Manga Review: Case Closed Volume 11

Case Closed Volume 11 is a manga by Gosho Aoyama, and it was published in North America by Viz Media in 2006. The series is rated “T+” for older teens; personally, I would agree with this rating.

Case Closed Volume 11
Written by: Gosho Aoyama
Publisher: Shogakukan
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: May 16, 2006

High school student Jimmy Kudo is a teen detective who was shrunk down to his first grade self after being caught by a crime organization and forced to take an experimental poison. Unknown to the criminals, Jimmy survived; in order to hide this fact, Jimmy takes on the identity of Conan Edogawa, and claims to be the relative of family friend Dr. Agasa. As Conan, Jimmy lives with his friend Rachel Moore and her bumbling private investigator father, Richard; however, Rachel doesn’t know Conan’s true identity. As Conan, Jimmy has been able to covertly help Richard solve the cases that come his way.

This volume opens with the conclusion of a mystery that began at the end of Volume 10. This is the mystery where Conan, Rachel, and Richard go skiing in the mountains. They encounter a doctor who invites them to spend time at his cabin with some of his students. The doctor was murdered at the end of Volume 10, and Conan solves the case in the beginning of Volume 11.

The next story sees Richard being a guest on a live television show that deals with mysteries and detectives. Rachel and Conan are in the studio audience. Unfortunately, the murder of a producer takes place off-screen, and Conan has to prove a particular individual was responsible. The reader already knows who the killer is, so what the reader is waiting to find out how Conan proves that this person is the murderer.

Then we see Rachel telling Conan that she’s going to meet up with Jimmy. After she leaves, Conan realizes that there’s no way she could be meeting up with him, so she follows her to a café. Rachel is unhappy that Conan tagged along, and she tells Conan she’ll buy him a cake from another store so he can take it home. After she leaves, Conan watches who comes in and tries to deduce who Rachel is meeting. Before he can figure out, murder ends up being on the menu when a patron is discovered dead in the bathroom. Conan ends up solving the mystery with the help of someone unexpected. And the person who Rachel has come to the café to meet is also a surprise.

The final story in Volume 11 sees Richard, Rachel, and Conan getting a flat tire in the mountains and going to a nearby temple to take refuge. While they’re there, they learn about a Tengu. And then the next morning the resident priest is found hanging in a storage room. The monks in training try to blame it on the Tengu, but Conan doesn’t believe that. It’s up to him to deduce how the resident priest died.

Volume 11 is chock full of murder mysteries that I was already familiar with from watching the Case Closed television anime series, and the anime adaptation was very faithful to its original manga source material. Even though I may have already known these stories and how they mysteries were solved from watching the anime, I still enjoyed revisiting these stories on the printed page. I was still as riveted by the stories when I read the manga as when I originally saw them on the screen.

Aoyama continues to tell the mysteries and stories that readers of the Case Closed series have come to expect. It always amazes me to find out how the crimes were committed, especially since there are some instances where I never would have guessed how they actually happened. I appreciate how Aoyama is able to keep the reader guessing for most of the stories before making the big reveal.

Since the last mystery is solved at the end of Volume 11, I’m curious to see which Case Closed mysteries appear in Volume 12 and whether or not I will still recognize them from the anime series.

I wrote this review after reading a copy of Case Closed Volume 11 that I checked out through the King County Library System.

Additional posts about Case Closed:

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