Crunchyroll Adds Even More Anime Titles to Its Streaming Catalog

Crunchyroll has announced that it has added the following anime titles to its streaming catalog:

  • Kiddy Grade – available to users in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.
  • Inari Kon Kon – available to users in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Netherlands.
  • Oh! Edo Rocket – available to users in the United States and Canada.
  • D-Frag! – available to users in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and the Netherlands.
  • Solty Rei – available to users in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

Source: ANN

Final English Cast Announcement for D-Frag!

FUNimation Entertainment has made their final English cast announcement for the D-Frag! anime series:

  • Austin Tindle is Kenji Kazama and Young Kenji
  • Bryn Apprill is Roka Shibasaki
  • J. Michael Tatum is Ataru Kawahara and Young Ataru
  • Ian Sinclair is Nagayama
  • Josh Grelle is Yokoshima
  • Morgan Garrett is Tsutsumi Inada

The series premiered in January 2014 and FUNimation simulcast the series as it aired in Japan.

Brains Base produced the series, and Seiki Sugawara directed. Makoto Uezu was in charge of series composition, and Nijine composed the music.

FUNimation will be releasing the complete series in a limited edition Blu-ray and DVD combo pack on April 28, 2015 for US$69.98.

Source: ANN

Two More English Cast Members Announced for D-Frag!

FUNimation Entertainment has announced two more English cast members for the D-Frag! anime:

  • Whitney Rodgers is Chitose Karasuyama
  • Tia Ballard is Takao

FUNimation will be making another cast announcement on January 22, 2015.

D-Frag! focuses on a delinquent named Kenji Kazama. One day, he unexpectedly stumbles across a “game-making club” (working title) with club president Roka Shibasaki, club member and student council president Chitose Karasuyama, club member and first-year student Sakura Mizukami, and club adviser/second-year teacher Minami Ohsawa. Kazama is half-forced to join the club, and the onetime gang member finds himself in an even stranger gathering of girls.

The series premiered in January 2014 and FUNimation simulcast the series as it aired in Japan.

Brains Base produced the series, and Seiki Sugawara directed. Makoto Uezu was in charge of series composition and Nijine composed the music.

FUNimation will release the complete series in a limited edition Blu-ray and DVD combo pack on April 28, 2015 for US$69.98.

Source: ANN

First Two English Cast Members Announced for D-Frag!

FUNimation Entertainment has announced two of the English cast members for the D-Frag! anime:

  • Caitlin Glass is Minami Ohsawa
  • Megan Shipman is Sakura Mizukami

FUNimation will be announcing cast members every day for the next three days.

Brains Base produced the series, and Seiki Sugawara directed. Makoto Uezu was in charge of series composition and Nijine composed the music.

The series premiered in January 2014 and FUNimation simulcast the series as it aired in Japan.

FUNimation will release the complete series in a limited edition Blu-ray and DVD combo pack on April 28, 2015 for US$69.98.

Source: ANN

2014 In Review: Winter 2014 Season

Over the next few days, I’ll be publishing posts looking back at 2014. This first post takes a look back at the shows that I started watching during the Winter 2014 season. This post will also include series that I started watching in the Fall 2013 season that were still running with Winter 2014 started.

Log Horizon: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. This was a series that I admit to not being sure about when it first started in October 2013, but fortunately, I stuck with it and was rewarded with a series that made itself stand out from other anime series about characters who get stuck in a video game. I fell in love with this series by the time it finished airing in March 2014, and was overjoyed when the end of the final episode announced that there would be a second season that would begin airing in Fall 2014. I spent a lot of the year eagerly anticipating the second season because the first season had built such a strong foundation for the characters and their story.

Noragami: Noragami ended up being a mixed bag for me. I enjoyed the first four episodes, but then with Episode Five, I started feeling like the series wasn’t as strong as it was when it first started. My opinion improved a bit with Episode Six, and it kept improving through Episode 11. However, I was never entirely sure how I felt about Episode 12, because I couldn’t tell if it was meant to be a series finale or a season finale. As of this writing, there has been no word about a second season for Noragami, so I have to believe this was meant as a series finale. Unfortunately, there were enough loose ends that were left hanging which made it an unsatisfying note to end a series on. The manga for Noragami started being published during 2014, so I may need to start reading it at some point  and see if it might improve my opinion of the series.

Tokyo Ravens: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. When I first watched this series, I thought it had a slow start; however, enough elements were established in the first episode to interest me enough to come back to see more. With the second episode, I felt it was a little heavy on the “info dumping” side, but I was still willing to come back because the story that was developing showed a lot of promise. By the time I hit episode five, I found myself genuinely interested in Tokyo Ravens and decided that I’d see it through until the end. I ended up being interested in Tokyo Ravens for most of its 24 episode run; unfortunately, I started becoming a little disappointed in the series after a particular plot twist in Episode 23. I also ended up feeling rather let down and disappointed with how the final episode ended. FUNimation Entertainment, who had streamed the series as a simulcast, has recently announced that it has acquired the home video rights for Tokyo Ravens; unfortunately, I have no plans to purchase their release to add it to my anime home video library because of my disappointment with the final two episodes of the series.

D-Frag!: This is an anime I watched because the previews made it look like it’d be really hilarious. While there was humor in the first episode, there wasn’t as much as I had expected. And from humor I did see in the episode, I saw the potential for the series to rely on the same gags every week; unfortunately, I ended up being right with that assumption. And the gags that the series relied so heavily upon weren’t terribly funny the first time they showed up, and they wore out their welcome rather quickly. With episode two, I saw that maybe D-Frag! had potential with its story, but sadly, that potential never materialized. It also didn’t help that the series already started feeling stagnant by Episode Four. When I reached the halfway point, I decided I’d stick it out, but that the second half of the series really couldn’t go fast enough for my taste. The final episode didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress had been made on the loose threads that were out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes earlier. And the final episode was the worst of the drudgery that I saw for that show. After that episode ended, all I could think was, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!”

Yowamushi Pedal: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. After watching the first episode, I thought I could see some potential in the series. Even though I’m not a fan of cycling, I found myself getting hooked on Yowamushi Pedal the more I watched of it. I especially found myself being riveted to the action that takes place during the racing scenes. I also liked how the characters developed over the course of the series. The main focus of the first half was on developing the members of the Sohoku team, with occasional development on members of the other two teams. However, the development for the other two teams tended to take place during the Inter-High race. The main selling point of this series to me ended up being the characters and the development they go through. While the pacing of Yowamushi Pedal was pretty typical for a shonen sports anime, it’s something I got used to with each race that appeared in the series. I was happy to hear that there would be a second season for the series in Fall 2014, especially since this season ended before the winner of the second day of the Inter-High was determined.

Hamatora: After watching the first episode of Hamatora, I felt that the series showed a bit of promise; however, I was little turned off by the character of Hajime, because it appeared her gluttony was going to be a major source of humor for the series. It turns out we learn later on why Hajime is such a glutton, and it also turned out that there was more in the way of humor than just Hajime’s gluttony. It was ultimately the second episode that sold me on Hamatora. I enjoyed seeing the various mysteries that came Hamatora’s way, and how several of the episodes were able to take what appeared to be two unrelated plots and find a way to weave the two together rather successfully by the end. Overall, I enjoyed the series except for Episode Five and Episode Eight. But when I saw that there was a cliffhanger ending and that there would be another season of Hamatora coming in the future, I was looking forward to seeing more episodes in order to find out how the story continued from the cliffhanger.

Nagi no Asukara: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that after watching the first episode, I had some mixed feelings. On the one hand, I kind of liked the story, although I was finding Hikari to be a bit on the annoying side. However, I was having problems with using my willing suspension of disbelief about people being able to live underwater; it turns out that the concept of Ena, which allows them to breathe underwater, hadn’t been properly introduced by the end of the first episode. I decided to continue watching the series, and went into the second episode using my willing suspension of disbelief and focusing on the storytelling. It’s a decision I’m glad I made, because I found myself being more impressed with the series and becoming genuinely interested in the characters and their stories. I’d become so riveted with the series that when the first half reached its climax with the Ofunehiki, I was a little frustrated that I had to wait two weeks in order to find out what happened. When the second half of the series started, I have to admit that it was a bit of an adjustment to get used to the fact that a five-year timeskip had happened between the two episodes and that some of the cast members were noticeably older. I appreciated how there was a focus on the confusion for both those who returned from the surface after a five-year hibernation and those who stayed on the surface and aged five years. There’s a lot of raw emotion that’s prevalent in the second half of the series, but I found these emotions and reactions to be believable. I have to admit that for the most part, I had basically predicted what directions the various relationships would go in. However, I still found the conclusion of the series to be satisfying and enjoyable.

Samurai Flamenco: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. At the end of the first episode, I thought that between the animation and the storytelling, there seemed to be enough there to keep my interest and make me want to come back week after week to watch more of Samurai Flamenco. I have to admit that when the King Torture arc was introduced and caused the major tonal shift for the series, I wasn’t entirely sure that I liked it. It didn’t help that it was also at that point that the animation quality went down noticeably, and that “off model” shots started becoming more prevalent and noticeable. By the end of the King Torture, arc, though, I had become so accustomed to the change in tone that I started enjoying the series a bit more again. Overall, though, I did enjoy Samurai Flamenco when all was said and done.

Magical Warfare: After watching the first episode, I thought the series had some potential. After the second episode, I thought it plodded a bit due all of the exposition included, but I still thought that the overall concept still showed promise. At the end of episode three, I said that while Magical Warfare wasn’t one of my favorite series of Winter 2014, I couldn’t say that it was the worst one I was watching, either. By the end of episode four, I was already at a point where I wasn’t looking forward to watching the series week after week. As the series continued to progress, I became frustrated with how the series was paced, the fact that the villains weren’t very well defined by the halfway point of the series, and how the character development wasn’t where it needed to be for me to truly care about these characters. The final episode was a major letdown, due to how little was explained for what was happening throughout it. The ending of the final episode was so vague that the viewer was left having to make a lot of assumptions just to figure out what the heck was going on. Honestly, the way Magical Warfare ended was just so vague and bizarre that it makes the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion seem like it makes sense. And considering the reputation the ending of Neon Genesis Evangelion has, it’s really saying something. All in all, I have to say that Magical Warfare ended up being a steaming pile of poo and I think it was easily one of the worst series I watched during 2014.

Strike the Blood: This is a series that started during the Fall 2013 season and carried over into Winter 2014. I have to admit that I wasn’t entirely sure about Strike the Blood after watching the first episode, but I decided to give it a chance and continue watching it. After watching the second episode, though, I was more impressed with the series than I thought I’d be. The cliffhanger ending for episode three ultimately sold me on the series. As the series progressed through the various story arcs, more characters were introduced. Most of them seemed to have an importance to the series, although there were a couple of characters who were only truly important for one or two story arcs, and then basically all but vanished from the series. After making it through all 24 episodes of Strike the Blood, I have to say that overall, I was satisfied with how the series progressed and ultimately came to its conclusion. It was a series I came to look forward to watching.

Wizard Barristers: At the end of the first episode, I thought that Wizard Barristers showed a lot of promise. As the series went on, the story kept me interested in what was going on and made me want to come back and watch week after week. My least favorite part of the series was the animal familiars, because for the most part, they didn’t seem to truly add anything to the series. By the time I reached the final episode, I was overall rather satisfied with how the series progressed. My biggest disappointment with the series was the fact that we don’t learn what happened to Cecil’s mother. The viewer was left with the responsibility of assuming what happens.

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha: I have to admit that at the end of the first episode, I wasn’t entirely sure if I was going to like Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha. However, I decided to keep watching to see if the story would improve. After finishing episode two, my opinion of the series started becoming more favorable. As the episodes went on, I continued to enjoy the series more and more; I’m so glad I didn’t let my initial unsure impression keep me away from this series. Overall, I thought the series was good, although the last couple of episodes felt a bit rushed compared to the other episodes; I have to say that Episode 10 had more issues with being rushed than Episode Nine did.  The action in the first half of Episode 10 felt stretched out, and then the story in the second half ended up feeling rushed. In the final episode, I appreciated the fact that it demonstrated just how much Inari has grown as a character over the course of the series. In a lot of ways, when Inari returned Uka’s divine power at the end of Episode 10, it symbolizes that Inari had grown up and no longer needs the “crutch” that she thought the power was giving her. In a lot of respects, though, there is some vagueness at the end of the final episode. Do Inari and Koji ever end up together? Is Touka still able to see Uka even though Inari no longer can? It appears that the manga series is still ongoing in Japan, so that might explain why the ending of the anime is a bit ambiguous.

Additional 2014 In Review posts:

FUNimation Announces New Licenses at Otakon

FUNimation announced several new licenses acquisitions during the company’s panel at Otakon.

The company has acquired the license for:

  • The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya (both the 2006 and 2009 series)
  • The Melancholy of Haruhi-chan Suzumiya
  • Nyorōn Churuya-san
  • Lucky Star and its OVA
  • the Strike Witches film
  • Steins;Gate Fuka Ryōiki no Déjà vu

In addition, FUNimation also acquired the home video rights for the following anime:

  • D-Frag!
  • BlazBlue Alter Memory
  • Riddle Story of Devil
  • Freezing Vibration
  • Unbreakable Machine-Doll

FUNimation has also acquired the home entertainment, digital, and broadcast rights to the Black Butler – Book of Murder OVA series.

Source: ANN

Anime Spotlight: D-Frag!

D-Frag! is an anime based on a manga by Tomoya Haruno. The anime is produced by Brain’s Base and is directed by Seiki Sugawara. The series aired on Japanese television from January 6-March 24, 2014. As of this writing, FUNimation Entertainment holds the North American streaming license for D-Frag! (which the company streams under the title, D-Fragments).

D-Frag! is about a boy named Kenji Kazama, a delinquent at Fujou Academy. During the first episode, he and his friends Yokoshima and Nagayama encounter the school’s Game Creation Club when they see smoke coming out of their clubroom. After putting out the fire, the three club members (Roka, Chitose, and Sakura) start using their “battle types” to fight against them. By the end of episode one, Roka and the rest of the club get Kenji to agree to become a member of their club; the club needs one more member in order to keep the club going.

In episode two, Kenji is approached by a girl named Takao and three of her friends, who claim that Roka’s Game Creation Club is a fake and that they have a Game Creation Club that’s the real one. Takao declares that she’ll find a way to shut Roka’s club down, and we learn that Takao’s resentment comes from the fact that Roka had been in her club and then left to form her own. Takao challenges Roka to have their clubs compete against each other at the cultural festival. Roka accepts the challenge, and in the end, Roka and the others win and save their club.

Over the course of the series, various other characters are introduced and other challenges are presented to Roka’s Game Creation Club. However, in the long run, many of these new characters hardly added anything of any real value to the series.

Also, after having such a strong focus on an overarching story in the beginning, the series pretty much devolves into the characters running around and doing stupid gags instead of following an overarching story.

When I saw a preview for D-Frag!, I was expecting to find a lot of humor in the episode. While there was some humor included throughout the first episode, there wasn’t quite as much as I thought there would be. From what humor I saw in that episode, I was given the impression that there’s a potential for this series to rely on the same gags every week for the series’ humor. Sadly, I ended up being right with that assumption.

At the end of episode two, I truly did see some potential for D-Frag! Sadly, as the series progressed, that potential never materialized. Instead, it became a comedy that relied heavily on gags that weren’t terribly funny the first time and wore out their welcome rather quickly. By episode four, I felt that the series was already starting to become stagnant. When I reached the halfway point, I decided I’d stick it out, but the second half of the series really couldn’t go fast enough for my taste.

The final episode didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress has been made on the loose threads that are out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes ago. While I’ve thought that D-Frag! has been drudgery to watch for a while now, Episode 12 was the worst of this that I’ve experienced. After finishing the last episode, all I could say is that, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!”

For most of the season, D-Frag! rated as the least favorite of the six new shows that I was watching during Winter 2014. However, it managed to move up one spot when Magical Warfare had an epic fail of a final episode that helped to demote that series to the bottom rank.

Ultimately, I can’t recommend D-Frag! to anime viewers. If you enjoy comedy anime, then you’re better off avoiding this series. Regurgitated non-funny gags and a lack of direction later in the series make D-Frag! a series to avoid.

Additional Anime Spotlights:

D-Frag!: Episode 12 – “At this Rate, You’ll have Zero Friends for All Eternity!”

D-Frag! is about a boy named Kenji Kazama, a delinquent at Fujou Academy. During the first episode, he and his friends Yokoshima and Nagayama encounter the school’s Game Creation Club when they see smoke coming out of their clubroom. After putting out the fire, the three club members (Roka, Chitose, and Sakura) start using their “battle types” to fight against them. By the end of episode one, Roka and the rest of the club get Kenji to agree to become a member of their club; the club needs one more member in order to keep from being closed down.

Episode 12 provides the conclusion of the game battle between the Game Creation Club (Provisional) and the third year ex-Student Council Members. Unfortunately, there ends up being a slight time skip, since the audience never got to see the actual battle between Roka, Sakura, and Matsubara. Instead, we see that the three of them have finished, and that Roka sends a message to Kenji sharing the root of the animosity between Chitose and Tama. For the audience, we get to see an actual flashback.

After this, quite a bit of the episode shows Tama, Chitose, and Kenji talking a lot and throwing insults at each other, and not a whole lot of action takes place. The main action in their fight takes place right near the end, and this action ultimately determines who wins the game battle.

I have to say that quite a bit of Episode 12 felt like it was there more to kill time than to truly add anything to the story. In fact, most of the episode just felt like it was dragging along. As I watched, it seemed to me that the writers didn’t have enough content to have a full-length episode, so they had to add in the teachers betting on the fight, the long flashback, and the massive amount of talking that was taking place during what should have been the big and climactic fight. By the real action happened, it felt so anticlimactic.

Also, this really didn’t feel like an episode to end a series on. Nothing has been resolved at all, and little to no progress has been made on the loose threads that are out there. I found this to be an unsatisfying ending for a series that had worn out its welcome for me several episodes ago. While I’ve thought that D-Frag! has been drudgery to watch for a while now, Episode 12 was the worst of this I’ve experienced.

All I can say is, “Thank God D-Frag! is over!” If, for some reason, another season were to ever be produced for this series, I wouldn’t bother to watch it. So long, D-Frag! – I’m not going to miss you!

Additional posts about D-Frag!:

D-Frag!: Episode 11 – “What’s My Secret Move?”

D-Frag! is about a boy named Kenji Kazama, a delinquent at Fujou Academy. During the first episode, he and his friends Yokoshima and Nagayama encounter the school’s Game Creation Club when they see smoke coming out of their clubroom. After putting out the fire, the three club members (Roka, Chitose, and Sakura) start using their “battle types” to fight against them. By the end of episode one, Roka and the rest of the club get Kenji to agree to become a member of their club; the club needs one more member in order to keep from being closed down.

The episode begins with Fifty-Fifty Fujisaki, who was first introduced during the game battle for Roka’s bag, entering into the story and offering to serve as the referee for the game battle between the Game Creation Club (Provisional) and the ex-student council members.

Takao ultimately comes up with the game, which starts with each participant writing a question on their cell phone’s memo screen. After the game starts, each player does whatever it takes to nab their opponent’s cell. Answer the question on the memo screen and send it to the ref for him to judge. If they’re right, the opponent is out of the game. If they’re wrong, they’ll play a penalty game. It’s decided that if the third years win, the Game Creation Club (Provisional) will be shut down, and if the club wins, the third years will give the club 10,000 yen.

They are given 10 minutes to get someplace at the school. It turns out that Roka was weakened after a hug she received from Tama in episode 10. Kenji is told to take her to the nurse’s office during the 10 minutes, and Sakura accompanies them. However, on their way there, they encounter the Band of 14 Devils, who refuse to allow them through a hallway. Hachi, Kenji’s two buddies, as well as some other guys appear to take on the Band of 14 Devils in order to free up a pathway for Kenji, Roka, and Sakura.

When the 10 minutes are up, Kenji and the others run right into Matsubara, one of the third years, and Sakura takes her on. Kenji and Roka then encounter Naganuma, who keeps getting distracted because Roka and Sakura sound like anime voice actresses. Roka tells Kenji that she’s feeling better and that she can take on Naganuma. Kenji gets some unexpected help to allow him to get closer to returning to the original classroom in order to help Chitose against Tama.

Well, it turns out that the game doesn’t conclude in this episode, but it will have to come to an end with episode 12, since it’s the final episode of the series. Also, I’m willing to guess at this point that the next episode will primarily focus on Chitose and Tama, with a little bit to wrap up the fight between Sakura, Roka, and Matsubara.

And it turns out the unexpected help for Kenji comes from the other members of Takao’s Game Creation Club. It was surprising to see these characters again, since most of them had all but disappeared after the storyline where Takao and her club were introduced. It was also a little surprising to see the Band of 14 Devils make another appearance. Prior to this, I think they had only made a couple of appearances.

Episode 11 is basically the same kind of zany story that I’ve come to expect from this series. There was ultimately nothing to make this episode stand out when compared to a majority of the episodes in the series.

I’m just glad that I only have one more episode left to go. As the series progressed, I just found that I couldn’t get into this one like I hoped I would. Hopefully the ending of the series will be at least somewhat satisfying.

Additional posts about D-Frag!:

D-Frag!: Episode 10 – “Tama-senpai, Long Time No See”

D-Frag! is about a boy named Kenji Kazama, a delinquent at Fujou Academy. During the first episode, he and his friends Yokoshima and Nagayama encounter the school’s Game Creation Club when they see smoke coming out of their clubroom. After putting out the fire, the three club members (Roka, Chitose, and Sakura) start using their “battle types” to fight against them. By the end of episode one, Roka and the rest of the club get Kenji to agree to become a member of their club; the club needs one more member in order to keep from being closed down.

Episode 10 sees Kenji, Roka, Chitose, Sakura, and Takao playing a game of poker in the clubroom. Kenji thinks he’s won the game with a straight flush, but everyone else shows they have a flush featuring picture cards of various characters from the Scramble for Porn Mags in Space game. I guess this was supposed to be funny, but I find it very unlikely that Kenji is the only one who would’ve gotten cards with numbers and everyone else getting not only character cards, but cards of all of the same character. Yes, I know D-Frag! is a comedy, but this was just a little too difficult for me to swallow.

Since Kenji is the loser, he’s sent out to buy drinks for everyone else. As he’s heading down the hall, he is kidnapped by a girl we only saw briefly at the end of episode nine. Ataru receives a text message from the girl, saying she has Kenji in her classroom and that Chitose has to come see her if they want to see Kenji again.

As Chitose, Roka, Sakura, Takao, Ataru, and Hachi go to rescue Kenji, the audience learns more about who has kidnapped him. It turns out that the girl who took him is Tama, a third year student at the school. Tama, along with three other third years, have a chip on their shoulder when it comes to Chitose.

Shinsen, one of third year girls, is nicknamed “Barfy” due to her tendency to throw up what looks like sparkles and rainbows. She hides inside Isle, the robot owned by the Science Club; Isle is operated by Tennouzu, the president of the Science Club. Chitose and the others get into a fight with Isle.

When they finally make it to Tama’s classroom, we learn the reason why Tama decided to go after Chitose at this point in time; all I can say here is that the reason is rather lame. Near the end of the episode, when Tama declares she’ll use her powers as the ex-Student Body president to shut down the Game Creation Club (Provisional), Kenji challenges Tama and her group to a game, with the club being the collateral. The stage is set for the decisive game to take place in episode 11.

This episode introduces four new characters, with the focus primarily being put on Tama and Shinsen. The other two, Matsubara and Naganuma, tend to be more background characters than anything else. Tama comes across as a psychopath, and Shinsen is an obnoxious loudmouth who also barfs up rainbows. At this point in the series, it seems kind of odd to introduce this many characters. I know I’ll never remember all of their names before the series ends.

It was a little frustrating to have a plot that included Kenji being kidnapped again. Couldn’t there have been some other way to introduce Tama and her group to the series without resorting to recycling an already used plot idea?

At this point, I keep telling myself, “There’s only two more episodes… there’s only two more episodes…” I swear, this is the first simulcast that I can think of where the ending can’t come soon enough. It’s gotten to the point where I really don’t care anymore, and I’m simply finishing out the season in order to get these write-ups done for my blog.

Additional posts about D-Frag!: