Manga Review: Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom Volume One

Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom Volume 1 is a manga with the story and art by Kazunari Kakei. Viz Media holds the North American rights to distribute the manga in the United States, and this manga volume was published in 2008. This English adaptation, which is presented in an “unflipped” release, was adapted by Park Cooper and Barb Lien-Cooper; the translation was done by Nori Minami. Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom is rated “T+,” and is aimed at older teens.

Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom Volume 1
Written by: Kazunari Kakei
Publisher: Shueisha
English Publisher: VIZ Media
Release Date: October 7, 2008

This volume starts out in the Demon World, where an unruly demon named Nora is trying to defy the Dark Liege once again. Unfortunately for Nora, he has tried her patience one too many times, so the Dark Liege has Nora sent to the human world for an “education” as a familiar to a human; the Dark Liege places a sealing spell on him, so he cannot use magic unless his familiar grants him permission.

Nora ends up being sent to the Tenryo Academy Middle School, where he encounters Kazuma Magari, a cool-as-ice boy who’s the school president. Kazuma is bored, so he decides to take on the contract offered to him by the Dark Liege. As part of the contract, Kazuma and Nora must work together to crack down on renegade demon actions in the human world. Kazuma and Nora don’t get along very well, and Kazuma’s not one to give Nora approval to use his magic very easily. In this volume, we learn that when the seal for Nora’s form is released, he becomes Cerberus (as the name implies, he becomes a big and vicious dog).

When it comes to the art in this manga, I definitely see a lot of the conventions I would associate with a shonen manga title such as this one (“busy” panels, big text and blinding art for explosions, uses of shadow on characters’ faces to indicate anger or seriousness, etc.) In some of the panels, when Nora looks angry or embarrassed, it really reminds me of Edward Elric’s expressions in Fullmetal Alchemist. While there’s really nothing groundbreaking about the art used in this volume, it works to capture the mood and style of the story.

Nora: The Last Chronicle of Devildom has a very interesting premise to it, and it’s something I wouldn’t mind reading future volumes of if I run across them at the library. I think readers who enjoy the Inuyasha manga series might find an interest in this series as well.

I wrote this review after checking out a copy of this manga volume through the King County Library System.

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