Manga Review: Claymore Volume 25

Claymore Volume 25 is a manga by Norihiro Yagi, and it was published in North America by VIZ Media’s Shonen Jump Advanced imprint in 2014. The series is rated “T+” for older teens; from the content I saw in this volume, I would have to agree with this rating.

Claymore Volume 25
Written by: Norihiro Yagi
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: November 4, 2014

In Claymore, humans coexist with creatures called Yoma; the Yoma are sentient monsters that feed on human innards. A nameless and secretive organization was created out of half-human, half-Yoma warriors to protect the humans from the Yoma; however, this organization charges large fees for their services.  The humans have called these warriors either “Claymores” due to the large, unsheathed swords they carry or “Silver Eye Witches” due to their appearance and cold demeanor toward others. The Claymores are created by the organization by implanting Yoma flesh and blood into humans.

Clare, who is ranked at number 47 (the lowest rank for a Claymore), is the main character of the series. When she was a child, Clare’s parents were killed by a Yoma disguised as her brother; later, she meets Teresa and the two travel together. Teresa is killed by Priscilla, and Clare takes Teresa’s severed head and goes to the Organization and demands they use this in place of a Yoma to turn her into a Claymore. After becoming a warrior, Clare makes it her goal to hunt down Priscilla and kill her to avenge the death of Teresa.

Before reading Volume 25, my only previous exposure to Claymore had been through watching the anime series several years ago. Because of this exposure to the anime, I had some knowledge of the concept of the series before delving into this volume. However, the story has progressed far beyond what I knew from the anime series at this point in the manga.

Unfortunately, jumping into the story this far into it, especially in what appears to be the middle of an important story arc, did make this a little hard for me to follow. I’m looking through information online to try to piece together what I saw in this volume.

There’s at least a couple of battles between Claymores and Awakened Beings in this volume. One of the battles brings about the defeat of one of the members of the Organization, while the other provides some character development for Clarice and Miata. Near the end of the volume, Clarice has to make a major sacrifice in regard to Miata. I have a feeling that if I was more familiar with what’s led up to this point, I’d find what happens between Clarice and Miata in this volume even more touching than I did when I read it.

Overall, Volume 25 was very action-packed, so this helped to keep me interested, even without truly understanding what was going on. I suspect that readers who have been following Claymore will get a lot more out of this volume than I did and will enjoy seeing what happens.

But reading this volume, in addition to watching the anime series, has piqued my interest in trying to read the earlier volumes of Claymore in order to find out how the story progressed to the point it’s at in Volume 25.

When it comes to the art, it has a very “crisp” look to it. The style that Yagi uses complements the fantasy world that’s being depicted in the story, and I especially find that the designs of the Claymores truly give them an “otherworldly” feel. I also find that the look and feel gives Claymore a unique atmosphere to it.

From what I know of Claymore, I think it’s a manga that will appeal to readers who enjoy stories with a fantasy setting that have a dark feel and includes some significant violence in the story.

I wrote this review after reading a review copy of Claymore Volume 25 that was provided to me by VIZ Media.

Additional post about Claymore:

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