Manga Review: Dengeki Daisy Volume Two

Dengeki Daisy Volume Two is a manga by Kyousuke Motomi, and it was published in North America by VIZ Media’s Shojo Beat imprint in 2010. The series is rated “T+” for older teens; from what I’ve read of this series, I would agree with this rating.

Dengeki Daisy Volume 2
Written by: Kyousuke Motomi
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 5, 2010

Teru Kurebayashi has become an orphan after the death of her older brother, who had been serving as her guardian. Before his death, he let her know that a friend of his who goes by the online name of Daisy will help her out, and she can contact Daisy through text messaging if needed. Teru has never met Daisy; their only interactions have been through the text messages.

Teru meets a custodian at her school named Tasuku Kurosaki; she accidentally breaks a school window, and he has her working as a “servant” to pay it off. Even though Tasuku has an unpleasant attitude, he cares deeply for Teru. Unbeknownst to Teru, Tasuku is also Daisy.

Throughout Volume Two, we see that Tasuku feels conflicted. He keeps his identity as Daisy a secret, and so he ends up reading the messages Teru sends to Daisy about Tasuku; it doesn’t help that Tasuku appears to be falling for her. But he keeps up the unpleasant attitude in order to hide his true feelings. But unknown to Tasuku, Teru finds herself falling for him.

This volume also introduces a new character named Riko Onizuka. She’s a new counselor at Teru’s school, and she’s an old friend of Tasuku’s. It turns out that Riko has a connection with both Teru’s older brother and with Tasuku. Later in the volume, the reader is given a little more background for both Tasuku and Riko and how they are both connected with Teru’s older brother. I appreciated getting this backstory because it helped me to better understand Tasuku and his devotion to both Teru and to her older brother. Over the course of the volume, we also see Teru becoming closer with Riko.

Teru is also targeted by the school’s Computer Club, who are trying to get a hold of her phone. The plot also drags in someone that Teru would never suspect. Fortunately, she’s able to get Daisy on her side and help her out.

When I read Volume One, I thought the initial setup for the series was a little on the unbelievable side. When I started into Volume Two, I decided to go into it accepting the setup from Volume One; since I did that, I was better able to enjoy this volume. I really liked the addition of Riko; not only does she become a female confidante for Teru who’s already linked to Daisy, but her appearance adds a new layer to the series. I hope I’ll still think she’s a good addition at such a time as I’m able to read more volumes of Dengeki Daisy.

This volume introduces someone in the shadows who’s trying to acquire unpublished software that Teru’s brother developed. I have a feeling that this isn’t the last we’ll be seeing of this plot; however, I wonder how Motomi would continue this particular plot without it becoming repetitive or dragging down the overarching story.

When it comes to the art, there are some incredibly good close-up panels of Tasuku. On the top of page 8, there’s a good close-up of Tasuku looking conflicted; I can sense the tenseness and frustration he’s feeling by just looking at this drawing. The top of page 104 has a striking close-up of Tasuku; you can feel his emotion as well as see it.

I’m glad I gave the second volume of Dengeki Daisy a chance, because it’s turning out to be a better shojo manga series than I had given it credit for in my review of Volume One. If you enjoy reading shojo manga, then I think you might enjoy reading Dengeki Daisy.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Dengeki Daisy Volume Two that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional post about Dengeki Daisy:

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