow of this song, especially the flow of the vocal delivery in the chorus. It’s a nice midtempo track.

This is followed by “Summer’s Illusion” by GARNET CROW, which was used as the 10th ending theme for Detective Conan. It appeared in episodes 205-218. Like their opening theme song that appeared earlier on this disc, this one has a laid-back pop rock sound to it. It’s an enjoyable enough midtempo theme song.

After this, the disc focuses on theme songs from some of the Detective Conan anime films. However, it should be noted that “Happy Birthday” by Kyoko, which was used as the theme for the first Detective Conan film (The Time-Bombed Skyscraper), is inexplicably left off of this release. Instead, we have “Like I’ve Returned to When I Was a Teenage Girl” by ZARD, which was the theme song for the second Detective Conan film, The Fourteenth Target. This song has a very different sound and feel to it than their previous song on the disc. This piano-based ballad sounds really nice, though, and it shows that the vocalist for ZARD is capable of singing songs of different sounds and tempos.

Next is “ONE” by B’z, which was used as the theme for the third Detective Conan film, The Last Wizard of the Century. While this song has more of a rock sound than the previous two anime film themes did, it’s still mellower than the opening theme song that B’z did that appeared earlier on this disc. It’s nice to hear that they’re capable of having more to them than just sounding like a copy of Queensryche.

The final track on the disc is “Because You Are Here” by Miho Komatsu, which was used as the theme song for the fourth Detective Conan film, Captured in Her Eyes. This is another piano-based theme song, and stylistically, it fits with the previous two songs that Miho Komatsu performed for the franchise. I have to say that she has a good voice, and I can hear why she was asked to perform on several theme songs.

Overall, The Best of Detective Conan is a very enjoyable listen for fans of the Detective Conan anime series. There are several memorable theme songs included on this disc. And while the others may not be as memorable, they are overall rather enjoyable to listen to. This CD is worth it for fans of Detective Conan who want to own as much of the music from the series as possible in their music collection.

Additional posts about Case Closed:

Anime Soundtrack Review: Detective Conan Theme Song Collection

Detective Conan Theme Song Collection is a six-track CD of theme songs and insert songs from the Detective Conan (aka Case Closed) anime series.

Detective Conan Theme Song Collection
Publisher: Universal Music
Release Date: December 16, 1996

The first song on the disc is “The Pounding of My Heart” by THE HIGH-LOWS, which is the iconic first opening theme song for the Detective Conan anime series. This opening appeared during the first 30 episodes of the series. From the opening notes, you recognize this song instantly if you’ve ever watched the early episodes of the anime. The CD includes the full-length version of the song, and it’s just as catchy in its full-length form as it is in the shortened version that’s used in the anime.

The next track on the disc is “Because I’m By Your Side” by THE HIGH-LOWS, which was used as an “insert song” in Episode 12, “Ayumi’s Kidnapping Case.” It’s a mid-tempo track, and it sounds like something you would expect to hear accompanying flashbacks. I’m not sure if the FUNimation Entertainment release of this episode would have included this or not. It’s a good song, but I can honestly say that I don’t immediately recognize it.

This is followed by “Step By Step” by ZIGGY, which was the first ending theme for Detective Conan. This ending theme was used for the first 26 episodes of the series. This is an iconic ending theme for the series. It’s a very upbeat track that makes you want to rock out. This is also the full-length version of the song, and it remains just as catchy throughout its entire runtime as the shorter version that’s used for the anime.

Next is “Happy End” by ZIGGY, which was used as an “insert song” for two episodes: Episode 17 (“Department Store Hijacking Case”) and Episode 33 (“Detective Boys Survival Case”). This track is strongly influenced by the American rock sound of the late 1950’s and early 1960’s. It almost sounds like something you could hear coming out of a jukebox at a period themed diner. This track is very catchy, and it sounds familiar to me. While I couldn’t tell you in what context the song is used in these two episodes, the song still sounds very familiar.

The next track is “Feel Your Heart” by VELVET Garden, which was used as the second opening theme song for Detective Conan. It appears in episodes 31-52 of the series. According to the liner notes in the disc, this version is the “TV Opening Edit,” and it clocks in at about two-and-a-half minutes. While this is a good song, I have to admit that it’s not quite as memorable as the first opening theme is.

The final track on the disc is “Lover’s Labyrinth” by heath, which was the second ending theme song for the Detective Conan anime. It appeared in episodes 27-51 of the series. It’s a much more aggressive sounding song than the other theme songs that appear on this disc. It’s a song that has rock elements but seems to focus a little more on the electronics. Musically, it kind of makes me think of a watered-down pop version of Ministry’s material from early in the band’s career. I really can’t think of a better way to describe this track. LOL! But I really like it, though.

Overall, I like the songs on Detective Conan Theme Song Collection. However, it’s a little disappointing that this release only has six tracks on it. I’m guessing that they wanted to have a CD out there to promote the anime sooner rather than later, and had to settle on this short release in order to have something out before the Detective Conan anime hit the one-year anniversary of its premiere.

This CD is the only Detective Conan CD that features the first two opening and ending themes for the anime. The Detective Conan theme song series CDs that were released a little later do not include these particular tracks. And since this CD was first released over 20 years ago, it’s not easy to come by now.

My husband had been trying to track this particular CD down for years, and finally found that CDJapan had it available… and that it was new, not used. He surprised me with this as a gift during Christmas 2020.

If you’re a fan of the Detective Conan anime and want to own the first two opening and ending themes of the series on a physical format, then you have to track down a copy of the Detective Conan Theme Song Collection CD. Like I said, as of this writing, the only retailer that still seems to have new copies of this disc is CDJapan.

Additional post about Case Closed:

Detective Conan Anime to Remake a “Legendary” Episode to Mark the Series’ 25th Anniversary

The official website for the Detective Conan television anime has teased that the anime will remake a “legendary god-tier episode,” as the “first part” of its celebration of the anime’s 1,000th episode. The anime will celebrate its 25th anniversary in January 2021, and will air its 1,000th episode on March 6, 2021. The website also stated that the remake will feature the latest staff and production techniques.

Detective Conan previously celebrated its 20th anniversary with a remake of the first two episodes of the anime in the 2016 special Detective Conan – Episode One: The Great Detective Turned Small, which Discotek Media licensed and released on July 28, 2020.

Source: ANN

Case Closed Movie The Crimson Love Letter Available for Digital Purchase

TMS Entertainment has announced that the Case Closed movie Case Closed: The Crimson Love Letter is now available to US and Canadian audiences for digital purchase. Fans can rent or purchase the movie starting on November 19, 2020, on Google Play, iTunes, Microsoft Store, PlayStation Store, and Amazon Prime Video. Available formats include English dub and Japanese audio with English subtitles.

Originally released in Japanese theatres in 2017, The Crimson Love Letter follows Conan as a bombing incident at a TV station leads him to a girl who claims to be one of his friend’s fiancée but is also a potential suspect in a murder of a karuta player. The film grossed 6.89 billion yen at the Japan box office and was the highest grossing Japanese movie in 2017. It also went on to be nominated for “Excellent Animation of the Year” in 2018 by the Japan Academy Film Prize Association.

The Crimson Love Letter is the third Case Closed movie released digitally by TMS. Both Case Closed: Zero the Enforcer and Case Closed: Episode “One” were released on major digital platforms in October 2020. TMS plans to digitally release additional Case Closed movies with the brand-new dub cast in the near future.

“As the number of overseas fans grows, we’re excited to bring them the Case Closed movies, a yearly event in Japan, and share the experience with them. The Crimson Love Letter is an exciting entry in the Case Closed series, and we look forward to making more movies with English dubbing available overseas,” said Masami Tokunaga, Senior Vice President of TMS Entertainment, USA, Inc. “We hope to bring Case Closed fans worldwide a bit closer together, and we have exciting plans for Detective Conan in the coming year!”

Discotek Media Announces Releases for December 29, 2020

Discotek Media has announced that the following titles will be released on December 29, 2020:

  • Lupin III: Tokyo Crisis
  • Gin Rei
  • Case Closed: The Crimson Love Letter
  • Devilman Lady
  • Thermae Romae
  • Battle Athletes

The Lupin III: Tokyo Crisis anime special’s Blu-ray Disc release will include the Japanese version with English subtitles as well as the FUNimation dub.

Discotek’s release of the Gin Rei original video anime (OVA) will feature a new upscaled version of the three-episode OVA in Japanese with English subtitles and with an English dub. The release will also include the “Love Fight” and “GinRei Remix” music videos.

The company’s release of Case Closed: The Crimson Love Letter (Detective Conan: The Crimson Love Letter), the 21st film in the franchise from 2017, will feature a new English dub featuring cast from recent releases of anime in the franchise. The release will also include the film’s Japanese version with English subtitles.

Discotek’s high definition remaster of the Devilman Lady television anime will feature all 26 episodes in Japanese with English subtitles, and it will also include include the English dub from ADV Films’ initial 2003-2004 DVD release (titled Devil Lady).

The company will release the Thermae Romae anime on Blu-ray Disc in Japanese with English subtitles and with the new English dub. The release will also include a special mini episode.

The standard definition Blu-ray Disc release of the Battle Athletes OVA and Battle Athletes Victory television anime will feature newly restored versions of both anime in Japanese with English subtitles and the Pioneer LDC dub. The release will also include the song battle extras.

Source: ANN