Manga Review: Attack on Titan Volume Seven

Attack on Titan Volume Seven is a manga by Hajime Isayama, and it was published in North America by Kodansha Comics in 2013. The series is rated “T” for teens 16 and up; after reading the first seven volumes, I would agree with this rating.

Attack on Titan Volume 7
Written by: Hajime Isayama
Publisher: Kodansha
English Publisher: Kodansha Comics
Release Date: September 24, 2013

Attack on Titan is set in an alternative middle-ages world that has been attacked by giant humanoid creatures called Titans. The remains of civilization are protected by three concentric walls that are about 50 meters tall. After building these walls, humanity has remained safe for 100 years and has basically become complacent. While there are people who want to go outside of the walls and explore the wall, many are discouraged from doing so.

Eren Yeager and his friends Mikasa and Armin end up enlisting in the military forces after Unusual Titans attacked their city. Five years after that attack, Eren and his friends have to fight more Titans. At the end of Volume One, Armin sees Eren being devoured by a Titan. But it’s revealed during Volume Two that Eren possesses an ability to transform into a Titan at will.

Volume Seven sees the Survey Corps trying to capture the female Titan because they believe that she is a human who can transform into a Titan, like Eren. They’ve managed to tether her, but before they can force anyone to come out of the Titan, she lets out a bloodcurdling scream. A bunch of male Titans suddenly arrive and begin eating the female. This is kind of a disgusting scene, but at least there’s not a whole bunch of blood and gore that’s shown.

The Survey Corps is ordered to pull out and get back into formation. As they retreat, Gunther is attacked and killed by a mysterious person using maneuvering gear. Shortly after this, the female Titan reappears. When some members of the Survey Corps try to attack the female Titan in order to protect Eren, they are killed by the Titan. This causes Eren to transform into a Titan, and leads to an epic battle between Eren in Titan form and the female Titan. The female Titan forces Eren out of his Titan form and kidnaps him. Most of the rest of the volume focuses on the attempt to rescue Eren.

Volume Seven was a very action-packed and intense volume, especially during the battle between the two Titans. While there’s some blood shown during this battle, that’s come to be expected of this series. Also, it’s not surprising that the body count continues to rise, since there’s been quite a bit of violence in the series leading up to this point. I have to admit that I am a little disappointed at not getting a revelation as to who the female Titan is, but I still have my suspicions as to who she is. And hopefully more will come out in regards to the mysterious person who attacked Gunther and truly establish whether or not this person has any link with the Titans; while the characters suspect that they do, there’s nothing concrete to indicate that their hunch is correct.

But I do have to say that it was a little confusing to see the female Titan being eaten by all those male Titans, only to return later in the volume. Hopefully a future volume will explain what happened with that along with the mysterious attacker.

I’m also not surprised by what we see right at the end of Volume Seven, especially when you consider the events and casualties that occurred during the course of this volume. I found the military’s anger and the loss of public support to be realistic reactions to what happened. It’ll be interesting to see what happens to Eren, Levi, and the others in Volume Eight, and how the loss of political and public support will affect them.

After reading Volume Seven, I believe that readers who have enjoyed the first six volumes of Attack on Titan will also enjoy reading Volume Seven.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Attack on Titan Volume Seven that I checked out through the King County Library System.

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