Manga Review: Bleach Volume 10

Bleach Volume 10 is a manga by Tite Kubo, and it was published in North America by Viz Media’s Shonen Jump imprint in 2005. The series is rated “T” for teens; from what I’ve read of the manga and from what I’ve seen of the anime series, I would agree with this rating.

Bleach Volume 10
Written by: Tite Kubo
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: December 6, 2005

15-year-old Ichigo Kurosaki is the main character of the series, and he has the ability to see ghosts. After meeting a Soul Reaper named Rukia, his home is attacked by a Hollow. Rukia tries to transfer some of her powers to Ichigo so he can protect his family; however, he unintentionally absorbs all of her power. Ichigo defeats the Hollow and begins serving as a substitute Soul Reaper. In Volume Seven, Rukia was taken back to Soul Society to face punishment for transferring her powers to a human. Rukia now faces execution, and Ichigo and his friends try to find a way to get to Soul Society in order to save her.

Volume 10 opens with Kukaku saying that she will use her Flower-Crane Cannon to help Ichigo and the others be able to make it over the wall of the Seireitei. However, before she can do this, they must learn how to fill a spirit core with spirit energy, and it becomes the cannonball that will protect them against the sekki-seki that creates a sphere around the Seireitei.

Ichigo and the others go to practice filling the spirit core with their spirit energy. After a while, everyone is able to do it except for Ichigo. Ichigo ends up getting some unexpected help from Ganju. After the training, Ichigo, Orihime, Uryu, Chad, Ganju, and Yoruichi are sent through the cannon. Unfortunately, when Ganju’s incantation inside the cannonball is accidentally messed up, the group finds themselves flying in different directions.

Meanwhile, the Soul Society is in chaos, and the chaos is only made worse by the arrival of Ichigo and the others. Ichigo and Ganju end up encountering two Soul Reapers named Ikkaku Madarame and Yumichika Ayasegawa. A large focus of roughly the last third of this volume is on the fight between Ichigo and Ikkaku.

At one point in this volume, there is a meeting of the various Soul Reaper lieutenants, which allows the reader to see a number of the Soul Reaper characters, but doesn’t necessarily introduce them by name. There’s also a couple of scenes where we also meet some lower-ranked Soul Reapers for the first time. Let’s see if I can figure out which Soul Reaper characters were introduced by name in this volume: Tetsuzaemon Iba, Momo Hinamori, Rangiku Matsumoto, Kurotsuchi, Kenpachi, and Yachiru Kusajishi.

Even though I’m further than this in the anime series, I have to admit that I still have a hard time keeping the names of many of the Soul Reapers straight. The ones that have been used more in the series I have come to learn, but there’s a few where I’m like, “I recognize your face, but I don’t remember your name off the top of my head.” If there’s a weakness in Bleach at this point, I would say that it would be the sheer number of characters that are introduced after Ichigo and the others enter Soul Society.

Volume 10 has a lot of action going on, in addition to introducing a whole bunch of new characters. In my opinion, the best moments in this volume are when Ganju teaches Ichigo how to infuse his spirit energy into the spirit core and the two of them come to an understanding, and the battle between Ichigo and Ikkaku.

Even though I already know what’s going to happen in this volume since I’ve already seen this story arc in the anime, I’m still just as riveted and captivated by what’s going on as I would have been if I was being introduced to this story for the first time.

If you’ve read the previous nine volumes of Bleach and enjoyed what you read, then I think you’ll also enjoy reading Volume 10.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Bleach Volume 10 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Bleach:

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